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25 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

Thanks for the link to this work.  I love maps  I could spend hours and hours looking at the various iterations from this project.

 

I'm something of a map fetishist myself. I have dozens which I would like to display at home, but they languish in a filing cabinet. One day, when I am rich and famous, my palace will have a suite of rooms to display my maps. But only display to myself! I only have one on show in my present non-palatial Chinese apartment. A very inaccurate, highly stylised but pretty map of my city.

 

That website has a lot of interesting information on food crops, which goes deeper than the map, fun as it is.

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On 24/07/2016 at 10:16 AM, IowaDee said:

I think that chop suey is an American creation too.

 

The jury is still out on that one.


Edited by liuzhou typo (log)
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Interesting link @liuzhou

 

I take issue with grapes originating in North America. Certainly wine existed before the new world was discovered.  N.A. did send grape roots to Europe when they had a fungus epidemic in the 1700's I believe.

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1 minute ago, gfweb said:

Interesting link @liuzhou

 

I take issue with grapes originating in North America. Certainly wine existed before the new world was discovered.  N.A. did send grape roots to Europe when they had a fungus epidemic in the 1700's I believe.

 

Indeed. Grapes and wine are generally believed to have originated in what is now Georgia (and I don't mean the American state.) Certainly millennia before Europeans discovered the Americas.

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Reading through quickly so may have overlooked it but has no one mentioned meatloaf, the great pate of the American plains?

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Hey interesting thread!! Even I love American dishes. Thanks for the suggestions's. 

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On 28/07/2016 at 1:44 AM, Jaymes said:

Reading through quickly so may have overlooked it but has no one mentioned meatloaf, the great pate of the American plains?

 

Another dish that America adopted, mostly from German and Dutch origins. However, meatloaf recipes date back to Roman times. There are also Asian versions.

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Yeah, that's why I did not list it, but meatloaf has been firmly entrenched in our food culture, and it's served in many restaurants here that specialize in American food. Ask a majority of Americans, and they think of it as our own, but I agree @liuzhouon the history of the dish.

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Methinks most "American-style" meatloaf is likely much different than historic versions or versions from dis-similar cultures. 


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
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2 hours ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

Methinks most "American-style" meatloaf is likely much different than historic versions or versions from dis-similar cultures. 

 

 

Surprisingly not. The 5th century Roman Apicius recipe is almost identical to modern American recipes.

 

I mean, there's not a lot you can do to vary a meatloaf, is there? The basics are still going to be there.

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56 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

I mean, there's not a lot you can do to vary a meatloaf, is there? The basics are still going to be there.

 

Seems to me that's akin to saying "there's not a lot you can do to vary roasted meat, etc."
To which I disagree. 
As to the meatloaf: meat and loaf are certainly essential, but ingredients and preparation method can vary greatly.

 

 

56 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

Surprisingly not. The 5th century Roman Apicius recipe is almost identical to modern American recipes.

 

To which Apicius recipe do you refer?

A quick search doesn't turn up anything that would commonly be thought of as meatloaf in this day and age.


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)

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1 minute ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

To which Apicius recipe do you refer?

A quick search doesn't turn up anything that would commonly be called meatloaf in this day and age.

 

I'm sorry, but I only have the book on a malfunctioning Kindle here. In Latin.

I'm not sure what is available online in the way of translations.

 

It refers to beef, bread and milk + some herbs. Ground together (haché would be more accurate - them Romans didn't have a lot of electric grinders), then baked.

 

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11 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

I'm sorry, but I only have the book on a malfunctioning Kindle here. In Latin.

 

What's the Latin name of the recipe?

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30 minutes ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

 

What's the Latin name of the recipe?

 

Leporem farsum

 

This refers to a hare meat loaf, but other meats were often substituted as "fake hare".

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From Joseph Dommers Vehling's translation.

With commentatary by Prof. Frederick Starr

[384] STUFFED HARELEPOREM FARSUM

WHOLE [pine] NUTS, ALMONDS, CHOPPED NUTS OR BEECHNUTS, WHOLE PEPPER ARE MIXED WITH THE [force] MEAT OF HARE THICKENED WITH EGGS AND WRAPPED IN PIG’S CAUL TO BE ROASTED IN THE OVEN [1]. ANOTHER FORCEMEAT IS MADE WITH RUE, PLENTY OF PEPPER, ONION, SATURY, DATES, BROTH, REDUCED WINE, OR SPICED WINE. THIS IS REDUCED TO THE PROPER CONSISTENCY AND IS LAID UNDER; BUT THE HARE REMAINS IN THE BROTH FLAVORED WITH LASER.

[1] Reminding of the popular meat loaf, made of remnants: Falscher Hase, “Imitation Hare,” as it is known on the Continent.

The ancients probably used the trimmings of hare and other meat for this forcemeat, or meat loaf, either to stuff the hare with, or to make a meal of the preparation itself, as indicated above.

We also recall that the ancients had ingenious baking moulds of metal in the shape of hares and other animals. These moulds, no doubt, were used for baking or the serving of preparations of this sort. The absence of table forks and cutlery as is used today made such preparations very appropriate and convenient in leisurely dining.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Best of luck convincing those familiar with "American-style" meatloaf that that is, as you say, "almost identical to modern American recipes." O.o

 

Anyway, carry-on. ;)


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
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2 hours ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

We also recall that the ancients had ingenious baking moulds of metal in the shape of hares and other animals

 

8 minutes ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

Best of luck convincing those familiar with "American-style" meatloaf that that is, as you say, "almost identical to modern American recipes. O.o

Don't you bake your meatloaf in a rabbit-shaped mold? I'm thinking of some bunny molds that would be just the ticket xD!

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Ah yes, ear of meatloaf, an old family favorite.    Last one to the table gets bunny butt loaf.  This is such a fun topic.

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8 minutes ago, IowaDee said:

Ah yes, ear of meatloaf, an old family favorite.    Last one to the table gets bunny butt loaf.  This is such a fun topic.

Damn you!  I had a hot coffee halfway to my mouth when I read this.  Good job we Canadians are not a litigious nation!


Edited by Anna N (log)
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On 7/29/2016 at 2:04 AM, liuzhou said:

 

Another dish that America adopted, mostly from German and Dutch origins. However, meatloaf recipes date back to Roman times. There are also Asian versions.

 

Of course, of course, LH.  I don't think you'd have to explain to any of us Americans, and by that I mean all Americans - north, south, central - that the US is a "melting pot" of many ethnic groups, cultures, cuisines.  We're an immigrant nation and that's one of the things we're famous for.  With the exception of Native American dishes (and some might argue that even they were brought over on the land bridge from Asia) and well-known New World ingredients, EVERYTHING here in the US likely has origins elsewhere.  I know I do.

 

But let me remind you of the original query: 

 

"Hii

Please mention some American dishes names. I am learning cooking and I want to know few of the great dishes names which are liked by the majority of people."

 

Now, it's certainly possible that the original poster meant, by "American", to refer to the entire hemisphere, and was interested in beginning an in-depth scholarly research discussion as to which dishes and ingredients are indigenous to The Americas.

 

But I don't think so.

 

I think he was interested in learning a "few of the great dishes which are liked by the majority of people" in the US.

 

Although I have no doubt that everywhere in the world where there was meat there was also some sort of loaf made from it, I firmly believe that typical US American meatloaf as prepared in countless kitchens across this land, complete with a US-type non-Indian-ketchup-based sauce carefully ladled over the top, qualifies.

 

I would suggest that to him.  Along with fried chicken and apple pie.  

 

However something tells me he long since may have given up.

 

And left.


Edited by Jaymes (log)
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Well in fairness the OP posted and then IIRC hasn't reacted. I had assumed it was someone looking for a quick assignment credit.

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14 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

Surprisingly not. The 5th century Roman Apicius recipe is almost identical to modern American recipes.

 

I mean, there's not a lot you can do to vary a meatloaf, is there? The basics are still going to be there.

 

Yes, true.

 

But then again, maybe not.

 

Meatloaf and meatballs are pretty similar in the makings, but in execution turn out very different.

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It is a shame the OP hasn't commented further but nevertheless this has become an interesting discussion, perhaps especially for those like me who read eGullet regularly but have never set foot in any part of the American continent.  I love reading the breakfast, lunch and dinner threads where many of the entries are made by US or Canadian residents.  Often I have no idea what the ingredients are.  I know of course that I can use Google, Wiki etc but despite some time with these and similar references I still don't understand what you are eating when you write of Kimchi, this seems a popular item in the threads but my research told me only that there is a vast range of dishes and ingredients going by that name.

 

America, even if simply the USA, is such a vast space.  Is it possible that there are foods considered traditional across the land, then there is Hawaii.  

 

Whether or not X dish was first served up in a Roman bath house (was going to put brothel but not certain these existed; I do know food was served at Roman bath houses, at least the one in what is now Leicester, England) is interesting but in my view it is more interesting to see what Americans have developed these dishes into over the decades.

 

OK pizza might have come from Naples with Chinese originated tomatoes but as mentioned earlier the US alone has interpreted 'pizza' and embedded these interpretations, or some at least, in what foreigners like me understand to be really traditional American food.  In Europe we have an understanding of Chicago pizza as different to the pizzas we get at an 'Italian' restaurant at home.

 

Despite years of reading this forum I have no idea as to whether 'Americans' - those in the US for now - really share the same basic culinary culture.  I can't imagine they do, California is so far from New York say, why would their food traditions be the same?  Is the Thanksgiving dinner really basically the same across all states?  

 

Going back to pizza, I see this in breakfast, lunch and dinner threads. Why not?  It is really just cheese and vegetables with bread as might be found in different guises across the world and at different parts of the day.  Even accepting (just for now) that 'pizza' has become an American tradition, we non-Americans can't work out when in the day it might usually be eaten, whether home made or at a restaurant, whether toppings might vary, or style of crust, depending on time of day.

 

Seems to me this is a hugely complex topic that one might take a lifetime to research.  As traditions evolve the project could never be considered complete.  All this without even considering traditional diets in southern American countries or in Canada.

 

This is a hugely long ramble and despite leaving it to one side a while in hope I would come back inspired and concise I find only that the more I think about it, and indeed read about it, the more I realise there is still to learn.  Food traditions still vary even between towns on this half island known as England.  The other half, Scotland, is very different again.  Probably most people in both would understand the basics of a Sunday roast dinner.  Besides the meat, other elements will vary from region to region. 

 

I can't define quintessential English food.  We are another nation of immigrants.  For my part I grew up in a household not Kosher but heavily influenced by Jewish cuisine and by Mediterranean cooking for another reason.  My understanding of an English everyday diet when younger was most different to that of my husband who grew up in northern England with generations of family from around the same region, give or take the odd French or Irish ancestor.

 

I did note that the OP had been back to eGullet since starting this thread.  Perhaps he or she is reading but finding it difficult to join in.  I'm guessing English is not the first language of this person.  

 

So, after all that, long live this thread.  If I do ever get to visit America I might have more of an idea as to the food I might discover.

 

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