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dscheidt

Height above range for shelf?

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Our kitchen is sorely lacking in places to put stuff. (Who the heck remodels a kitchen without upper cabinets?)  I've got a 30" range (bog standard american gas range), with nothing above it, and we'd like to put a shelf there.  How high are shelves like that typically mounted?  And what's a standard depth?  I'd like to be able to hang some stuff (pots, or utensils, or both) from it, at least in the back.  

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There's no hood or exhaust fan?  FWIW, in my house the electric range has a fan 24" above the burners.  I think that would be a little low for a cabinet, especially with gas.  Have you considered a pot rack?  Some models attach to the wall and extend out, some hang from the ceiling

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5 hours ago, dscheidt said:

Our kitchen is sorely lacking in places to put stuff. (Who the heck remodels a kitchen without upper cabinets?)  I've got a 30" range (bog standard american gas range), with nothing above it, and we'd like to put a shelf there.  How high are shelves like that typically mounted?  And what's a standard depth?  I'd like to be able to hang some stuff (pots, or utensils, or both) from it, at least in the back.  

You can put a metal pot rack, as noted by Pastrygirl above the range and many have a "shelf" or metal grid.  Where I live, if there is no exhaust hood, the minimum clearance above a gas cooktop for any cabinet is 48"  - minimum clear space above an electric is 36" 

 

You should check the CODE in your area because if you have a fire - due to the kitchen range or cooktop, and there is not adequate clearance above the burners, your fire insurance can refuse to pay.  

 

Overstock has this one on sale.

 


Edited by andiesenji (log)
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I concur with the comments above, you do not want gas fumes in your house.  It can be difficult, particularly if you're range is on an inner wall, but it is very important that gas fumes be vented outside.

When I converted to gas, I had a challenge finding a way to duct the hood, but my solution was to put the range at an angle in the corner, creating space behind to go down and out under the floor.  It also provided an opportunity for additional cabinets and shelving.

 

 

 

 

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kitchen111608a.jpg


Edited by fisherPete (log)
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