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Found Ultimate Induction Wok


Fast996
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I have looked for years for a black steel wok with a flat bottom it had to be thick steel to stop it from warping on the induction cooktop 3500W Burner. Well I found it made by the French company Mauviel it is 12.5" diameterwith 3mm thick steel the flat bottom is 4 1/2 inches, although it has a flat inside too it cooks wonderfully. The weight is 5lbs heavy but manageable .The cost is $100 considering there is no alternative it's cheap.Here is my review. I know there are people looking for a good wok for induction so I hope some find this post good information.I do have a JWright cast iron wok that I've used for 5 years and it too is great but it's discontinued. This M Steel Wok is much better. Posted some images of the seasoned wok so you can see it . This is after oven season @500 Degrees.Turning black already non stick .Happy !:D:D

 

Mauviel M'Steel Black Steel Wok, 11.8", Steel

 

If you have any ?? please post i'll do my best to answer.

 

wok11.jpg

wok10.jpg

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  • 4 years later...
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For me, the minimum diameter for a wok should be 14". barely big enough to stir fry for two.  Especially if it is flat bottom.

 

less than 14" it is just a deep skillet.

 

I prefer a 16" wok. 

 

dcarch

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  • 9 months later...
On 8/18/2020 at 4:23 AM, dcarch said:

For me, the minimum diameter for a wok should be 14". barely big enough to stir fry for two.  Especially if it is flat bottom.

 

less than 14" it is just a deep skillet.

 

I prefer a 16" wok. 

 

dcarch

 

 

I just came across this.

 

The most common size for a domestic wok here is 35 cm - just under 14 inches. And they are commonly used to cook multiple dishes at one meal, for a lot more than two people.

 

5 hours ago, claussen said:

I'm looking at shifting over to carbon steel wok

 

The way to go. The vast majority of woks used in China on a daily basis are carbon steel. I wouldn't buy anything else.

 

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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2 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

How about for one old person?

 

 

Well, as one old person, I can recommend a 30 cm (just short of 12 inch) cast iron wok. These seem to be the smallest on offer here. And smaller woks work just fine! They have the benefit of being lighter.

I still use 34 cm woks, but as the years go past, it's becoming more difficult to life and toss the things.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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13 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

Well, as one old person, I can recommend a 30 cm (just short of 12 inch) cast iron wok. These seem to be the smallest on offer here. And smaller woks work just fine! They have the benefit of being lighter.

I still use 34 cm woks, but as the years go past, it's becoming more difficult to life and toss the things.

 

I do have a beautiful, well seasoned, just short of 12 inch cast iron wok -- or since it is Japanese, what they call Chinese cooking vessel.

 

But since I am afraid to ruin it, what I usually grab is my banged up 3-ply Thai stir fry pan.

 

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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  • 6 months later...

Bumping this old thread to ask some advice.  I have a Joyce Chen thin carbon steel flat bottomed wok, 14" that I use on my induction burner.  My problem is that the flat bottom is no longer flat - it is convex, so the wok isn't stable when it rests on the induction burner.  I'm debating trying to flatten it vs getting a new one.  The issue is that my induction burner is very powerful, but since it's relatively inexpensive, when put in a low power setting, it just turns the high power on and off a few seconds each.  Moving to a thicker carbon steel wok might keep it from warping, but doesn't that defeat the purpose of a wok - something that heats and cools quickly?

 

Also, I've read that to keep it from warping, you shouldn't heat the wok without anything in it, but then how does one season it (not in the oven)?  And I've always thought that the way to cook with a wok is to heat it empty until it smokes, then add the oil, which helps make it nonstick... Also, I usually let the wok sit on the heat after I've rinsed it and wiped it to allow the super thin left over oil turn into more seasoning - is this not a good idea?

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1 hour ago, KennethT said:

Bumping this old thread to ask some advice.  I have a Joyce Chen thin carbon steel flat bottomed wok, 14" that I use on my induction burner.  My problem is that the flat bottom is no longer flat - it is convex, so the wok isn't stable when it rests on the induction burner.  I'm debating trying to flatten it vs getting a new one.  The issue is that my induction burner is very powerful, but since it's relatively inexpensive, when put in a low power setting, it just turns the high power on and off a few seconds each.  Moving to a thicker carbon steel wok might keep it from warping, but doesn't that defeat the purpose of a wok - something that heats and cools quickly?

 

Also, I've read that to keep it from warping, you shouldn't heat the wok without anything in it, but then how does one season it (not in the oven)?  And I've always thought that the way to cook with a wok is to heat it empty until it smokes, then add the oil, which helps make it nonstick... Also, I usually let the wok sit on the heat after I've rinsed it and wiped it to allow the super thin left over oil turn into more seasoning - is this not a good idea?

 

One of the unsung advantages of induction is that it "works" even if a pan doesn't sit dead flat--in fact, the pan doesn't need to actually touch the glass at all.  The issue is keeping the pan close and stable enough to use safely without triggering the detector--which is the real reason the appliance makers tell us our pans should be dead flat.

 

If a silicone trivet or potholder stabilizes your wok, try that.  If not, consider the "mallet-n-board" straightening method. It won't matter if you make it slightly concave, as long as it sits securely.  And (this may be controversial), you might consider going with a conventional round-bottom wok used with a ring.  Some of the Euro companies even offer rings with silicone feet that won't scratch your Ceran.  If you want to investigate this, there is an old thread on the "other" site, and the poster who investigated available models is SWISSAIRE. 

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@Laurentius - yes, even though it doesn't sit flat, it still gets hot, for sure.  But, many times people do deep frying or shallow frying in a wok, or boiling in water, not just stir frying, and in those cases, having a slightly convex bottom is quite dangerous.  I've managed it a couple times, but I don't want to do it too much and push my luck.

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8 minutes ago, KennethT said:

@Laurentius - yes, even though it doesn't sit flat, it still gets hot, for sure.  But, many times people do deep frying or shallow frying in a wok, or boiling in water, not just stir frying, and in those cases, having a slightly convex bottom is quite dangerous.  I've managed it a couple times, but I don't want to do it too much and push my luck.

Yes, be safe.  You might just find that your wok sits well enough into a ring to work.  Probably bes to find one that's 18/8 or 18/10, i.e., nonmagnetic.

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