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Gardening: 2016 (midyear)


ElainaA
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7 minutes ago, shain said:

Every tree is different, but they do seem a little paler then I'm used to. Perhaps if you'll give them some more time they will get sweeter, it's a late season orange, and can hang a long time on the tree unharmed.

 

That's good advice.  I've been rather mystified by these little fruits and wanted to check and see if they were edible at all so I picked some to have a look-see.   I was pleasantly surprised that they were OK and not terribly bitter but also wondering what to do with the little guys.  

 

Not a great photo due to the angle of the sun but you can see there are plenty of fruits there:

IMG_3251.jpg

I'll give them some more time.  

 

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On ‎7‎/‎4‎/‎2016 at 8:33 AM, shain said:

Not from my garden, but rather a nearby grove. Those are some of the first carob beans of the season.

 

Shain, could you tell us generally where you're living, with carob groves nearby?

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13 hours ago, djyee100 said:

 

Shain, could you tell us generally where you're living, with carob groves nearby?

 

I live in the mid-north coastal area of Israel. Carob trees grow wild in some places nearby, but this grove was planted. 

~ Shai N.

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12 hours ago, shain said:

 

I live in the mid-north coastal area of Israel. Carob trees grow wild in some places nearby, but this grove was planted. 

 

Thanks. I didn't know much about carob until you posted about it, and I went poking around the web. Carob is a Mediterranean plant, known to be cultivated for over 4,000 years. I don't recall seeing carob trees around here, but it wouldn't surprise me if they're grown in people's backyards, and fresh carob must be in the markets somewhere. The trees are supposed to be more common in southern California. I will look for carob the next time I'm at the market.

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I'm not posting much because my harvests right now always look pretty much alike - lots of salad greens. 

DSC01328.jpg

But today was the first watermelon radish.

DSC01327.jpg

I posted the garlic scape and basil pesto that I cut today in the dinner thread.

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If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. Cicero

But the library must contain cookbooks. Elaina

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13 hours ago, djyee100 said:

 

Thanks. I didn't know much about carob until you posted about it, and I went poking around the web. Carob is a Mediterranean plant, known to be cultivated for over 4,000 years. I don't recall seeing carob trees around here, but it wouldn't surprise me if they're grown in people's backyards, and fresh carob must be in the markets somewhere. The trees are supposed to be more common in southern California. I will look for carob the next time I'm at the market.

Also make sure to keep an eye open for carob syrup - it's seriously good. 

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~ Shai N.

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We had a huge carob on the property years ago that was ancient and gorgeous. Unfortunately this was before the internet and the fabulous luxury of looking up things. so we never used the pods although they smelled good. It was the era of carob as a chocolate sub but we had no idea how to use it fresh. We lost it unfortunately - maybe growing over the cesspool leach field became and issue. Plus trees do have various lifespans.

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On ‎7‎/‎7‎/‎2016 at 2:22 PM, heidih said:

It was the era of carob as a chocolate sub but we had no idea how to use it fresh.

 

That was all I knew of carob before my last foray on the web. It was too bad. I tasted carob back when it was a sub for chocolate, and because nothing can sub well for chocolate, I didn't appreciate carob on its own merits and dismissed it as an ingredient. Gotta go hunting for some carob around here.

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On 7/8/2016 at 0:22 AM, heidih said:

we never used the pods although they smelled good.

 

I guess you are lucky to have had the female plant. The male trees can have quite an unpleasant scent when in bloom. Also no fruits from them.

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~ Shai N.

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It's always nice to come home from vacation to find your plants are doing well....  and I always find it funny to see how much things grow in a little over a week - usually, I continually watch it grow - it see it every day in my living room, but when you're away and come back, you really see the difference.

 

Here's a new pic of the corianders:

20160710_105207.jpg

Notice on the sawtooth that a stalk has come up from the middle of the plant where there are tons of smaller leaves - I don't know if that's a bolting situation or if it's supposed to do that?  I gather the sawtooth doesn't bolt as easily as the standard coriander, which, as you can see, looks just fine.  Maybe I'll trim it anyway just to see what happens.

 

Yu choi:

20160710_105213.jpg

 

The rau ram... I trimmed this down heavily about a week ago... this stuff grows like a weed.

20160710_105220.jpg

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Some stuff:

 

Although my sub-par treatment, a few of the black eyed peas I scattered around has managed to grow some (as in 3...) pods.

20160708_195030.jpg

It might suffice for a couple of servings, don't you think? o.O

 

Also, the dill plants has gone to seed. I've never cooked with dill seeds, it tastes a little like caraway, but with distinctive dill note.

This is just a sample from a single plant. There are so many left, I think I have enough to sew a field.

20160709_195118.jpg20160709_194926.jpg

 

 

 

Iv'e also collected some figs from a tiny park, near my house. We already ate most of them before Iv'e thought of taking a picture.

There are two varieties, as it seems, the wide purple one is sweet and juicy, the lean green ones are somewhat dried, but more flavorful.

I should pick more this week. It seems no one around knows about those trees or care enough to pick the fruits, people are missing quite a lot when not exploring and enjoying the nature around them.

20160709_194801.jpg

 

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~ Shai N.

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10 hours ago, heidih said:

I found this interview with  a dedicated tomato guy very interesting. Margaret Roach interviewing Craig Lehoullier author or Epic Tomatoes.He is also the tomato advisor to Seed Savers Exchange.

 

http://awaytogarden.com/epic-tomatoes-craig-lehoullier/

 

@heidih,

 

Thanks for that link. I didn't know about the NC Tomato Man, and he probably lives just a few miles from me. It's a long article, but the NPR audio podcast makes it effortless, and there is a lot of good information for those interested in gardening. His enthusiasm is infectious. I especially loved the tip about upping production from eggplant and pepper plants by growing them in containers to keep their roots warmer, like they love. There are also useful cooking and preserving tips here.

> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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Craig is a good guy. he sent me seeds a couple times. 

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~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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This time of the season is, for me, transition time. Changing some beds over and starting to plan for fall crops.

This bed, which was all garlic, has been reworked with compost and replanted with bush beans (left side) and beets (upper right).

It's still too early to plant daikon, watermelon radish and radicchio.

 

July 11 010.JPG

 

Still waiting for the first tomato however it may be soon.

 

July 11 006.JPG

 

As for hot peppers.

 

July 11 002.JPG

 

Lots of herbs: mint, sage and thyme, Also dill, coriander, tarragon, flat leaf parsley, garlic chives, chives, oregano, rosemary and

basil.

 

July 11 011.JPG

 

And the Thai basil.

 

July 11 008.JPG

 

And finally today's 'pickage' (I'll adopt that term). Swiss chard, zucchini, mixed bush beans and romaine.

 

July 11 014.JPG

 

 

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I know it's stew. What KIND of stew?

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Oh Wayne, I LOVE swiss chard.  I first had it when I was a kid.  So buttery and good.  I can count on one hand the times that I've eaten it.  I don't think it will grow very well here.  Too hot.

 

LOOK (remember a couple years ago when I was taking boxes of zucchini to the campground and leaving...hoping that I didn't get caught lol)

 

We ate the first one last night.  Good stuff.

 

photo 1.jpg

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24 minutes ago, Shelby said:

Oh Wayne, I LOVE swiss chard.  I first had it when I was a kid.  So buttery and good.  I can count on one hand the times that I've eaten it.  I don't think it will grow very well here.  Too hot.

 

 

Agree wholeheartedly. I started growing it many years ago as a substitute for spinach (which bolts too readily) and now prefer it to spinach.

I suggest giving it a try. It's planted as soon as I can work the soil in early spring and I harvest it as you would kale by taking the outer leaves over the course of the summer. I'm in a 7a growing zone and it doesn't seem to mind the heat here.

 

Zucchini makes great pickles.

 

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I know it's stew. What KIND of stew?

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