Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Edit History

Please note that revisions older than -1 days are pruned and will no longer show here
rarerollingobject

rarerollingobject

12278953_10153782389564122_7731882785015718955_n.jpg

Tamagoyaki (omelette) maker
Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

12278908_10153782389494122_4252159247399981593_n.jpg

Cucumbers pickling in sake lees

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

12313895_10153782389439122_5145390976135655907_n.jpg

Unagi (eel) stall

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

12310409_10153782389359122_7863623418044588573_n.jpg
Grilled fish - that says kamasu, which Google tells me is whiting
Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

12321108_10153782389329122_86841600220733224_n.jpg
Obligatory photo of the plastic food key rings

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

11221763_10153782389274122_6594885423404890797_n.jpg

Grilled things

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

11045478_10153782389234122_8300695814382281717_n.jpg

Wagyu/kobe beef of various grades, to be grilled on the spot

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

12299144_10153782389209122_3709217265348899553_n.jpg

Kameboko/fish cake stand

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

12313742_10153782389184122_5381065715382700225_n.jpg

More fish cakes

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

12278719_10153782389159122_310925608162514286_n.jpg

Roasting sweet potatoes

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

12316477_10153782389124122_9000045759944369446_n.jpg

Oysters, turban shells/sazae

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

12316125_10153782389104122_2508235860141035294_n.jpg

Sashimi on sticks

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

11224809_10153782389074122_1018200332252133509_n.jpg

Nikuman (beef bun), snack for me

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

12289738_10153782389029122_640027615044441943_n.jpg

Shop!

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

12299106_10153782389009122_1306638882934334518_n.jpg

Grilled and simmered fish stall

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

12341267_10153782388969122_2109964357523592513_n.jpg

Warabi - mochi/pounded sticky rice sweets, usually rolled in roasted soybean or green tea powder

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

12316110_10153782388929122_2898611930839186650_n.jpg

Grilled buri (yellowtail) and baby squid

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

12321630_10153782388884122_9097164552864970822_n.jpg

More pickles

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

11251624_10153782388859122_4787950139583272427_n.jpg

Chief Pickle Inspector

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

11012855_10153782388819122_5852995100009778581_n.jpg

Lemon tuna sashimi, snack for me 

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

12342861_10153785308919122_2100036297118535195_n.jpg

Now we're onto to Sapporo, the snowy capital of Hokkaido. We arrived and immediately realised that we're pathetic Australians who are shithouse at dealing with snow, so we stood outside for approximately 30 seconds of the whole trip. This is at a kaisendon (seafood rice bowl) place in Nijo Fish Market, Sapporo

 

12345675_10153785308899122_9021013434627162073_n.jpg
SO GOOD. This had salmon roe, uni, sweet amaebi prawn, salmon belly, scallops, squid, tuna, ark shell clam and a raw crab leg (not shown, I ate it before remembering to take a photo)

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

12347698_10153785673299122_7945364783130413697_n.jpg

Akami (lean) tuna
Nemuro Hanamaru Kaiten Sushi, Sapporo

 

12299131_10153785673229122_3984814871417700082_n.jpg

Engawa (flounder fin)

Nemuro Hanamaru Kaiten Sushi, Sapporo

 

12346388_10153785673209122_3104316981376211122_n.jpg

Aburi (grilled) salmon

Nemuro Hanamaru Kaiten Sushi, Sapporo

 

12342575_10153785673179122_3906744782119271500_n.jpg

Scallop grilled in its shell and eaten standing in a gutter on our second trip to Nijo Market, Sapporo

 

12301455_10153785673134122_5411816346642090994_n.jpg

Flower crab,

Nijo Market, Sapporo

 

12294779_10153785673079122_465020824260491058_n.jpg

Snow crab,

Nijo Market, Sapporo

 

12346421_10153785673039122_1085441165302506297_n.jpg

Hairy crab

Nijo Market, Sapporo

 

11215139_10153785673019122_5765192926208614414_n.jpg

Giant octopus leg

Nijo Market, Sapporo

 

12249978_10153785672989122_4886571133670251274_n.jpg

Crab tank

Nijo Market, Sapporo

 

12308493_10153785672944122_4365594369102202575_n.jpg

Spiny crab

Nijo Market, Sapporo

 

12308326_10153785672894122_4183411243590327402_n.jpg

 

12308403_10153785672859122_6589553859931584330_n.jpg

12301455_10153785672754122_4012493370750616640_n.jpg

Nijo Market, Sapporo

 

12346414_10153785672724122_395699471303208950_n.jpg

12192001_10153787150374122_496920151352219610_n.jpg

This was then in Hakodate, a town south of Sapporo. At an uni-specialist restaurant. Uni gratin - uni, in uni custard, grilled in its shell. After.

Uni Murakami, Hakodate Morning Market

 

12316151_10153787150319122_5208634735555658697_n.jpg

Before.

Uni Murakami, Hakodate Morning Market

12316268_10153787150284122_193536231983205921_n.jpg

Uni and shiso leaf tempura.

Uni Murakami, Hakodate Morning Market

12308483_10153787150244122_4777362235188526716_n.jpg

More uni and shiso tempura (I ordered a second serving!)
Uni Murakami, Hakodate Morning Market

 

12239573_10153787150214122_250684928550315116_n.jpg

My mother's uni tempura rice bowl.

Uni Murakami, Hakodate Morning Market

 

 

12294741_10153787150154122_5703247426178837466_n.jpg

Raw uni don 

Uni Murakami, Hakodate Morning Market

rarerollingobject

rarerollingobject

12278953_10153782389564122_7731882785015718955_n.jpg

Tamagoyaki (omelette) maker
Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

12278908_10153782389494122_4252159247399981593_n.jpg

Cucumbers pickling in sake lees

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

 

12313895_10153782389439122_5145390976135655907_n.jpg

Unagi (eel) stall

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

 

12310409_10153782389359122_7863623418044588573_n.jpg
Grilled fish - that says kamasu, which Google tells me is whiting
Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

12321108_10153782389329122_86841600220733224_n.jpg
Obligatory photo of the plastic food key rings

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

11221763_10153782389274122_6594885423404890797_n.jpg

Grilled things

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

11045478_10153782389234122_8300695814382281717_n.jpg

Wagyu/kobe beef of various grades, to be grilled on the spot

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

12299144_10153782389209122_3709217265348899553_n.jpg

Kameboko/fish cake stand

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

12313742_10153782389184122_5381065715382700225_n.jpg

More fish cakes

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

12278719_10153782389159122_310925608162514286_n.jpg

Roasting sweet potatoes

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

12316477_10153782389124122_9000045759944369446_n.jpg

Oysters, turban shells/sazae

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

12316125_10153782389104122_2508235860141035294_n.jpg

Sashimi on sticks

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

11224809_10153782389074122_1018200332252133509_n.jpg

12289738_10153782389029122_640027615044441943_n.jpg

Shop!

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

12299106_10153782389009122_1306638882934334518_n.jpg

Grilled and simmered fish stall

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

12341267_10153782388969122_2109964357523592513_n.jpg

Warabi - mochi/pounded sticky rice sweets, usually rolled in roasted soybean or green tea powder

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

12316110_10153782388929122_2898611930839186650_n.jpg

Grilled buri (yellowtail) and baby squid

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

12321630_10153782388884122_9097164552864970822_n.jpg

More pickles

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

11251624_10153782388859122_4787950139583272427_n.jpg

My mama inspecting pickles

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

11012855_10153782388819122_5852995100009778581_n.jpg

Lemon tuna sashimi, snack for me 

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

 

12342861_10153785308919122_2100036297118535195_n.jpg

Now we're onto to Sapporo, the snowy capital of Hokkaido. We arrived and immediately realised that we're pathetic Australians who are shithouse at dealing with snow, so we stood outside for approximately 30 seconds of the whole trip. This is at a kaisendon (seafood rice bowl) place in Nijo Fish Market, Sapporo

 

12345675_10153785308899122_9021013434627162073_n.jpg
SO GOOD. This had salmon roe, uni, sweet amaebi prawn, salmon belly, scallops, squid, tuna, ark shell clam and a raw crab leg (not shown, I ate it before remembering to take a photo)

Nishiki Market, Kyoto

12347698_10153785673299122_7945364783130413697_n.jpg

Akami (lean) tuna
Nemuro Hanamaru Kaiten Sushi, Sapporo

 

12299131_10153785673229122_3984814871417700082_n.jpg

Engawa (flounder fin)

Nemuro Hanamaru Kaiten Sushi, Sapporo

12346388_10153785673209122_3104316981376211122_n.jpg

Aburi (grilled) salmon

Nemuro Hanamaru Kaiten Sushi, Sapporo

12342575_10153785673179122_3906744782119271500_n.jpg

Scallop grilled in its shell and eaten standing in a gutter on our second trip to Nijo Market, Sapporo

 

12301455_10153785673134122_5411816346642090994_n.jpg

Flower crab,

Nijo Market, Sapporo

 

12294779_10153785673079122_465020824260491058_n.jpg

Snow crab,

Nijo Market, Sapporo

12346421_10153785673039122_1085441165302506297_n.jpg

Hairy crab

Nijo Market, Sapporo

11215139_10153785673019122_5765192926208614414_n.jpg

Giant octopus leg

Nijo Market, Sapporo

12249978_10153785672989122_4886571133670251274_n.jpg

Crab tank

Nijo Market, Sapporo

12308493_10153785672944122_4365594369102202575_n.jpg

Spiny crab

Nijo Market, Sapporo

 

12308326_10153785672894122_4183411243590327402_n.jpg

 

12308403_10153785672859122_6589553859931584330_n.jpg

12301455_10153785672754122_4012493370750616640_n.jpg

Nijo Market, Sapporo

12346414_10153785672724122_395699471303208950_n.jpg

12192001_10153787150374122_496920151352219610_n.jpg

This was then in Hakodate, a town south of Sapporo. At an uni-specialist restaurant. Uni gratin - uni, in uni custard, grilled in its shell. After.

Uni Murakami, Hakodate Morning Market

 

12316151_10153787150319122_5208634735555658697_n.jpg

Before.

Uni Murakami, Hakodate Morning Market

12316268_10153787150284122_193536231983205921_n.jpg

Uni and shiso leaf tempura.

Uni Murakami, Hakodate Morning Market

12308483_10153787150244122_4777362235188526716_n.jpg

More uni and shiso tempura (I ordered a second serving!)
Uni Murakami, Hakodate Morning Market

 

12239573_10153787150214122_250684928550315116_n.jpg

My mother's uni tempura rice bowl.

Uni Murakami, Hakodate Morning Market

 

 

12294741_10153787150154122_5703247426178837466_n.jpg

Raw uni don 

Uni Murakami, Hakodate Morning Market

  • Similar Content

    • By Drew777
      I'm a Brit. I'm also a closet Frenchman.  To cap it all, I'm happily retired in Bangkok, the city of a street food culture that's second to none. The Thais are healthy and slim. I'm just this side of alive and far from slim. Lockdown has me fantasizing about my days working in London, Paris and New York, an existence, if one could call it that, revolving around gastronomy of one kind or another. They paid me, not so very much as it happens, to do what I enjoy doing most in life. We all get to do it, but I was one of a fortunate few who made it his metier. Well all that's in the past now, but I still dream of my time in Paris when lunch was a tad short of 2-hours, little-known local bistros remained affordable until the day they were discovered by La Bible (Michelin Guide) and the students were revolting - this was the summer of '68, for heaven's sake. Someone should open bistro here in Bangkok with a table d'hote of Soupe a l'Oignon gratinee, Blanquette de Veau, a stinky Epoisses and Tarte Tatin to finsih with creme fraiche. Ah, it's back to lockdown and pad Thai. 
    • By KennethT
      I was thinking of doing a food blog of my recent trip through parts of New Zealand's south island.  Most of the food we had was nothing spectacular, but the experiences and various scenery we had over the trip were amazing.  Is there any interest in this?
    • By Melania
      It's one o'clock on a warm summer's day in Florence, I'm on my way to get ingredients for lunch. The sun is high in the sky, the cobblestones are warm under my feet and the aroma of something delicious is in the air. My mind starts to drift to the onions, celery and tomatoes I need for my pasta sauce, oh and don't forget something sweet for dessert...this truly is la dolce vita.
       
      My thoughts are soon interrupted by an unwelcome "chiuso" sign on the door of my new favorite deli. The blinds are closed and the friendly owners are nowhere in sight. The reality of having my favorite pasta dish for lunch was slipping further and further away.
       
       
      What a nightmare! How can this be?
        A local passing by must have noticed my frustration.   "Signorina, è riposo. Tutto è chiuso!"
        Of course! How could I forget about the sacred Italian siesta?
        A siesta or riposo, as most Italians call it, is a time of rest. This time is usually around midday, or the hottest part of the day (very inconvenient if you're craving a bowl of pasta.) No one can really say where the tradition of the siesta originates, but many say it's all about food (no surprises there really).
        For many Italian families the main meal of the day is lunch. This heavy meal in the middle of the day is attributed to the standard Mediterranean diet: A minuscule breakfast of a coffee and pastry , a heavy lunch and an evening meal around 10 o'clock. The logic is that after such a heavy meal one would surely be drowsy and need to rest, no one can work efficiently on a full stomach!
        Post offices, car rentals, supermarkets and even coffee shops (in some smaller towns police stations too) all close their doors for a riposo. Everything comes to a standstill as every Italian goes home to kick of their shoes, enjoy a homemade lunch with family and bask in the Italian sunshine for three to four hours. This is serious business. One would not dare work for 8 hours straight. After their riposo most businesses open again around 4 o'clock and stay open till 7pm. Its the perfect balance between work and play and does wonders for your digestive system!
        "Grazie!" I thanked her for the reminder. The midday sun started to become unbearable. The streets had cleared with only a few tourists braving the midday heat still around. I thought about the strawberries I bought from the market earlier that week. Strawberries for lunch on my shaded balcony and maybe a nap afterwards sounded like my perfect riposo. The pasta will have to wait till 4.
               
           
    • By KennethT
      OK.... here we go again!!!  While this post is a bit premature (we don't take off until around 1:30AM tonight), I am extremely excited so I figured I'd just set up the topic now.  As in previous foodblogs, I may post a bit from time to time while we're there, depending on how good my internet connection is, and how much free time I have... but the bulk of posting will really get started around July 9th - the day after we get home (hopefully without too much jetlag!!!)
    • By KennethT
      Happy New Year!  I'm sitting at the gate waiting for my flight from Saigon to NYC connecting through Taipei so I figured this would be a good opportunity to get started... But this is just the intro- the rest will gave to wait until I land about 22 hours from now, sleep for about 12 hours, then get my photos in order! We had a great week enjoying beautiful weather, taking in the frenetic yet relaxed street life and eating some amazing local food...
      Our flight here was on EVA Airline and was very pleasant and uneventful. Our flight from Nyc to Taipei left around 12:20 AM on the 24th. I love those night flights since it makes it very easy to get a decent amount of sleep, even in coach. EVAs food is quite good eith both Chinese and western choices for dinner and breakfast, and they came through several times with snacks such as a fried chicken sandwich with some kind of mustard. I think I had 4 of them!
      Once I get home, I'll continue posting with pics from our feast in the Taipei airport.... Spoiler: those who have read my Singapore foodblog from July may see a slight trend...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...