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brucesw

brucesw

I first had sabich almost a decade ago at an Israeli restaurant near me.  I got it as a plate with chopped, roasted (I think) eggplant, hummus and Israeli salad (diced tomato, cucumber, green bell pepper), a hard boiled egg and a thick, warm, fluffy pita.  I made pita sandwiches out of it and I loved it; their pitas are excellent.  The hot sauce accompanying it I judged to be harissa since I've never heard of schug but I later saw it elsewhere on the menu and found the Sabra product in  the Kosher section of a nearby grocery store.  The Sabra schug (red or green) is a thick, rather dry paste-like product but what I had at the restaurant was flowable.  I've also had it there as a sandwich on a baguette, with thick slices of eggplant plus tomato and cucumber.and hard-boiled egg  They also offer it as a pita sandwich and a wrap with malawach, the fried Yemeni bread similar to porotta but made with phyllo, I think.  I see places online giving the pronunciation as sabikh but that place said it was sah BEECH.  So far as I can recall, there was no amba.  I'll have to look for that at the grocery store.

 

I see another Israeli restaurant nearby has added it to the menu also as a pita sandwich, on a baguette and as a wrap in lafa, the Iraqi flatbread.  Their lafas are so big I probably wouldn't be able to finish one at one sitting.

 

Serious Eats did a recent feature on sabich and I agree, it's far superior to falafel.

brucesw

brucesw

I first had sabich almost a decade ago at an Israeli restaurant near me.  I got it as a plate with chopped, roasted (I think) eggplant, hummus and Israeli salad (diced tomato, cucumber, green bell pepper), a hard boiled egg and a thick, warm, fluffy pita.  I made pita sandwiches out of it and I loved it; their pitas are excellent.  The hot sauce accompanying it I judged to be harissa since I've never heard of schug but I later saw it elsewhere on the menu and found the Sabra product in  the Kosher section of a nearby grocery store.  The Sabra schug (red or green) is a thick, rather dry paste-like product but what I had at the restaurant was flowable.  I've also had it there as a sandwich on a baguette, with thick slices of eggplant plus tomato and cucumber.and hard-boiled egg  They also offer it as a pita sandwich and a wrap with malawach, the fried Yemeni bread similar to porotta but made with phyllo, I think.  I see places on line giving the pronunciation as sabikh but that place said it was sah BEECH.  So far as I can recall, there was no amba.  I'll have to look for that at the grocery store.

 

I see another Israeli restaurant nearby has added it to the menu also as a pita sandwich, on a baguette and as a wrap in lafa, the Iraqi flatbread.  Their lafas are so big I probably wouldn't be able to finish one at one sitting.

 

Serious Eats did a recent feature on sabich and I agree, it's far superior to falafel.

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