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shain

Olive oil and lemon Biscotti with pistachios and almonds

5 posts in this topic

Makes 40 cookies, 2 loaves. 

 

50-60 g very aromatic olive oil
80 g honey 
120 to 150 g sugar (I use 120 because I like it only gently sweet) 
2 eggs
2 teaspoons of fine lemon zest, from apx 1 lemon 
230 g flour 
1 teaspoon salt 
1 teaspoon baking powder 
75 g lightly toasted peeled pistachios
50 g lightly toasted almonds (you can replace some with pine nuts) 
Optional: a little rosemary or anise seed
Optional: more olive oil for brushing

 

Heat oven to 170 deg C.
In mixer (or by hand), mix oil, honey, sugar, lemon, egg and if desired, the optional spices - until uniform. 
Separately mix together the flour, salt and baking powder. 
Add flour mixture to mixer bowel with liquids and fold until uniform. Dough will be sticky and quite stiff. Don't knead or over mix. 
Add nuts and fold until well dispersed. 
On a parchment lined baking tray, create two even loaves of dough. 
With moist hands, shape each to be rectangular and somewhat flat - apx 2cm heigh, 6cm wide and 25cm long. 
Bake 25 to 30 minutes until golden and baked throughout, yet somewhat soft and sliceable. Rotate pan if needed for even baking. 
Remove from tray and let chill slightly or completely. 
Using a sharp serrated knife, gently slice to thin 1/2 cm thick cookies. Each loaf should yield 20 slices. 
Lay slices on tray and bake for 10 minutes. Flip and bake for another 10-15 minutes until complelty dry and lightly golden. 
Brush with extra olive oil, if desired. This will and more olive flavor. 
Let chill completely before removing from tray. 
Cookies keep well in a closed container and are best served with desert wines or herbal tea. 

 

  DSCF5846.JPGDSCF5849.JPG

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~ Shai N.

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Shain ... Is this a family recipe, a modified one from another source or one you devised completely on your own? The biscotti look scrumptious.

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@Deryn thank you very much. This is my recipe, which was based on the recipe I use for choclate Biscotti, which is in turn a modified version of this recipe this recipe

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~ Shai N.

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Shain, thanks so much, planning to make them soon!


Edited by Katie Meadow (log)
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4 hours ago, Katie Meadow said:

Shain, thanks so much, planning to make them soon!

 

 

I really hope you will enjoy them! Tell me how it went out when you do.


~ Shai N.

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