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Thanks for the Crepes

Thanks for the Crepes

15 hours ago, Deryn said:

Whether their 'marketing lies' constitute legal fraud in today's world (where everyone is doing it) is questionable. It is rare (does it even really happen?) for anyone to be prosecuted for menu lies. A farmer purporting to sell organic produce however may be held to account - but not a restaurant that says they serve organic.

 

Here's one local case (not a restaurant, but a purveyor of gluten free products) that was prosecuted with a very harsh sentence of 9-11 years handed down. I'm pretty sure there's more to the story than can be found in the article, because a prosecution like this is extremely rare. He ruffled some powerful feathers somewhere, I suspect. One does not do that here.

 

But you are right Deryn, about most lies, fraud and big white collar theft not being prosecuted today. It's just the normal SOP for doing business today. :(

 

There are some of us left that remember when people took pride in their work and product, and their reputation. Now even when they are caught, they shrug/laugh it off and go on as usual. The authorities usually ignore it too.

 

I do have one personal success story here locally with food fraud. A local low cost grocery chain which shall not be named was pouring up to a pint of water into large, four or more pound packages of chicken parts. They have to put those horrible large diaper things under the chicken now to absorb the exudate that oozes out of the perfectly legal "up to x% solution" that has been injected to ostensibly make the chicken moist and tender, but is really done to drive up the chargeable weight.  Some of the stores, to one extent or another were taking advantage of this and obviously adding water to the packages.

 

I got angry and sick of it as it escalated and they kept getting away with this flagrant fraud. I called whatever passes for the Bureau of Weights and Measures in NC after looking around on line. I did not expect results, but shortly after my call, the practice disappeared, although there was nothing in the news, and the stores go on as usual.

 

So maybe if people begin to speak up, instead of just thinking, "Everyone does it, what can I do?" small changes can be chipped away, even in these Hell-in-a-handbasket times.

 

 

Thanks for the Crepes

Thanks for the Crepes

14 hours ago, Deryn said:

Whether their 'marketing lies' constitute legal fraud in today's world (where everyone is doing it) is questionable. It is rare (does it even really happen?) for anyone to be prosecuted for menu lies. A farmer purporting to sell organic produce however may be held to account - but not a restaurant that says they serve organic.

 

Here's one local case (not a restaurant, but a purveyor of gluten free products) that was prosecuted with a very harsh sentence of 9-11 years handed down. I'm pretty sure there's more to the story than can be found in the article, because a prosecution like this is extremely rare. He ruffled some powerful feathers somewhere, I suspect. One does not do that here.

 

But you are right Deryn, about most lies, fraud and big white collar theft not being prosecuted today. It's just the normal SOP for doing business today. :(

 

There are some of us left that remember when people took pride in their work and product, and their reputation. Now even when they are caught, they shrug/laugh it off and go on as usual. The authorities usually ignore it too.

 

I do have one personal success story here locally with food fraud. A local low cost grocery chain which shall not be named was pouring up to a pint of water into large, four or more pound packages of chicken parts. They have to put those horrible large diaper things under the chicken now to absorb the exudate that oozes out of the perfectly legal "up to x% solution" that has been injected to ostensibly make the chicken moist and tender, but is really done to drive up the chargeable weight.  Some of the stores, to one extent or another were taking advantage of this and obviously adding water to the packages.

 

I got angry and sick of it as it escalated and they kept getting away with this flagrant fraud. I called whatever passes for the Bureau of Weights and Measures in NC after looking around on line. I did not expect results, but shortly after my call, the practice disappeared, although there was nothing in the news, and the stores go on as usual.

 

So maybe if people begin to speak up, instead of just thinking, "Everyone does it, what can I do?" small changed can be chipped away, even in these Hell-in-a-handbasket times.

 

 

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