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Deryn

Deryn

In northern climes, where fresh vegetables (unless grown in a specialized greenhouse environment) are purported to be 'local', they had better be in some 'preserved' form when served in winter for me to even begin to believe they are still 'local'. They could be organic (maybe) however but I don't know one would 'prove' that. People who dine and/or run restaurants really need to think before they eat or write their menus - and, if you vary the menu by season, you are more likely to have people buy into the 'local' part at least.

 

But, really I don't think most people even care any more. Except in very high priced places, where there is a reasonable expectation for truth in advertising, and delivery of a high quality product, most probably don't 'expect' the flowery descriptions on menus to be anywhere near accurate (other than when it comes to taste and texture and comfort on the plate).

 

And, even with air transportation these days, 'fresh' ocean fish served in the heartland is a bit beyond my ability to fully believe in. Lobster in a tank by the door is not even guaranteed to be really 'fresh' (strange as that may seem) since I know they can be held that way a long time - and in my experience here where I have tried 'fresh' live lobsters both right from the ocean, as well as well out of season but held in tanks, doing that changes the taste/texture, not to mention that even in season one gets very different tastes/textures based on whether the lobster is hard or soft shelled (just molted) at the moment. And yet most menus where lobster is served say the same thing about their lobster all year long.

 

Common sense (which is not so common any more) and a life of eating experience go a long way towards one's ability to discern truth from 'marketing fiction' in my humble opinion. Believing that everyone else will tell the truth is foolish. Whether their 'marketing lies' constitute legal fraud in today's world (where everyone is doing it) is questionable. It is rare (does it even really happen?) for anyone to be prosecuted for menu lies. A farmer purporting to sell organic produce however may be held to account - but not a restaurant that says they serve organic. Right or wrong, it is what it is. As I said, slippery slope - and the result of same.

 

The more I think about it, I think this particular reviewer was just stretching for a 'story' for want of anything else distinctive to report about at the time - even at the expense of making themselves look a bit ignorant by claiming that they were astonished at the 'fraud' that might be going on in the restaurant business.

Deryn

Deryn

In northern climes, where fresh vegetables (unless grown in a specialized greenhouse environment) are purported to be 'local', they had better be in some 'preserved' form when served in winter for me to even begin to believe they are still 'local'. They could be organic (maybe) however but I don't know one would 'prove' that. People who dine and/or run restaurants really need to think before they eat or write their menus - and, if you vary the menu by season, you are more likely to have people buy into the 'local' part at least.

 

But, really I don't think most people even care any more. Except in very high priced places, where there is a reasonable expectation for truth in advertising, and delivery of a high quality product, most probably don't 'expect' the flowery descriptions on menus to be anywhere near accurate (other than when it comes to taste and texture and comfort on the plate).

 

And, even with air transportation these days, 'fresh' ocean fish served in the heartland is a bit beyond my ability to fully believe in. Lobster in a tank by the door is not even guaranteed to be really 'fresh' (strange as that may seem) since I know they can be held that way a long time - and in my experience here where I have tried 'fresh' live lobsters both right from the ocean, as well as well out of season but held in tanks, doing that changes the taste/texture, not to mention that even in season one gets very different tastes/textures based on whether the lobster is hard or soft shelled (just molted) at the moment. And yet most menus where lobster is served say the same thing about their lobster all year long.

 

Common sense (which is not so common any more) and a life of eating experience go a long way towards one's ability to discern truth from 'marketing fiction' in my humble opinion. Believing that everyone else will tell the truth is foolish. Whether their 'marketing lies' constitute legal fraud in today's world (where everyone is doing it) is questionable. It is rare (does it even really happen?) for anyone to be prosecuted for menu lies. A farmer purporting to sell organic produce however may be held to account - but not a restaurant that says they serve organic. Right or wrong, that is what it is. As I said, slippery slope - and the result of same.

 

The more I think about it, I think this particular reviewer was just stretching for a 'story' for want of anything else distinctive to report about at the time - even at the expense of making themselves look a bit ignorant by claiming that they were astonished at the 'fraud' that might be going on in the restaurant business.

Deryn

Deryn

In northern climes, where fresh vegetables (unless grown in a specialized greenhouse environment) are purported to be 'local', they had better be in some 'preserved' form when served in winter for me to even begin to believe they are still 'local'. They could be organic (maybe) however but I don't know one would 'prove' that. People who dine and/or run restaurants really need to think before they eat or write their menus - and, if you vary the menu by season, you are more likely to have people buy into the 'local' part at least.

 

But, really I don't think most people even care any more. Except in very high priced places, where there is a reasonable expectation for truth in advertising, and delivery of a high quality product, most probably don't 'expect' the flowery descriptions on menus to be anywhere near accurate (other than when it comes to taste and texture and comfort on the plate).

 

And, even with air transportation these days, 'fresh' ocean fish served in the heartland is a bit beyond my ability to fully believe in. Lobster in a tank by the door is not even guaranteed to be really 'fresh' (strange as that may seem) since I know they can be held that way a long time - and in my experience here where I have tried 'fresh' live lobsters both right from the ocean, as well as well out of season but held in tanks, doing that changes the taste/texture, not to mention that even in season one gets very different tastes/textures based on whether the lobster is hard or soft shelled (just molted) at the moment. And yet most menus where lobster is served say the same thing about their lobster all year long.

 

Common sense (which is not so common any more) and a life of eating experience go a long way towards one's ability to discern truth from 'marketing fiction' in my humble opinion. Believing that everyone else will tell the truth is foolish. Whether their 'marketing lies' constitute legal fraud in today's world (where everyone is doing it) is questionable. As I said, slippery slope - and the result of same.

 

The more I think about it, I think this particular reviewer was just stretching for a 'story' for want of anything else distinctive to report about at the time - even at the expense of making themselves look a bit ignorant by claiming that they were astonished at the 'fraud' that might be going on in the restaurant business. It is rare (does it even really happen?) for anyone to be prosecuted for menu lies. A farmer purporting to sell organic produce however may be held to account - but not a restaurant that says they serve organic. Right or wrong, that is what it is.

Deryn

Deryn

In northern climes, where fresh vegetables (unless grown in a specialized greenhouse environment) are purported to be 'local', they had better be in some 'preserved' form when served in winter for me to even begin to believe they are still 'local'. They could be organic (maybe) however but I don't know one would 'prove' that. People who dine and/or run restaurants really need to think before they eat or write their menus - and, if you vary the menu by season, you are more likely to have people buy into the 'local' part at least.

 

But, really I don't think most people even care any more. Except in very high priced places, where there is a reasonable expectation for truth in advertising, and delivery of a high quality product, most probably 'expect' the flowery descriptions on menus to be anywhere near accurate (other than when it comes to taste and texture and comfort on the plate).

 

And, even with air transportation these days, 'fresh' ocean fish served in the heartland is a bit beyond my ability to fully believe in. Lobster in a tank by the door is not even guaranteed to be really 'fresh' (strange as that may seem) since I know they can be held that way a long time - and in my experience here where I have tried 'fresh' live lobsters both right from the ocean, as well as well out of season but held in tanks, doing that changes the taste/texture, not to mention that even in season one gets very different tastes/textures based on whether the lobster is hard or soft shelled (just molted) at the moment. And yet most menus where lobster is served say the same thing about their lobster all year long.

 

Common sense (which is not so common any more) and a life of eating experience go a long way towards one's ability to discern truth from 'marketing fiction' in my humble opinion. Believing that everyone else will tell the truth is foolish. Whether their 'marketing lies' constitute legal fraud in today's world (where everyone is doing it) is questionable. As I said, slippery slope - and the result of same.

 

The more I think about it, I think this particular reviewer was just stretching for a 'story' for want of anything else distinctive to report about at the time - even at the expense of making themselves look a bit ignorant by claiming that they were astonished at the 'fraud' that might be going on in the restaurant business. It is rare (does it even really happen?) for anyone to be prosecuted for menu lies. A farmer purporting to sell organic produce however may be held to account - but not a restaurant that says they serve organic. Right or wrong, that is what it is.

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