Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Cineris

Chinese sizzling beef

Recommended Posts

At the local chinese restaurant they have an amazing beef, and I'm trying to figure out the recipe. I've been searching the net for similar recipes, but could only find black bean sauce recipes. I'm pretty sure it's neither black bean sauce or pepper sauce, as these are dishes on their own. It's served in a hot pan, with onions or shallots, leeks, bells peppers and a lot of garlic. The sauce is dark in colour. Any help is greatly appreciated.

A guy on another forum was talking about douchi and tian mian jiang, but then again, these are bean bases. Haven't had a chance to try it out though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can easily put together a sauce using the following: oyster sauce, soy sauce, rice wine, a little broth or water, a little sesame oil if you think that flavor complements the dish or reminds you of the one you had. See how that goes and then start messing with the ingredients or the ratio of ingredients to make adjustments. That's just a very basic non-bean based sauce. If oyster sauce doesn't seem right, you might try hoisin sauce instead, but--just a guess here--it is more likely oyster sauce was used. For a basic beef stir-fry I would probably use oyster sauce for a bit of body.

 

If the dish was simply called sizzling beef you might look up other sizzling recipes and get ideas for the technique as well.


Edited by Katie Meadow (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The usual Chinese name for this dish is 铁板牛肉 tiě bǎn niú ròu which literally translates as "iron plate beef". A Google search for "iron plate beef" brings up a few recipes such as this and this.
 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Forgot to mention. Already tried to make it with basic soy/oyster sauce. Not the same. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, liuzhou said:

The usual Chinese name for this dish is 铁板牛肉 tiě bǎn niú ròu which literally translates as "iron plate beef". A Google search for "iron plate beef" brings up a few recipes such as this and this.
 

And you are correct. I think this is the dish I'm looking for. Though just searching for iron plate beef doesn't really help me a lot. I tried searching for  铁板牛肉 and this is definitely the one. A little hard to find a decent recipe, even with google translate. Anyone who can help me out finding a really good recipe for this?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tried making yesterday using a black bean base. Definitely not it either. As stated before, it just tasted like the black bean dish.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Cineris said:

Tried making yesterday using a black bean base. Definitely not it either. As stated before, it just tasted like the black bean dish.  

 

So beef cooked in black bean sauce tastes like beef cooked in black bean sauce. Who'd have thunk it?

 

As has been said before, the iron plate beef is normally a simple stir fry with peppers and aliums (leeks, onions, shallots, garlic) of your choice in oyster sauce, The iron plate is purely for presentation.

 

I'm not sure what you mean by a basic soy/oyster sauce.

 

Perhaps if you detail the soy/oyster sauce recipe you used, we may spot what's missing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is the meat velveted?

Other than that, the description is much like that for 'pepper steak'. One thing to remember is that different brands of soy sauce and oyster sauce, etc. taste different from each other. Next time you eat at the restaurant, try asking what brands they use.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps try googling Mongolian beef?  And to add to Lisa Shock's suggestion - black pepper steak or Chinese pepper steak?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

So beef cooked in black bean sauce tastes like beef cooked in black bean sauce. Who'd have thunk it?

 

As has been said before, the iron plate beef is normally a simple stir fry with peppers and aliums (leeks, onions, shallots, garlic) of your choice in oyster sauce, The iron plate is purely for presentation.

 

I'm not sure what you mean by a basic soy/oyster sauce.

 

Perhaps if you detail the soy/oyster sauce recipe you used, we may spot what's missing.

Beef/chicken broth, couple of tablespoons oyster and soy. Or skip the broth. Tried both. And yeah, I know the iron plate is for presentation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Lisa Shock said:

Is the meat velveted?

Other than that, the description is much like that for 'pepper steak'. One thing to remember is that different brands of soy sauce and oyster sauce, etc. taste different from each other. Next time you eat at the restaurant, try asking what brands they use.

The meat doesn't really matter. All I'm looking for is the sauce. The beef is shredded. I've tried using dark soy sauce and light sauce from Lee Kum Kee and from Kikkoman.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Beebs said:

Perhaps try googling Mongolian beef?  And to add to Lisa Shock's suggestion - black pepper steak or Chinese pepper steak?

Neither. It's not a pepper steak at all. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Cineris  

 

a picture of your dish would have been helpful.

 

other wise, well,  you are not going to get the help you ask for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Lisa Shock said:

But, velveting the meat does affect the sauce.

Aha, explain. Please. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Cineris said:

Beef/chicken broth, couple of tablespoons oyster and soy. Or skip the broth. Tried both. And yeah, I know the iron plate is for presentation.

 

I meant the recipe for the whole dish. But I'm beginning to see what may be the problem.

 

You are never going to replicate this dish if you insist on keeping the sauce separate from the other ingredients. Chinese cooking doesn't work that way. The sauce isn't something you pour over at the end. It is an integral part of the whole dish. The meat  partially cooks in the sauce, gaining from and contributing to the sauce. As do the other ingredients.

 

I've already given you links to recipes both in English and Chinese, but you seem to have rejected those because they don't include a separate sauce. They never will..

 

I'm done.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

I meant the recipe for the whole dish. But I'm beginning to see what may be the problem.

 

You are never going to replicate this dish if you insist on keeping the sauce separate from the other ingredients. Chinese cooking doesn't work that way. The sauce isn't something you pour over at the end. It is an integral part of the whole dish. The meat  partially cooks in the sauce, gaining from and contributing to the sauce. As do the other ingredients.

 

I've already given you links to recipes both in English and Chinese, but you seem to have rejected those because they don't include a separate sauce. They never will..

 

I'm done.

You're misunderstanding. Of course the other ingredients play an important role. The sauce wouldn't be at all the same without the garlic, leeks and onions. Though, I just thought the beef wouldn't really play a big role here.

And the post with the links and description was very helpful. I will continue trying and looking. Btw, the first link doesn't work. 


Edited by Cineris (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Lisa Shock said:

BTW, those random google images appear to show velveted beef, IMO.

Yeah, I think you are right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I gather you are in Norway (from the google search address). It is possible that the "local Chinese restaurant" may have adapted some of the ingredients to what is available locally in that part of Norway where you are?  Your posted stuff that you tried did not include rice wine. Perhaps, if you can get your hands on Shaohsing wine, you might try that and see if it gets closer to what you seek? Or - ask the restaurant - nicely - next time - what they put into it?

 

"Tit Pan Ngau Yook" is a dish that I grew up with in SE Asia, and each restaurant had its own version of the sauce and dish; including cases where the dish would be brought out to you as a completed dish on the still-sizzling iron plate, and others where the components (partially cooked) were assembled on the table in front of you on the very hot platter and the sauce poured onto it in front of you. Could it be possible that this particular restaurant simply had its version that you have "fixed" your desires on, not necessarily what the dish in a general sense may have suggested in a general sense as components for its execution?

 

BTW - what was the "regionality" or dialect group of the chef (or owners) of that restaurant? (Cantonese, Szechuanese, etc) It might have some bearing on this.


Edited by huiray (log)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's right, Norway. Not sure about the ingredients, but I really doubt they buy it locally, as the restaurant is located in what you probably would call a village. I know they travel to China, and you can get stuff sent from Oslo, which is where I'm located at the moment. Not easy for me to run back home to order the dish. That's why I can't provide pics or menu atm. Unfortunately I have not been able to get my hands on some Shaoxing wine yet, as the alcohol laws here are pretty strict, and expensive.
And I think you are very right about mentioning that the restaurant has it's very own version. Not just a general dish. That's why I'm searching all over the net. Maybe someone knows something. It's difficult.

 

The owners have lived in Norway since 2000, and they still do not speak the language. I asked one of their sons if he could ask about the recipe and explain it to me. He said it would be very difficult for him to translate it to Norwegian. I don't know if that's the truth, or if it's just a way to keep it a secret. I really doubt they are Szchuanese as their menu is not close to Szechuanese food.


Edited by Cineris (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Cineris said:

The owners have lived in Norway since 2000, and they still do not speak the language. I asked one of their sons if he could ask about the recipe and explain it to me. He said it would be very difficult for him to translate it to Norwegian. I don't know if that's the truth, or if it's just a way to keep it a secret. I really doubt they are Szchuanese as their menu is not close to Szechuanese food.

 

Thanks for the response. I would suspect they are more likely to be in the direction of Cantonese or southern Chinese, anyway...rather than Szechuanese, and your comment about the overall menu seems to suggest that.

 

No Shaohsing wine...OK, try some dry sherry (NOT my "best substitute recommendation", but it is in the generalized desired direction), or try some sake...


Edited by huiray (log)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By liuzhou
      While there have been other Chinese vegetable topics in the past, few of them were illustrated And some which were have lost those images in various "upgrades".
       
      What I plan to do is photograph every vegetable I see and say what it is, if I know. However, this is a formidable task so it'll take time. The problem is that so many vegetables go under many different Chinese names and English names adopted from one or other Chinese language, too. For example, I know four different words for 'potato' and know there are more. And there are multiple regional preference in nomenclature. Most of what you will see will be vegetables from supermarkets, where I can see the Chinese labelling. In "farmer's" or wet markets, there is no labelling and although, If I ask, different traders will have different names for the same vegetable. Many a time I've been supplied a name, but been unable to find any reference to it from Mr Google or his Chinese counterparts. Or if I find the Chinese, can't find an accepted translation so have to translate literally.
       
      Also, there is the problem that most of the names which are used in the English speaking countries have, for historical reasons, been adopted from Cantonese, whereas 90% of Chinese speak Mandarin (普通话 pǔ tōng huà). But I will do my best to supply as many alternative names as I can find. I shall also attempt to give Chinese names in simplified Chinese characters as used throughout mainland China and then in  traditional Chinese characters,  now mainly only used in Hong Kong, Taiwan and among much of the Chinese diaspora. If I only give one version, that means they are the same in Simp and Trad.
       
      I'll try to do at least one a day. Until I collapse under the weight of vegetation.
       
      Please, if you know any other names for any of these, chip in. Also, please point out any errors of mine.
       
      I'll start with bok choy/choy. This is and alternatives such as  pak choi or pok choi are Anglised attempts at the Cantonese pronunciation of the Mandarin! However in Cantonese it is more often 紹菜; Jyutping: siu6 coi3. In Chinese it is 白菜. Mandarin Pinyin 'bái cài'. This literally means 'white vegetable' but really just means 'cabbage' and of course there are many forms of cabbage. Merely asking for bái cài in many a Chinese store or restaurant will be met with blank stares and requests to clarify. From here on I'm just going to translate 白菜 as 'cabbage'.

      So, here we go.


       
      Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis
       
      This is what you may be served if you just ask for baicai. Or maybe not. In much of China it is 大白菜 dà bái cài meaning 'big cabbage'. In English, usually known as Napa cabbage, Chinese cabbage, celery cabbage, Chinese leaf, etc.  In Chinese, alternative names include 结球白菜 / 結球白菜 ( jié qiú bái cài ), literally knotted ball cabbage, but there are many more. 
       
      more soon
    • By liuzhou
      It is possibly not well-known that China has some wonderful hams, up there with the best that Spain can offer. This lack of wide -knowledge, at least in the USA, is mainly down to regulations forbidding their importation. However, for travellers to China and those in  places with less restrictive policies, here are some of the best.
       
      This article from the WSJ is a good introduction to one of the best - Xuanwei Ham 宣威火腿  (xuān wēi huǒ tuǐ) from Yunnan province.
      This Ingredient Makes Everything Better
      I can usually obtain Xuanwei ham here around the Chinese New Year/Spring Festival, but I also have a good friend who lives in Yunnan who sends me regular supplies. The article compares it very favourably with jamon iberico, a sentiment with which I heartily agree.



      Xuanwei Ham
       

      Xuanwei Ham
       
      more coming soon.
       
       
    • By liuzhou
      I have just returned home to China from an almost two week trip to Ho Chi Minh City (Saigon), Vietnam. To get there I first travelled by train to the provincial capital, Nanning. The local airport only does domestic flights, whereas there are direct flights from Nanning. The flight time required that I stay overnight at the Aviation Hotel in Nanning, from which there is a regular direct bus to the airport.
       
      The trip to Nanning is about an hour and a half and passes through some nice karst scenery.
       
       
      After booking into the hotel, I set off for my favourite Nanning eating destination. Zhongshan Night market is a well known spot and very popular with the locals. I had forgotten that it was a local holiday - the place is always busy, but that night it was exceptionally so.
       

       

       
      It consists of one long street with hundreds of stalls and is basically a seafood market, although there are a few stalls selling alternatives.
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      Filled myself with seafood (and some of that blood sausage above), slept soundly and, next morning, flew to Ho Chi Minh City.
       

       

       
      The rest of my trip can be seen here:
       
       
    • By Lisa Shock
      Years ago, when I visited Tokyo, I ate in a small but fascinating restaurant called 'It's Vegetable' which is now, unfortunately, closed. The chef was from Taiwan, and he made Buddhist vegetarian and vegan dishes that resembled meat. During my visit, several monks wearing robes stopped in to eat dinner. The dishes were pretty amazing. I understood some of them, like using seitan to mimic chicken in stir fry dishes, others used tofu products like yuba, but, others were complex and obviously difficult. One very notable dish we enjoyed was a large 'fish' fillet designed to serve several people. It had a 'skin' made of carefully layered 'scales' cut from nori and attached to the surface. Inside, the white 'flesh' flaked and tasted much like a mild fish. Anyway, apparently Buddhist fake meat meals are very popular in Taiwan and many places, cheap through to fine dining serve them. Yes, if I worked on it for a while, I could probably refine one or two dishes on my own, but, I am wondering if there's a Modernist Cuisine type cookbook for skillfully making these mock meats from scratch? (I have heard that some items are commercially made and available frozen there, much like soy-based burgers are in the US.) I am willing to try almost any offering, even if it's entirely in Chinese. And, I know how to use remailers to purchase regional items from the various local retailers worldwide who do not ship to the US.
    • By liuzhou
      Note: This follows on from the Munching with the Miao topic.
       
      The three-hour journey north from Miao territory ended up taking four, as the driver missed a turning and we had to drive on to the next exit and go back. But our hosts waited for us at the expressway exit and lead us up a winding road to our destination - Buyang 10,000 mu tea plantation (布央万亩茶园 bù yāng wàn mǔ chá yuán) The 'mu' is  a Chinese measurement of area equal to 0.07 of a hectare, but the 10,000 figure is just another Chinese way of saying "very large".
       
      We were in Sanjiang Dong Autonomous County, where 57% of the inhabitants are Dong.
       
      The Dong people (also known as the Kam) are noted for their tea, love of glutinous rice and their carpentry and architecture. And their hospitality. They tend to live at the foot of mountains, unlike the Miao who live in the mid-levels.
       
      By the time we arrived, it was lunch time, but first we had to have a sip of the local tea. This lady did the preparation duty.
       

       

       
      This was what we call black tea, but the Chinese more sensibly call 'red tea'. There is something special about drinking tea when you can see the bush it grew on just outside the window!
       
      Then into lunch:
       

       

      Chicken Soup
       

      The ubiquitous Egg and Tomato
       

      Dried fish with soy beans and chilli peppers. Delicious.
       

      Stir fried lotus root
       

      Daikon Radish
       

      Rice Paddy Fish Deep Fried in Camellia Oil - wonderful with a smoky flavour, but they are not smoked.
       

      Out of Focus Corn and mixed vegetable
       

      Fried Beans
       

      Steamed Pumpkin
       

      Chicken
       

      Beef with Bitter Melon
       

      Glutinous (Sticky) Rice
       

      Oranges
       

      The juiciest pomelo ever. The area is known  for the quality of its pomelos.
       
      After lunch we headed out to explore the tea plantation.
       

       

       

       

       
      Interspersed with the tea plants are these camellia trees, the seeds of which are used to make the Dong people's preferred cooking oil.
       

       
      As we climbed the terraces we could hear singing and then came across this group of women. They are the tea pickers. It isn't tea picking time, but they came out in their traditional costumes to welcome us with their call and response music. They do often sing when picking. They were clearly enjoying themselves.
       

       
      And here they are:
       
       
      After our serenade we headed off again, this time to the east and the most memorable meal of the trip. Coming soon.
       
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×