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Instant Pot. Multi-function cooker (Part 3)


rotuts
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Just saying........

 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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20 hours ago, ElsieD said:

Thanks, Shelby.  I gave some of my last batch to my polite sister who said "your yogurt is a little tangier than I am used to" and didn't ask for any more.  I'll shorten the time when I next make it and see how that works out.  I was under what seems to be the mistaken impression that the longer you let it incubate, the thicker it got.

Oh, trust me, I was too.  I actually checked it at about 3 hours...maybe a bit less and it was thick enough for me. 

 

If you do make a tangier batch it sure does well as a sub for sour cream.  Or in salad dressings.

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8 minutes ago, Shelby said:

Oh, trust me, I was too.  I actually checked it at about 3 hours...maybe a bit less and it was thick enough for me. 

 

If you do make a tangier batch it sure does well as a sub for sour cream.  Or in salad dressings.

 

This is what I have been doing:

3 3/4 cups 1% milk plus 1/4 cup whipping cream plus 1 T dried milk powder plus 1 Vanilla Bean.   Bring to boil.  Cool to 115.  Add yogurt, usually 2 T or so.  Press yogurt for 9 hours.   When finished, remove bean, scrape out beans into yogurt.  Stir well then strain.  I do the vanilla like that as my beans are dry and this reconstitutes them enough to get at the innards.  Do you do something differently?

 

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@ElsieD

 

I've only used whole milk.  Here's my process:

 

1/2 Gallon of whole milk

1 1/2 T. of dry milk

 

Whisk together in the IP.  Boil.  Cool to 115.

 

Mix in 10 grams of culture--I use freeze dried--this is the kind I use

 

Push yogurt--I checked after 3 hours and I liked it but let it go for 4.

 

Stir, then strain, then stir again.

 

 

Edited by Shelby (log)
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35 minutes ago, Shelby said:

@ElsieD

 

I've only used whole milk.  Here's my process:

 

1/2 Gallon of whole milk

1 1/2 T. of dry milk

 

Whisk together in the IP.  Boil.  Cool to 115.

 

Mix in 10 grams of culture--I use freeze dried--this is the kind I use

 

Push yogurt--I checked after 3 hours and I liked it but let it go for 4.

 

Stir, then strain, then stir again.

 

 

 

Thanks again.  I'll get some starter as I just found a store not far away that carries it.  I'll be curious to see if it makes a difference in the finished product.

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On 4/13/2016 at 9:28 AM, Shelby said:

Made another batch of yogurt yesterday in the IP.  I tasted it after 4 hours of it incubating and I decided that I like that flavor better than letting it go for 8.  Not as "sour".

Was going to ask about the thickness, and I see ElsieD beat me to it. 

On 4/13/2016 at 9:39 AM, kbjesq said:

What is "jail slaw"?  And sorry about your beans.  I have not yet had any problem using the IP to cook dry beans (no soak) and I hope that I never do.  And I do use Rancho Gordo beans but also cheap chickpeas and black beans (Goya) from my local supermarket.  With my luck, however, I'll probably have that problem for the first time when I've got company coming over. :(   

 

ETA:  I just read the posts about the molasses being acid.  I never thought about it so I looked it up and sure enough, molasses is usually around 5.2 - 5.7 pH.  Learn something new every day. :)  I have learned from past failures (decades ago) to never add anything but salt to dried beans before they reach the desired level of tenderness.  After they reach that point, I often add something acidic in order to prevent the skins from suffering from blow out, assuming that I intend to keep cooking them (e.g., Boston baked beans).

 

Jail slaw is a vinegar/sugar-based slaw seasoned with turmeric, dry mustard and white pepper. I love it, it keeps in the fridge forever, and it's great in place of lettuce on a BLT or with barbecue or other meat that tends toward greasy. If you want the recipe, PM me and I'll be happy to send it. So named because I learned to make it when I was a reporter covering criminal court cases, and we'd frequently eat lunch at the jail due to a lack of other options, and time constraints.

 

And I'm sure the bean issue was the molasses. I'd never thought about it either. I'll know better next time.

On 4/20/2016 at 7:15 PM, ElsieD said:

Thanks, Shelby.  I gave some of my last batch to my polite sister who said "your yogurt is a little tangier than I am used to" and didn't ask for any more.  I'll shorten the time when I next make it and see how that works out.  I was under what seems to be the mistaken impression that the longer you let it incubate, the thicker it got.

 

I'm fine with the tang of 8-hour yogurt, but the time factor is occasionally an issue for me. Think I'll try the four-hour tomorrow. I drain mine anyway, so if it'll not be any thinner than 8-hour -- and I couldn't stand a spoon up in mine, I don't think -- so I shouldn't lose as much volume to whey. I generally wind up with about a quart of yogurt from a half-gallon of milk after I drain for two or three hours. I use the same culture Shelby does.

Edited by kayb (log)
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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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I read most of the threads on IP  and I'm still not convinced I need one. These are my thoughts, could you help me thinking to some other reasons I need one of this?

 

I have a 6 Qt Kuhn Rikon. I used to have a smaller Lagostina which didn't reach the 15 psi but was much more gentle on vegetables. Now I need to replace that and I want as before another small pressure cooker. I loved to cook with my pressure cooker on the induction cook top because I could set the right temperature and time every time and have a consistent result. 

Now, since we moved to the US,  I'm back on gas and I need to watch what I have on the stove and often get distracted with the million other things I'm doing. So, I miss the induction for that. Also, if I didn't had problem with space and didn't mind spending the money, I'd like a small pressure cooker and a large pressure braiser with a wider base. I never owned a rice cooker or a slow cooker. 

If I'm honest the only appeal this IP cooker have for me is to be able to walk away from it and maybe a keep warm function if I don't feel to strain a stock right away but t..he dimension is the same as the Kuhn Rikon...

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Franci - Just because many of us now have an IP (or two) or the equivalent and love them, doesn't mean everyone HAS to have one or that they fit into everyone's lifestyle/cooking style. I don't think this particular appliance is going away any time soon - so take your time and continue to think about what it is YOU need or don't need. Over time too, your needs and wants may change.

 

I have found that I never use my regular (Fissler) pressure cookers any more, except occasionally as just a heavy pan to cook in on the stove if everything else is dirty. That is probably the case for a number of us who now have IPs. I have a set of two - a small one and a larger one. Perhaps we should donate our old pressure cookers to the 'undecided' or 'can't have an IP right now's' - like you - or you may want to look in thrift stores because as time goes on and more adopt this 'technology' you may find many 'old fashioned', non-electric pressure cookers for sale there.

 

In other words, I won't try to convince you to buy an IP. I am happy with mine but I am no evangelist. I will say however that there is a slightly smaller version of the IP (most of us have 6 quart ones, but there is a 5 quart Duo as well). IF you decide to buy one, I would recommend the 7-in-1 Duo version in whatever size fits your needs, as I think it has the most versatility.

 

eta: If you also use a slow cooker, or slow cook anything, or a rice cooker, or make yogourt, you may want to consider that those functions are possible with an IP - so you could free up a bit of storage space over time by using just one appliance to accomplish all those tasks.

Edited by Deryn (log)
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Yes, the IP is certainly worth the money,but it sounds like the main reason for your post is wanting that "walk away and forget" that you no longer have with gas. I might suggest you look at a counter-top induction burner such as:

 

DUXTOP 1800-Watt Portable Induction Cooktop Countertop Burner 9100MC

 

15 power levels from 200-1800Watts; 15 temperature range from 140°F to 460°F  - very highly rated and will store easily in a cupboard. Considerably less than an IP and can easily be taken out to patio/deck to use while bbqing for sides. If you wish to replace your Logastino with another of the same you should get the same result.

 

p

Edited by Smithy
Adjusted link to be Amazon-friendly (log)
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 So I suspect my big upright freezer in the basement is about to fail.   Having lived through the horror of a failed chest freezer full of rotting animal products I am anxious to get everything out of there,.  My archeological dig turned up a brisket from Wegmans complete with the spice package to make corned beef.   But everyone knows that you cannot eat corned beef if it isn't St. Patrick's Day:D.  What to do? What to do? Well it is in the Instant Pot as we speak using the slow cooker mode and I hope in eight hours time I will have something that resembles Beef Barbacoa. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Just for fun, I made banana bread in the IP yesterday.  I don't have a bundt type pan that will fit in there so I had to use my cheesecake pan.  I suspect that's why 30 mins on high with NR wasn't enough to get the middle done.  I put it back in for another 15 mins and it came out done.  It's not pretty but it tastes good.

 

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This semester, my husband the chemistry professor is teaching a science class for honors students who are not necessarily science majors, and he's using food as the focus of the class. Yesterday he brought the Instant Pot to work, along with carnaroli rice, diced onion, shredded cheese, carrot juice, and other ingredients, and made a vegetarian risotto, which the class devoured. Did I mention this was an 8 AM class?

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MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

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My apologies to all the IP enthusiast for my request :

 

Ive lost many of my notes   ( recently a flurry of Post-Its ) as for a few months ive been overwhelmed with ' paper ' that Ive been dealing with.

 

Ive misplaced my Red Notebook, but its been recently found.

 

however, Ive never made notes in that book on HB eggs etc.

 

Ive tried to look this up on the """  fabulous *** IP's many threads

 

[ed.: yep, its all here in eG ....  if its worthwhile and important  SV, IP etc ]

 

but lost my way

 

Id very much appreciate a very brief recap if you do HB eggs in the IP

 

I know AnnaN lead the way, but many followed, including myself.

 

Id like to hear how you do them,  '  traditional  ' HB's  i.e. firm yolk.   IP HB's with a tinny less firm-ness

 

etc.

 

I do recall, someone, perhaps AnnaN used a pressure - steam  method that was Low Pressure ?

 

anyway, Id appreciate your help.

 

I promise to add your notes to the Red IP Notebooks.

 

after all, its Potato Salad Season !

 

[ed.: always somewhere for the PSS.]

 

many thanks

 

PS  somewhere in the IP threads is the method Ive used myself  But I cant find it

 

O.o

 

Id like to amend my request a tiny bit :  eggs in the shell in the IP

 

Shelby had some nice ones just today for "" Noodle-y soup ""  with the yolks Just Right for that 

 

so  eggs, in the shell  would be very much appreciated.

 

 

Edited by rotuts (log)
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@rotuts

 

 This is copied from the first part of this topic because I find linking very frustrating 

 

The eggs are not particularly fresh but they are farm not supermarket eggs. I have no idea how they might have been sized so I weighed each egg. One weighed 61 g and the other 63 g. I found a couple of caps from liquor bottles which served as their perches in the rather substantial steamer basket I found at an Asian store on Monday. 

I put a cup of water in the IP, added the steamer basket and the bottle caps and settled the eggs comfortably. I set the pressure to low, the time to five minutes and allowed the pressure to drop by itself before opening the pressure cooker. I lifted the eggs out with a clean towel and put them in an ice bath.

 

 Edited to add this was for hard-boiled eggs 

Edited by Anna N (log)
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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Broke out another corned beef from the freezer from the St Patty's day sale and had a corned beef dinner from the IP. I added the usual spice package included with the beef, along with a few bay leaves, mustard seeds and a quarter cup of Crystal hot sauce. This was a big one, so manual for 2 hours and quick released. Added the cabbage, carrots and potatoes for 10 minutes and quick released. This was a winner (even though I was a loser on my Kentucky Derby picks). The sandwiches with baby swiss on marble rye are on my radar!

HC

 

IMG_0697.JPG

Edited by HungryChris (log)
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The IP has had a workout today. A batch of yogurt, followed by a half-pound of RG yellow-eye beans, which are now BACK in the IP to slow cook all night in the sauce ingredients for Boston baked beans. 

 

Also, in rereading the recipe for BB Beans on the Hip Pressure Cooking website, I figured out a significant thing I missed. The recipe calls for soda, which I don't think I added when I had the adventure with them being so tough. That would, obviously, have neutralized the acid in the molasses. 

 

Duh! Helps to read the recipe THOROUGHLY.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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This AM, another batch of ricotta.  

 

For lunch, I used the leftover ricotta whey to make an asparagus risotto with mushrooms and shrimp.  I was inspired by this post: Asparagus Spring Risotto & making micro stock on hippressurecooking.com, though I didn't adhere exactly to the recipe.  I liked the idea of using the asparagus trimmings to flavor stock for risotto but didn't want the asparagus in the risotto to be cooked quite so long so I just used the tough asparagus ends, mushroom stems and a few dried mushrooms pressure cooked in whey for the "micro stock" that I strained before adding it to the rice.  I roasted the rest of the asparagus and sautéed the sliced mushrooms while the rice was cooking and added them, along with the shrimp after the pressure was released.

 

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Thanks to all of you egulleters,  I am now the proud owner of one of these handy machines that I would never have come across without these wonderful threads!  My slowcooker bit the dust a couple of weeks ago and DH said why don't you get one of those machines you talked about from egullet. 

 

I am really liking the Instant pot and will have to review all the notes to see what everyone has done with it.

 

What I really like is my DH has taken to experimenting with the Instant pot too and tonight was his first attempt at stew in the slow cooker.  He sauteed the meat and onions and added the rest of the ingredients, put it on slow cooker and went to work.  He didn't know that the default time was only four hours on the slow cooker setting and we got home after 8 hours.  I see the clock reads 4:36 when I get in and realize that it has been off for four hours and 36 minutes...Oh Oh I think, dinner may be something else if it has cooled that long.

 

I got the thermometer out, lifted the lid and it read 167F!  This machine has been so well made and is decently insulated that it held the temperature for over four hours.  Now I don't recommend this technique but it has been a pleasant surprise to find that what I thought was a big mistake turned out to be a perfectly cooked stew and a DH rather pleased with the new addition to the kitchen. 

 

Thanks guys!  Now I have some reading to catch up on, and some counter space to fill up!

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