Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Whence collards?


DougL
 Share

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

To my knowledge I have never tasted collards.  I might even like them.

 

They are a strong green, but to me much milder than mustard or kale.  I detest kale and only like mustard if it is mixed with turnip or collard greens.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Y'all may have my share of all the collards in the world, as well as the turnip greens, kale and poke "sallet." I will cook and eat enough of the obligatory greens at New Year's to satisfy the Gods of Good Luck, and they will be mustard, as that is the only kind of cooked green I can tolerate even that much of. Granted, it may need to be a larger than usual serving this year, to make up for 2020.

 

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, kayb said:

Y'all may have my share of all the collards in the world, as well as the turnip greens, kale and poke "sallet."

Wow. Of all the people I would never have guessed that you might be anti collard. I cannot explain why this would be but it is a fact. 

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, kayb said:

Y'all may have my share of all the collards in the world, as well as the turnip greens, kale and poke "sallet." I will cook and eat enough of the obligatory greens at New Year's to satisfy the Gods of Good Luck, and they will be mustard, as that is the only kind of cooked green I can tolerate even that much of. Granted, it may need to be a larger than usual serving this year, to make up for 2020.

 

 

Well the different elements have different meanings so if you can do the peas I think it covers and the pig for forward positive movement. The wiki explanation tracks what I was always told. 

 

from wiki: The peas, since they swell when cooked, symbolize prosperity; the greens symbolize money; the pork, because pigs root forward when foraging, represents positive motion. Cornbread, which represents gold, also often accompanies this meal.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, kayb said:

Y'all may have my share of all the collards in the world, as well as the turnip greens, kale and poke "sallet." I will cook and eat enough of the obligatory greens at New Year's to satisfy the Gods of Good Luck, and they will be mustard, as that is the only kind of cooked green I can tolerate even that much of. Granted, it may need to be a larger than usual serving this year, to make up for 2020.

 

I feel the same way about bourbon and live under threat to have my GRITS card revoked.  I assume you live under the same threat for the collard hate.  😁

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My sister-in-law found out the hard way that when you're ordering your BBQ to go, you don't call them "collards". In the very loud restaurant, it's too easily mixed up with "cobbler" which was also on the menu and it's what she ended up with when she got home with her ribs and brisket.

She found out later that when you order them you have to call them "greens" or else you end up with dessert like she did. xD

  • Like 1
  • Haha 3

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My mom was from North Carolina, and collards and hamhocks, boiled beyond recognition, were a thing. I grew up hating collard greens. It was only as an adult, when I had them prepared differently, that I liked them.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

I love greens of all sorts including those more on the possibly bitter spectrum. Leaving the mainstream market today there was a bin of 99 cents for 2 lbs bags of collards.Considerong current produce prices, I had to grab one. I don't normally buy cut bagged greens like this but I thought worth a try.  May go super simple with andouille sausagefor flavor and fat and water to bring together. Maybe tomorrow. Wish I had ,akings for cornbread but rice will have to do.

IMG_1855.jpg

IMG_1854.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, heidih said:

I love greens of all sorts including those more on the possibly bitter spectrum. Leaving the mainstream market today there was a bin of 99 cents for 2 lbs bags of collards.Considerong current produce prices, I had to grab one. I don't normally buy cut bagged greens like this but I thought worth a try.  May go super simple with andouille sausagefor flavor and fat and water to bring together. Maybe tomorrow. Wish I had ,akings for cornbread but rice will have to do.

IMG_1855.jpg

IMG_1854.jpg

 

Greens stewed for a few hours with pork, a little heat, chicken broth, onion garlic and white wine are a simple blessing.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, heidih said:

I love greens of all sorts including those more on the possibly bitter spectrum. Leaving the mainstream market today there was a bin of 99 cents for 2 lbs bags of collards.Considerong current produce prices, I had to grab one. I don't normally buy cut bagged greens like this but I thought worth a try.  May go super simple with andouille sausagefor flavor and fat and water to bring together. Maybe tomorrow. Wish I had ,akings for cornbread but rice will have to do.

IMG_1855.jpg

IMG_1854.jpg

I'm with you on that. Kale, collards, escarole, arugula, radicchio and dandelion greens when they're properly prepared.

Grocery stores in my area don't carry half of the greens mentioned however I will be making up the difference in the garden (or foraged in the case of dandelion).

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used the bagged collards today that I posted about earlier. Started with coupoe handfuls of brown lentils, couple chipoltles en adpbo  and water. As they started to soften I added Andouille sausage, and then stated to layer in the collards, adding water, coconut milk and chicken powder/salt gently. The collards had been machine cut I think and ribs not taken off. I added a fat green onion - new product Ralphs/Kroger brought in. The lentils created a nice gravy and the bit of chew in the greens works for me Very tasty and comforting.

IMG_1857.jpg

IMG_1856.jpg

Edited by heidih (log)
  • Like 1
  • Delicious 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...