Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Chris Hennes

Cooking with Ottolenghi's "Plenty"

Recommended Posts

Pear Crostini from Plenty p 278.  Very nice with a glass of wine.

IMG_5364.thumb.jpg.2a86eb9c4363e0f6e63d2558a5429bd6.jpg

I was so tempted to make some of these with gorgonzola instead of goat cheese but with the ground pine nut/garlic/oil mixture that gets baked onto the toast, goat cheese is really the right choice. The pears get a dip in a lemon juice/sugar/olive oil mix to help the grill marks along.  I substituted tarragon for the specified chervil. My copy of Plenty says to slice the bread 1.5 inches thick. Wrong - it's supposed to be 1.5 cm. So annoying that no one caught these incorrect unit translations.

 

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stuffed Portobello with Melting Taleggio from Plenty p 56.  The ingredient list is online here

IMG_5680.thumb.jpg.b0490f588438ab30977db90655c343e4.jpg

I used some bigger cremini instead of portobellos and used a little less sun dried tomatoes than called for but otherwise followed the recipe. 

Stuffing contains onion, celery, sundried tomato, garlic, Parmesan, tarragon & basil.
I have had some tasty stuffed mushrooms in the past but I've never tasted a better melty cheese than Taleggio - so, so good!

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

Stuffed Portobello with Melting Taleggio from Plenty p 56.  The ingredient list is online here

 Any thoughts on what might work in place of the Taleggio?  Even when I asked my well stocked cheesemonger who carries almost everything known in the cheese world at one time or another could not come up with this cheese.  And chances of finding it on an island in the  wilds of Canada are pretty much zero.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, Anna N said:

 Any thoughts on what might work in place of the Taleggio?  Even when I asked my well stocked cheesemonger who carries almost everything known in the cheese world at one time or another could not come up with this cheese.  And chances of finding it on an island in the  wilds of Canada are pretty much zero.

Well, if you can find a slightly stinky, semi-soft, washed rind cheese that would be closest.

I might try some of that smoky blue cheese you had earlier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

Well, if you can find a slightly stinky, semi-soft, washed rind cheese that would be closest.

I might try some of that smoky blue cheese you had earlier.

 I was hoping for something other than blue cheese since I don't think Kerry is a great fan. No worries. They do look tasty.  Thank you. Oh and by the way I spit my coffee all over my iPad when you suggested that I look for "a slightly stinky, semi-soft washed rind cheese" on "Moanitoulin"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, Anna N said:

 I was hoping for something other than blue cheese since I don't think Kerry is a great fan. No worries. They do look tasty.  Thank you. Oh and by the way I spit my coffee all over my iPad when you suggested that I look for "a slightly stinky, semi-soft washed rind cheese" on "Moanitoulin"

Understood!  

I'll say that the Taleggio really added a ton of flavor to this recipe so I would choose the most strongly flavored cheese you can access, or a mix of a strong stinky and a soft melty. 

It's also quite salty so you'll probably want more salt in the stuffing if you go with a different cheese.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On July 1, 2017 at 11:53 AM, Anna N said:

 Any thoughts on what might work in place of the Taleggio?  Even when I asked my well stocked cheesemonger who carries almost everything known in the cheese world at one time or another could not come up with this cheese.  And chances of finding it on an island in the  wilds of Canada are pretty much zero.

Try Brie or camambert, the texture is similar.  It will not have that lovely stinky aroma though...

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, caroled said:

How about some Morbier?

 

On Manitoulin?  Not likely.  But thanks for the suggestion.   I may have to leave the mushrooms until we move south again.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Parsnip dumplings in broth, p. 28

 

DSC_6710.jpg

 

One of the few recipes in the book I still hadn't made, this is a straightforward vegetarian broth (with prunes added for body and color) and parsnip and potato dumplings. It works reasonably well as a first course, I think. Good, but not as fantastic as some of the other recipes in the book.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Caramelized Garlic Tart from Ottolenghi's Plenty p 38.  @Chris Hennes posted about making this upthread here

IMG_7063.thumb.jpg.ad7a1cc7dc79664a1417672a6ae006b6.jpg

 

IMG_7059.thumb.jpg.d060cc59e8d80006d155c63860f3bd04.jpg

 

I cheated and used a regular crust (and yes, full disclosure, it came from Pillsbury :$)  instead of puff pastry but the finished product is still very rich and delicious.   For the hard goat cheese, I used a mix of goat gouda and goat cheddar.  Silver Goat for the soft chèvre.   

  • Like 4
  • Delicious 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^ that's lovely. I love that you did it in a pie crust, as I don't have a tart pan (yeah I know, I have everything else, but what I need). Did you do anything different to compensate?

 

I've got some frozen pie crests that are begging to be used.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Smokeydoke said:

^^ that's lovely. I love that you did it in a pie crust, as I don't have a tart pan (yeah I know, I have everything else, but what I need). Did you do anything different to compensate?

I've got some frozen pie crests that are begging to be used.

 

The recipe called for an 11-inch tart pan.  I used a 10-inch glass pie pan so I need to roll out the pie crust a bit bigger than the packaged size.  I used an egg wash, applied after removing the pie weights, as I usually do with a custard pie.  Since my pan was a bit smaller, I cut back a little on the filling.  I used the full amount of garlic but just shy of 4 oz each of the hard and soft goat cheeses and ~ 5T each of the heavy cream and crème fraîche.  Since some of the egg went into the egg wash, I didn't adjust that. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Chris Hennes
      A few weeks ago I checked out a copy of Madhur Jaffrey's Vegetarian India from the library, and it is well on its way to earning a permanent place in my collection. I've really enjoyed the recipes I've cooked from it so far, and thought I'd share a few of them here. Of course, if anyone else has cooked anything from the book please share your favorites here, too.
       
      To kick things off, something that appears in nearly every meal I've cooked this month... a yogurt dish such as
       
      Simple Seasoned Yogurt, South Indian-Style (p. 324)
       

       
       
    • By CCB
      I used my homemade toffee in a cookie recipe hoping that the toffee will add a crunch to the cookie... it didn't turn out well as the toffee melted and didn't keep its hardened crunch form. How can I prevent my toffee from melting in my cookie recipe?
    • By KennethT
      Is there a discussion in the book about the purpose of adding ascorbic acid?  I just saw the contest #2 in which the recipe called for it.  I'm curious because a woman I know on the internet used to work in a bakery in Vietnam, and said that to get similar results to the banh mi there, you need to add ascorbic acid.  Does it act as a gluten relaxer?  Traditional banh mi have a very tender and crisp crust, and a very light and tender, relatively closed crumb.
    • By quiet1
      We have a local Italian bakery my mom loves, but they are very expensive and hard for her to get to. She also really likes cookbooks (she reads them even if she never cooks from them  ) so I was thinking for her birthday I could get her a cookbook that has similar cookies and cakes, and offer to make a few things for her on request also.
       
      I'll obviously look myself, but eGullet is always well informed about the quality of cookbooks so I wanted to know if anyone has any recommendations. The thing about the Italian bakery is that the stuff they make seems to me to be not as sweet as classic American recipes, and often have more complex flavors and also are usually on the light end for whatever the item is. (Like even something that's intended to be dense doesn't have a very heavy sensation in the mouth.)
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×