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Cooking with beeswax


ninagluck
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no Deryn, we put some paper on a baking tray, sprayed it with non stick speay, put the fish with skin side down onto it, sprayed the fish with non stick spray and then poured the beeswax, melted to 75° C over it. Let the wax cool until hard again, turn everything out, pour the paper away an take the portions out of the wax. serve.

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Because

 

Scroll down to savoury applications.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I think the orientation of the picture confused me, nina - at first glance it looks as though you are showing off a hanging 'wall' of fish squares. Is the picture sideways (i.e. is that slab of fish on a flat surface or hanging from the hand at the top)?

 

The article Anna linked to (thanks, Anna) says that the technique (which I think you are using to 'cook' this fish) is to heat the beeswax to 84 degrees for a barely warmed fish. You say you warmed only to 75 .. pretty sashimi-like? What form of beeswax did you use?

 

I hope you come back to fully explain what you did, etc. because just posting that picture and saying it worked when it is not a common household technique - at least not in my house - is a bit cruel. This enquiring mind wants to know more. Did you all eat the results of this experiment and like it? Was it served as shown? How did you 'remove' the wax before serving - did it peel off completely ... did it leave any residual beeswax 'fragrance' that somehow enhanced the flavour? How thick was each piece of char and how large are those squares (about 2 x 2 inches?) What else did you serve with them? Was the fish seasoned in any way?

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Deryn, here is another article on the subject and in the short film, you can see how it is done. it was not sashimi like, luke warm and extremly juicy and soft. with a palette knife we could easily take the fish out of the wax. it was served with vegetable bulgur, salad creme, salad and fennel pollen. I will try to find a pic from the complete dish. our group was 22 people and we all agreed, that it was excellent.

http://www.steirereck.at/en/stories/madrid_fusion.php

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Thank you, Nina. Very interesting. I grew up catching and eating greyling in the Yukon (which does have clear and clean, cold lakes and streams) and while it was delicious, it was ubiquitous up there (and I was young and naïve) so I guess I didn't 'appreciate' its 'thyme-ly' nuances till now. The first fish I ever caught as a kid was a greyling.

 

The final dish looks amazing. Wish I had been there to try it. I am sure char (which I also love) works just as well as greyling.

Edited by Deryn (log)
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