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Induction cookware set


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I've researched it a little, and I know that I need the proper cookware in order for it to work. I have read this article on induction cookware set  and it has really enlightened me. Now am I'm comparing two stainless steel cookware sets from the same manufacturer. One has 8 pieces and the other has ten plus an induction cooktop. The differences in the basis sets are that the 10 piece has a 3 quart pan with lid and the 10-piece also has a larger stockpot (8 quarts versus 6 quarts).
In addition, the 10 piece has a current offer for a free portable induction cooktop.
The 10 piece is $130 more than the 8 piece, so I'm leaning toward the 8 piece unless someone says the induction cooktop is a must-have item. I see it as likely to be put in a cabinet and not used much, but I'm definitely open to hearing good things about it.
Have you used a portable induction cooktop, and if so, which of these cookware sets is a better deal?

Thanks for your thoughts!

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Not to discourage you, but there are many, many better primers on induction hobs, how they work, and what compatible pans are on the market.  See, https://www.centurylife.org/how-to-choose-a-cooktop/how-to-choose-a-portable-induction-cooker-countertop-burner/

And for the cookware to use on it, see, https://www.centurylife.org/how-to-choose-cookware/

The latter has a dandy little filter tool, so you can narrow the choices.  This guy's work is top-notch.

 

The cheap PICs (portable induction cooktops) go for $50-$100, so factor that into your $130 price difference.

 

I don't know what I'd do with a 6Q stockpot.  8Q is pretty much the minimum size I use.

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That link didn't work for me./Link did work

 

Why would you be considering cookware, if you're planning to put the cooktop away in a cabinet?

 

What's more important than the cookware is the induction burner. Wattage, the number of power levels and whether the power is actually regulated as opposed to simply on/off for various lengths of time are important factors.

 

I covered up my gas cooktop and instead use two portable induction cooktops. One is 220 volt 3000 watts and the other is 115 volts and 1800 watts. I have used all manner of cookware and found no discernible difference.

 

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If you're in the US, I'd do a lot of comparing and then start frequenting Home Goods, Marshall's, TJ Maxx, Tuesday Morning, etc. That, and start looking for BB&B sales where they let you also use a 20% coupon on top of the sale price. You'll get a lot more for your money with a little planning. Also, that site is run by one small retailer trying to channel you into purchasing from them. There are better places to look for info and deals. There are threads on this site about choosing pans, take a look at them. You'll probably find that just a few pans (8-10" skillet, a 4-6 qt pot to boil pasta in, a wok, a dutch oven, a bamboo steamer, and a large stockpot) are all you need. Take a good hard look at what and how you cook and see if you'll use all those extra saucepans, etc.

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I would not buy any new cookware that was not induction compatible, but like most here I already have a good amount of cookware so any new is purchased by the piece - not as a "set".

 

deBuyer and other carbons are induction compatible and some of the best skillet available.  LeC, Staub and other enamaled cast iron are induction compatible and are some of the best roasters/braisers available.  All Clad and Viking among others are quality stainless that are induction compatible.  

 

Compatible stockpots are more difficult to find.  As noted above 8 qt is minimum I would use and 12 or 16qt are more likely.  One of the best things about induction is ability to heat large amounts of liquid - faster ans with more control than gas - so good stockpots are especially useful.

 

Suggest you shop for required pieces vice sets, buy at least one lg stockpot, a pasta pot and a good skillet.  If shopping off brands (and I like to save some coin when I can) carry a refrigerator magnet with you.  If magnet does not stick it's not induction compatible, no matter what packaging says.

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