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eG Cook-Off #72: Ramen


David Ross
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A bowl of "karē rāmen" (カレーラーメン).  :)

More properly, "Singapore Laksa La Mian" [Prima Taste].

 

The noodles and component packs.

I've shown this before but here it is again all the same.

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Daun laksa a.k.a. daun kesum (Vietnamese coriander; rau răm) from my deck; plus mung bean sprouts.

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Some wild American shrimp were cooked in the simmering laksa broth mixture; and a previously-cooked chicken leg was rewarmed in the broth also. Both reserved; the la mian block cooked as directed, the bean sprouts blanched in the broth, and everything assembled in a bowl and topped w/ deep-fried shallots.

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Very enjoyable.

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A ramen bowl.

DSCN0886a_600.jpg

Dragonfly "Instant Noodles Artificial Hot & Sour Shrimp Flavor" added into a broth.

The broth was made w/ shrimp shells fried w/ sliced ginger & peanut oil plus some Tom Yum paste [Por Kwan] then quenched w/ water and simmered for a while with more Tom Yum paste added in, then fishing out all solids; then just-barely cooking de-shelled de-veined wild American shrimps in it (and reserving the shrimps).

Trimmed/washed ong choy (water morning glory) was blanched in the broth then reserved. The noodles and sauce packets etc went in, then sliced-up aburaage. Assembled/bowled with 3 halved hard-boiled eggs, chopped scallions, chopped coriander leaves, and deep-fried shallots.

 

The noodle pack contents:

DSCN0880a_500.jpg

 

The initial broth simmering:

DSCN0877a_400.jpg

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Originally ramen noodles were made using the water from a lake that had a high soda content.

I make my own ramen noodles.

They are night and day better than the little packaged ones.

Here's recipe that results in excellent ramen noodles:

 

Into 100 ml warm water add 1 1/2 t ‘baked soda’. (Google how to make 'baked soda'. I make enough to last me six months. I keep it in an airtight container.)

Stir to dissolve.

Into food processor add 2 C All Purpose flour.

Set speed to low.

Slowly pour in the soda water.

In a minute the flour/water will form into small balls.

Remove from processor and knead into a large ball.

You don’t need to rest the dough like the Italian pasta.

Form the dough into golf balls. Press into discs and like with the Italian pasta make thin sheets then run them through the ‘spaghetti’ cutters.

I lightly dredge the noodles with All Purpose flour.

 As with the Italian pasta I put the noodles into lots of lightly salted boiling water. The noodles only take a minute to cook, if that.

Some people advise rinsing the ramen noodles in cold water then adding to the hot soup.

I don’t bother if I’m using them right away. If I’m putting some in the fridge for later I do give the noodles a cold water rinse and then drain.

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@pufin3

 

Thanks for sharing this. Curious as to your food processor which permits a choice of speeds. I have had a number of brands over the years and none had this option. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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2 hours ago, pufin3 said:

I make my own ramen noodles.

They are night and day better than the little packaged ones.

Have you had fresh Sun ramen, made in the USA? Or fresh ramen brought into the USA from Japan? Just curious.

 

2 hours ago, pufin3 said:

Originally ramen noodles were made using the water from a lake that had a high soda content.

Yes, a lake in Inner Mongolia, according to the usual history of its origins as la mian.  ;-)

Edited by huiray (log)
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3 hours ago, Anna N said:

@pufin3

 

Thanks for sharing this. Curious as to your food processor which permits a choice of speeds. I have had a number of brands over the years and none had this option. 

This is the one I've had for a few years:

100_7101.jpg

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2 hours ago, huiray said:

Have you had fresh Sun ramen, made in the USA? Or fresh ramen brought into the USA from Japan? Just curious.

 

Yes, a lake in Inner Mongolia, according to the usual history of its origins as la mian.  ;-)

 

No I haven't had any store bought fresh ramen noodles. Never seen them in the stores where I live nearby.

I'm sure they are tastier than the .25 cent packages available.

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36 minutes ago, pufin3 said:

No I haven't had any store bought fresh ramen noodles. Never seen them in the stores where I live nearby.

I'm sure they are tastier than the .25 cent packages available.

 

OK, thanks for the reply.

 

Yes, the "25 cent" packages would be bottom-of-the-line stuff, indeed. (Actually, even the cheapest - with a seasoning pack in it) would be somewhere between 60-ish and 90-ish cents.** :-) I would murmur, however, that there are various brands of "instant ramen" or "instant noodles" from Taiwan, SE Asia, Japan, Korea, and so on that are very good. Many of them are also not cheap - for example, the laksa la mian pack above (with one of the best la mian blocks I've had) would be around $4-$5 each if bought individually in some places. If you had the opportunity one day perhaps you might consider trying some of the better ones.

 

But nevertheless it is good to read of your recipe for your own ramen noodles, thanks. I'm sure they are excellent. One day perhaps I might try it. Can your method be done in a blender on "low" or on "pulse"; or by hand?

(ETA: Traditionally, la mian was done entirely by hand, and is still done so today. Pasta was, too, of course)

 

**ETA2: Oh, wait, I remember years ago one could get packs of these instant ramen stuff (the low end stuff) from Western supermarkets in the USA for something like 4 or 5 packs to a dollar when they had special deals. Or even more for less money - but that was many, many years ago.

 

Edited by huiray (log)
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Thanks, @pufin3.  I have never seen that brand. Most seem to have only one speed. 

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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On 8/31/2016 at 10:20 AM, huiray said:

 

OK, thanks for the reply.

 

Yes, the "25 cent" packages would be bottom-of-the-line stuff, indeed. (Actually, even the cheapest - with a seasoning pack in it) would be somewhere between 60-ish and 90-ish cents.** :-) I would murmur, however, that there are various brands of "instant ramen" or "instant noodles" from Taiwan, SE Asia, Japan, Korea, and so on that are very good. Many of them are also not cheap - for example, the laksa la mian pack above (with one of the best la mian blocks I've had) would be around $4-$5 each if bought individually in some places. If you had the opportunity one day perhaps you might consider trying some of the better ones.

 

But nevertheless it is good to read of your recipe for your own ramen noodles, thanks. I'm sure they are excellent. One day perhaps I might try it. Can your method be done in a blender on "low" or on "pulse"; or by hand?

(ETA: Traditionally, la mian was done entirely by hand, and is still done so today. Pasta was, too, of course)

 

**ETA2: Oh, wait, I remember years ago one could get packs of these instant ramen stuff (the low end stuff) from Western supermarkets in the USA for something like 4 or 5 packs to a dollar when they had special deals. Or even more for less money - but that was many, many years ago.

 

 

I'm guessing ramen noodles have been made "by hand" for quite a while LOL

I think you could quickly 'pulse' your blender to get the ingredients to essentially come together. After they do you'd probably want to finish kneading by hand.

I get a bunch little pieces about the size of small dried lentils. They don't look like they will form a ball by some hand kneading but they do.

Try the recipe sometime when you are in the mood. I'd like to read your feedback.

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A dry ramen plate.

 

Yakisoba last night.

DSCN1078a_600.jpg

Two farm-fresh eggs beaten w/ some salt, hon-mirin, sake, water, ground white pepper, oil. "Flash fried" in a very hot pan w/ generous oil for a bubbly lightly-browned omelette (less than a minute in all), removed & reserved, roughly "chopped" into strips.

A bit more oil in the pan, then lots of sliced lightly-crushed garlic (Music), some of the white parts (sliced thinly on the diagonal) of an entire large-ish negi, toss/stir quickly; chopped hakusai (wong nga pak; Napa cabbage), stir in on high heat; the yakisoba seasoning packets (2) from the nama yakisoba package [Maruchan] (fresh yakisoba), then still-wet fresh yakisoba (from the package) rinsed under hot water, stir in, splash some water in, stir/turn over; add back in the reserved egg strips and the rest of the sliced white-parts of the negi, final toss & stir. Plate, garnish w/ the green parts of the negi, a quick drizzle of Bulldog tonkatsu sauce.

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  • 10 months later...
  • 3 months later...

Made a :

 

Beef Tendon Ramen

The tendon was cured: Salt sugar/lemongrass/kaffir line/ hot peppers for a week---washed and sous vide 10hrs 145F in Sambal and rice wine vinegar

I used only the tendon attachment for this dish

24832526678_937b0bbda1_o.thumb.jpg.5fe0fc7625711b03d98efa31c38fdbed.jpg

 

 

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Its good to have Morels

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3 hours ago, Paul Bacino said:

Made a :

 

Beef Tendon Ramen

The tendon was cured: Salt sugar/lemongrass/kaffir line/ hot peppers for a week---washed and sous vide 10hrs 145F in Sambal and rice wine vinegar

I used only the tendon attachment for this dish

24832526678_937b0bbda1_o.thumb.jpg.5fe0fc7625711b03d98efa31c38fdbed.jpg

 

 

Wonderful Paul. What are the greens and can you tell me a little more about the broth?  I'm not cooking much right now due to a broken arm, but this is going to the top of the list when I can.  Soothing, hot and delicious.

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@David Ross      David--  this is a derivative from  (  https://bestbyfarr.wordpress.com/2009/03/29/spicy-beef-tendon/ )  -

 

 

-follow their lead and add what you wish...btw it reads backwards

 

 

The greens are Bok Choy  and my beef stock Wierd as it was is  just ( Kitchen Basic unsalted )  but by the time you add in the spicy tendon and heat that for awhile, you get awesome collagen injection to fortify the broth.  Lip smakin and easy peezy.

I could make a complicated broth,  but I find also---> what works good,  is I have an Asian Pho restaurant and their spicy beef broth is far easier to use in dishes than the time it would take me

 

cheers  Doc B

Edited by Paul Bacino (log)
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  • 3 months later...

I have to recommend this ramen packet:

 

Japanese Noodles Tonkotsu Ramen Concentration Pork...

 

 

It is not instant ramen but rather a packet of pork fat and bone broth to which one adds cooked ramen noodles and whatever.  Cost is about $2.00 per meal.  But I've not had better ramen.  Served with scallions, leftover sliced pork, and much shichimi togarashi.  Na ma tung ith nug.

 

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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The texture of fresh (or pre-packaged, non-dried) ramen is different, and to my mind better, than fried instant noodles. But they're a pain in the ass to make yourself and they're not widely available commercially. I was an advocate of fresh Sun Noodles for a short time, but was rather quickly turned off by the ridiculous amount of riboflaven they add to the noodles to create the yellow color. It's so much that it turns the cooking water yellow. And you can taste it. Noodles that taste like vitamins? Horrible. It's like everything bad about enriched flour or rice, but turned up to 11.

 

I went back to instant packets.

 

Sun Noodles makes the noodles for many of the top ramen shops, and I'm sure they have formulations available that aren't vitamin B-2 bombs. In fact, I'm sure I've eaten some of those noodles. If you could buy fresh, non-Ribo-roided-out Sun Noodles at the local grocery, I'd be very happy. The noodles would be perfect if they weren't dyed with freaking vitamins.

 

I'm keen to try these fresh-ish noodles from Hakubaru, which use annatto for color. I'd prefer that companies didn't dye their noodles at all, but if you're going to do it... annatto > riboflaven.

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9 hours ago, btbyrd said:

The texture of fresh (or pre-packaged, non-dried) ramen is different, and to my mind better, than fried instant noodles. But they're a pain in the ass to make yourself and they're not widely available commercially. I was an advocate of fresh Sun Noodles for a short time, but was rather quickly turned off by the ridiculous amount of riboflaven they add to the noodles to create the yellow color. It's so much that it turns the cooking water yellow. And you can taste it. Noodles that taste like vitamins? Horrible. It's like everything bad about enriched flour or rice, but turned up to 11.

 

I went back to instant packets.

 

Sun Noodles makes the noodles for many of the top ramen shops, and I'm sure they have formulations available that aren't vitamin B-2 bombs. In fact, I'm sure I've eaten some of those noodles. If you could buy fresh, non-Ribo-roided-out Sun Noodles at the local grocery, I'd be very happy. The noodles would be perfect if they weren't dyed with freaking vitamins.

 

I'm keen to try these fresh-ish noodles from Hakubaru, which use annatto for color. I'd prefer that companies didn't dye their noodles at all, but if you're going to do it... annatto > riboflaven.

 

What about dried ramen, non-instant, not fried?

 

I've been well pleased with these noodles...

Hakubaku Organic Ramen

 

They are what I had last night.

Edited by Smithy
Adjusted link to be eG-friendly (log)

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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I've tried them before and should give them another try, as it's been a while. I remember them being good, but somewhat thinner than I was used to. I'll give them another try sometime soon. I'm definitely going to try the broth you mentioned. Looks very good judging by the ingredient list and the enthusiastic reviews.

 

I've been meaning to try the "baking soda/spaghetti" alkali noodle trick to see how that works, but I fear my sensitivity to soapy alkali flavors may pose problems.

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I've wanted to make ramen for a while now. Vegetarian ramen that is.

 

IMG_20180223_173751.thumb.jpg.52f146155c02ce7b0f1806badbda7d5a.jpgIMG_20180224_150152_1.thumb.jpg.918e54d7039bd0832a444a01a93bf37e.jpgIMG_20180224_150158.thumb.jpg.67a07e773bb13b28820c246ec84215fc.jpg

 

Homemade alkaline noodles (using baked baking powder) and extra wheat gluten.

Stock made of charred veggies (onion, cabbage, ginger, leek, chili, garlic), kombu, mushrooms, cooked in a PC.

Black garlic oil, sesame paste, red miso. Fresh garlic, soy sauce, sesame oil.

Topped with baked eggplant, sweet potato, mushrooms and kohlrabi. A soft egg.

 

 

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~ Shai N.

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