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Non-serrated offset slicing knife


robie
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I have this slicer http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/zwilling-ja-henckels-pro-slicing-knife/ which I love for the blade.  I hate this knife because I bang my knuckles against the cutting board; I have to use the knife at the edge of the counter.

When I bought it, I was looking for an offset format like this http://www.webstaurantstore.com/dexter-russell-29323-v-lo-9-scalloped-offset-bread-and-sandwich-knife/21029323.html  However, everything had a serrated blade which I do not want because I use this knife mostly for things like fruits and vegetables (I have a bread knife).

 

Does anyone know of a good/great quality non-serrated slicing (thin, fairly long blade) knife with an offset handle?

 

Thanks!

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you might want to consider a chef or santuko knife style.  the wider blade keeps the fingers off the board.

 

the advantage is - many lengths/style/price points available.....

 

my dear wife has the same issue - trying to slice radishes (for example) with a paring knife on a 2" thick maple board.

it's painful to watch and more painful to suggest a solution.....

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1 hour ago, palo said:

Chinese cleaver?

 

p

 

Since the original poster's application is fruits and vegetables, how about a Nakiri?  Not that I have a Nakiri myself, as much as I would like one.

 

I use a western style chef's knife for such things.

 

(And I thought I was the only one with a fetish for Wusthof cheese knives??)

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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That is cool dcarch.  Many thanks for all of the responses.  I've thought about a santoku or nakiri but I really like the thin, long blade shape of the Henckel.  I guess I need to go into a WS or SLT and see how the Japanese blade shapes would work for me.

Edited by robie
Misspelled dcarch (log)
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Hi, robie:

 

Here are two blades I made and a vintage Zwilling glestain slicer.  The "sandwich knife" is SS and chisel-ground.  The "Euro Chef" is flat-ground.  Both are quite thin for vegetable work on a board, at least as thin as the slicer.

 

If you want a rocker to the edge and work on a board, I would just go looking for the thinnest chef knife you can find with a decent drop.  The Japanese knife nerds sometimes call these "lasers".  If you don't mind a completely straight edge--and don't need a tip, those cheese/kamagata knife geometries work well.

 

Slicers and pettys can be frustrating for cutting anything that is not perched high on something, be it a board or in a pan or rack.  If you're cutting against something, you end up dragging the tip through the last of it, which can dull it there quickly, which means you will tend to tear, not cut.  This wear happens nauturally over time, which I think is the explanation for the very slight rounding at the very tip of nakiris--now they just put that line on at the factory.  

20160227_100228.jpg

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