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Bentley

Molded chocolates workflow

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So you want to make a molded chocolate with a 2 layer filling of a caramel and a ganache.  What is your workflow?  What do you start first and how do you time everything out so that the components are all ready to come together at the right temperatures given that the caramel and ganache need to be pipe-able.?

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I don't think that you need both layers to be pipe-able at the same time.  I'd be inclined to pipe one, let it crust a bit, then pipe the other.

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I'm with pastrygirl - they don't need to be used at the same time.

 

You can make the caramel at your leisure because it will remain pipeable at room temperature. I tend to put ganache in first then caramel in behind because if you pipe ganache on top of caramel it tends to cause it to squish out.

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I thought the caramel would set at room temperature (isn't that how they cut it to enrobe caramels?)  Would Greweling's recipe for soft caramel using fresh dairy be a good starting point for a caramel for molded chocolates?

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The kind of caramel you cut isn't the kind you put in molded chocolates.  

 

I'll check out the recipe you are referring to when I get home.

 

 


Edited by Kerry Beal (log)
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Thanks Kerry.  The kind of caramel I'm thinking about is one that doesn't ooze out of the candy when cut or bitten into.  I'd like something that is soft and chewy but firm enough to retain its shape.

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4 minutes ago, Bentley said:

Thanks Kerry.  The kind of caramel I'm thinking about is one that doesn't ooze out of the candy when cut or bitten into.  I'd like something that is soft and chewy but firm enough to retain its shape.

@Bentley if that is what you would like to make, are you ok with making a slab of ganache & caramel, cutting it, and dipping the pieces in chocolate? Or are you looking to make this in a molded chocolate? It may be possible to make this as a molded chocolate but I am not sure how you would do it... when you make a firm caramel, you do not have a pipeable caramel.

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16 minutes ago, Bentley said:

Thanks Kerry.  The kind of caramel I'm thinking about is one that doesn't ooze out of the candy when cut or bitten into.  I'd like something that is soft and chewy but firm enough to retain its shape.

Had a chance to look a the recipe - the Greweling soft caramel will ooze when cut or bitten into. If you want something that doesn't do that you could make the caramel from the page before, pinch off pieces of it and press it into the mold. If you try to pipe it - it will be too hot for the chocolate. I'd probably cook it a degree or two cooler than recommended to make it softer to bite into.

 

 

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Indeed - we are all still learning (I don't believe anyone who thinks they know it all) - and chocolate can be a cruel mistress.

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Here is a picture of what I was thinking of.....a ganache layer with a caramel layer where the caramel isn't firm but doesn't ooze.  And I notice they piped the caramel in first.

Screen Shot 2016-02-13 at 3.56.37 PM.png

 

The photo is a screenshot of the Banana Fosters bonbon from http://www.ghyslain.com/


Edited by Bentley Attribution of photo (log)

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That actually looks like there is some flow to it. I think some experimentation is in your future to come up with the perfect texture.


Edited by Kerry Beal (log)

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3 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

I think some experimentation is in your future to come up with the perfect texture.

 

Indeed.  That's the fun part.

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How hot you cook your caramel will impact how firm it sets up. A decent cream based caramel recipe, heated to around 106 - 110 degrees C will give you a soft caramel that will crust up enough that it won't ooze if you leave it for a few hours before sealing the mold. Always recommend caramel is your second layer but our 108C caramels are often used as the first layer without oozing.

(sorry my American friends, no idea how to convert to your weird Fahrenheit temperature)

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59 minutes ago, Stu Jordan said:

 

(sorry my American friends, no idea how to convert to your weird Fahrenheit temperature)

 

F = (C x 1.8) + 32

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On 2/12/2016 at 9:51 AM, Bentley said:

Thanks Kerry.  The kind of caramel I'm thinking about is one that doesn't ooze out of the candy when cut or bitten into.  I'd like something that is soft and chewy but firm enough to retain its shape.

 

Sorry to be coming late to this party and much has been said already!  I make to types of caramel.  One is a slab that I cut and hand dip.  This is cooked to what is referred to as "firm ball" (approximately 238F). I use Greweling's formula using sweetened condensed milk though there are 2 others that work just as well.  It's a matter of preference.

 

The second caramel I make is a soft, pipable caramel.  These are a "traditional" dry caramel that I cook to color before adding warm cream.  I often infuse the cream with a flavor (e.g. rosemary) or add salt at the end.  Butter is added once the sugar and caramel are combined and taken off the fire.  I also add a bit of milk chocolate to the mixture (a tip given by a friend) that I believe adds a nice texture and flavor note, but this is optional.

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On 3/17/2016 at 4:29 PM, lebowits said:

 I also add a bit of milk chocolate to the mixture (a tip given by a friend) that I believe adds a nice texture and flavor note, but this is optional.

I'm intrigued by this - what does the addition of chocolate do to the texture? Do you have to let the caramel cool a bit before adding? How much do you add?

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After I cook the sugar to caramel and quench it with the cream, I bring it back to a boil just to make sure that there aren't any lumps.  I then take it off the fire and add butter and then pour the entire mass into a bowl with the bit of milk chocolate.  Alternately, the butter can be added later after the mass has cooled to 90F and you'll get a firmer texture.   and then pour the entire mass into a bowl with the bit of milk chocolate.  I don't know that the little bit of chocolate included makes much of a difference to the texture, but it does seem to add a vague hint to the flavor.

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Hi folks: my question is unrelated to the previous poster, however it does fall into the category of 'Molded Chocolates Workflow' so I figured I'd pose it here. I've been tempering/molding chocolates for ages, but for some reason, the past several months have been giving me a fairly consistent issue. I fill the cavities with tempered chocolate, tap to let the excess chocolate drips out, scrape and then lay the mold upside down, for about 5 minutes or so or when the chocolate starts to set. When I scrape again to get the excess chocolate off the top after the mold has been upside down, the side of the cavity caves in. I've tried waiting until the molds are fully set and scraping then, but i either get the whole shell coming out, or also a side cave-in. Has this happened to any of you?

 

Thanks!

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@SweetandSnappyJen A lot depends on your room temp, but for me, with my room being right about 20º (yes friends, I've allowed my room to be a bit warmer), I pour, rap 5 seconds, dump, scrape twice, and rest the molds on their side. This is the technique that Melissa Coppel taught. The resting on its side is to create a very slight lip which will help you guide when you pipe in the ganache. If the room is warmer then the timeline of this will have to go longer. And of course this assumes chocolate in temper and at proper working temperature.

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On the side-- interesting!  Doesn't the shell set imbalanced, and possibly too thin on the other side? Yea, my chocolate is always in temper and sets nicely, but I end up ruining 4-5 pieces per tray when they cave in. 

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I sit my molds up on one of their short ends ala Pierre Wybauw - I flip them so the side that was last scrapped is towards the top if that makes sense - any flow just rebalances then from the scraping.

 

 

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3 hours ago, gfron1 said:

@SweetandSnappyJen A lot depends on your room temp, but for me, with my room being right about 20º (yes friends, I've allowed my room to be a bit warmer), I pour, rap 5 seconds, dump, scrape twice, and rest the molds on their side. This is the technique that Melissa Coppel taught. The resting on its side is to create a very slight lip which will help you guide when you pipe in the ganache. If the room is warmer then the timeline of this will have to go longer. And of course this assumes chocolate in temper and at proper working temperature.

 

I am not sure if I follow you exactly with the lip acting as a guide.  Do you mean it lets you know just how much you can fill the cavity before it hits against the final cap?  I assume that is what you mean, but I want to make sure.  If so, then I will have to try this method.

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