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Salad 2016 –

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Brought one day old salad that was part of catered meal in the office and rescued the parts that were still OK.  Please don't look if you hate peppers ;)

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On 11/18/2016 at 0:53 PM, Anna N said:

Like bacon and butter, blue cheese makes everything better!  Must be that bountiful B. 

 

I was perusing the cheese counter at Kroger today and lo and behold, there was Humboldt Fog marked down! So I grabbed it, dashed back over to produce and got Bosc pears. Tomorrow night's dinner will be but an appetizer to an entree of pears with honey and Humboldt.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Winter tabbouleh made with grape tomatoes and parsley.  

 

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On ‎1‎/‎25‎/‎2017 at 10:04 PM, kayb said:

 

I was perusing the cheese counter at Kroger today and lo and behold, there was Humboldt Fog marked down! So I grabbed it, dashed back over to produce and got Bosc pears. Tomorrow night's dinner will be but an appetizer to an entree of pears with honey and Humboldt.

too bad figs aren't in season!!!!

Or roast the pears and then put them in a salad with the blue cheese.....

or poach the pears in red wine and ......

do you think I love blue cheese and pears?


Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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3 hours ago, suzilightning said:

too bad figs aren't in season!!!!

Or roast the pears and then put them in a salad with the blue cheese.....

or poach the pears in red wine and ......

do you think I love blue cheese and pears?

I've been eating them just sliced...with blue cheese. Haven't bothered to roast OR poach!


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Wedge salad with mayo, sour cream, blue cheese and bacon.  Iceberg lettuce is really an excuse to consume fatty salty goodness.  

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Iceberg lettuce, hearts of palm, feta, hazelnuts with simple vinegrette.

 

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Shaved Brussel sprouts with parsley, dill, olive oil, lime juice and topped with Parmesan cheese.

 

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18 hours ago, chefmd said:

Shaved Brussel sprouts with parsley, dill, olive oil, lime juice and topped with Parmesan cheese.

 

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 chefmd, how did you shave the sprouts?  The one time I tried a mandoline it took forever.  I don't have a food processory in my current location, and I'm hoping for a "magic bullet" solution - that is, something less labor intensive than hand-slicing with a knife.  ;)


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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58 minutes ago, Smithy said:

 chefmd, how did you shave the sprouts?  The one time I tried a mandoline it took forever.  I don't have a food processory in my current location, and I'm hoping for a "magic bullet" solution - that is, something less labor intensive than hand-slicing with a knife.  ;)

I used this serrated Mandoline, chose larger brussel sprouts (used smaller one to make side dish the other day), held them by stem end and sacrificed a small portion of the sprout while saving my fingers :).  It is my preferred Mandoline, it works well on very thin cuts due to the serrations, and I am sure can be found cheaper than 50 dollars on WS website.  I am pretty sure that I paid around 30.  Parmesan was shaved with vegetable peeler.

 

http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/186346/?catalogId=5&sku=186346&cm_ven=Google_PLA&cm_cat=Shopping&cm_pla=default&cm_ite=default&kwid=productads-adid^52929359623-device^c-plaid^83090053543-sku^186346-adType^PLA&gclid=CjwKEAiA3NTFBRDKheuO6IG43VQSJAA74F778Hazj-XaOU1KYbxsoK3a9SRw4IYrXJtjygfNIE-7GBoCaoTw_wcB

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I am on a salad kick!  Beets, avocado, mango with olive oil and lyme juice.

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Posted (edited)

15 hours ago, Smithy said:

 chefmd, how did you shave the sprouts?  The one time I tried a mandoline it took forever.  I don't have a food processory in my current location, and I'm hoping for a "magic bullet" solution - that is, something less labor intensive than hand-slicing with a knife.  ;)

 

 A Benriner mandolins works well but I often just resort to using a nice sharp knife.  Cut off the root end, cut in half and shred.  But I like using my knives 


Edited by scubadoo97 Spelling (log)
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"lyme juice", harvested from deer ticks?

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On ‎3‎/‎1‎/‎2017 at 0:39 AM, weedy said:

"lyme juice", harvested from deer ticks?

Only if you are from Connecticut


Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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Roasted beets tossed with olive oil, salt, scallions.  Served on a shmear of feta cheese, cream, sour cream mixture.

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Pickled zucchini ribbons, pickled onions and pickled asparagus with avocado and feta cheese crumbles on romaine lettuce.

HC

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Pink grapefruit & sumac salad from Ottolenghi's Plenty More, recipe available online here

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I substituted arugula for the watercress and added some uncalled for avocado slices at the end. There's a good dose of bitter flavors here - endive, grapefruit and the reduced grapefruit juice in the dressing but it's also bright and fresh. 

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The avocado looks like a great addition to that grapefruit salad. 

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Beet, avocado and pea salad from Ottolenghi's Plenty More, recipe available online here.  

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I almost always use some sort of citrus in a beet salad so this was a nice change of pace. I roasted the beets whole instead of boiling as the recipe specifies.  The cooked beets & thinly sliced onions are marinated in a mix of sherry vinegar, olive oil & chili sauce (I used Sambal Oelek) so they have a bit of heat. Once you start mixing the salad, everything (including the peas and avocado) turns beet-colored :o so it's worth composing it nicely on the plate. The online version calls for broad beans or edamame while the book uses peas.  

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Gorgeous salads, all.

 

Being lettuce season, we have been enjoying 6-8 varieties of young lettuce which totally destroys anything that one might get at the supermarket (makes it very hard to eat lettuce in winter!)

 

Lately I have also been adding Purple and Green Shiso leaves to my salads, which gives it a really nice and unique flavour and some added health benefits.

 

Last night, I made a grilled chicken salad with a home made Cesar dressing (then again all dressing at Casa Tac are home made).  It was nice, but took over the tender sweet lettuce.

 

I find to enjoy the lettuce, simply some excellent EVOO and a touch of salt and lemon are more than enough.  But that gets boring after a while!

 

 

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My total favorite salad is the old Seven Layer Salad from when?  The seventies?  I don't remember.

But I just love everything about it.  It's so big, tho, that I don't have occasion often enough to make it.

i think I  just might have to make a commitment and make it just for me and commit to having it every day for lunch for several days.

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1 hour ago, lindag said:

My total favorite salad is the old Seven Layer Salad from when?  The seventies?  I don't remember.

But I just love everything about it.  It's so big, tho, that I don't have occasion often enough to make it.

i think I  just might have to make a commitment and make it just for me and commit to having it every day for lunch for several days.

 

I made it just for me the other day reducing all the ingredients and assembling it in a 5 cup plastic lidded container, planning to eat half the first day and save the second half for the next day. I put a layer of torn iceberg on the bottom, added a layer of about 3 chopped small Campari tomatoes, sprinkled a layer of sliced green onion from the deck supplemented by some fine diced white onion, then a layer of thawed frozen petite peas, a layer of two chopped hard boiled eggs, and I added a layer of about 2-1/2 oz. grated cheddar. I'd store the cheddar separately next time, though and add it when I was ready to mix up the planned overs. It absorbed too much moisture from the veggies. I did store the crisp fried bacon separately, and that was good, because it provides a texture contrast when crumbled in at the last minute before mixing up the salad with the mayo dressing. I used about a TBSP of dressing for each of the two servings of salad and that was plenty for me. Oh, also I only add salt and pepper at the last minute before mixing as well to keep the salt from drawing moisture out of the veggies by osmosis. 

 

I love this salad too and will be making it more often now that I've figured out how to make a reasonable amount for just me.


Edited by Thanks for the Crepes punctuation (log)
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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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Saffron Chicken & Herb Salad from Ottolenghi's Jerusalem.  Recipe available online here.  

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Not the most photogenic salad I've made but very tasty.   I don't love raw fennel so I used the recommended sub of arugula and green onion. Fennel would have been better as I was sorely missing the crunch that it would bring.  After a few bites, I went back and  added  sliced radishes.  Sugar snap peas would also have been good.  No fresh red chiles about so I used a mixture of jalapeño for heat and red bell pepper for color. I cooked the chicken breast sous vide,  ahead of time, so aside from the time to simmer the orange/saffron mixture, this came together very quickly.  

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10 hours ago, Thanks for the Crepes said:

 

I made it just for me the other day reducing all the ingredients and assembling it in a 5 cup plastic lidded container, planning to eat half the first day and save the second half for the next day. I put a layer of torn iceberg on the bottom, added a layer of about 3 chopped small Campari tomatoes, sprinkled a layer of sliced green onion from the deck supplemented by some fine diced white onion, then a layer of thawed frozen petite peas, a layer of two chopped hard boiled eggs, and I added a layer of about 2-1/2 oz. grated cheddar. I'd store the cheddar separately next time, though and add it when I was ready to mix up the planned overs. It absorbed too much moisture from the veggies. I did store the crisp fried bacon separately, and that was good, because it provides a texture contrast when crumbled in at the last minute before mixing up the salad with the mayo dressing. I used about a TBSP of dressing for each of the two servings of salad and that was plenty for me. Oh, also I only add salt and pepper at the last minute before mixing as well to keep the salt from drawing moisture out of the veggies by osmosis. 

 

I love this salad too and will be making it more often now that I've figured out how to make a reasonable amount for just me.

 

Love it!  I'll try your method this time.

However, I'll forever see it in my mind in a beautiful trifle bowl.

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