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So I bought a duck


bonkboo
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@gfweb, this was reminiscent of the flavour of Pork Skins Chips and I don't much like their taste. Wonder if there's any way to fix that?

 

BTW, I really like nice crisp duck skin when it's on the duck. Not so much on the next day's leftovers. (Makes me eat up all the visible duck skin the night of the duck feast!)

 

Doesn't help what to do with the duck skin when it's been removed from the bird though.

Edited by TdeV (log)
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I find the duck skin best if you've cooked it low and slow for a long time to soften the collagen.  Also make sure that it's salted...  So you can either simmer in salted water (but then it likes to curl up and shrink)... another way is to season, then seal and cook SV at like 135 for 24 hours.  This will cook the collagen but it won't shrink like a shrinky-dink.  Chill, then scrap the fat with the back of a knife.  At this point, I put in a 375 oven between 2 silpats and 2 cookie sheets to keep flat... I usually do it until brown - I think about 20 minutes but I'm not sure about the timing... wasn't too long...  When finished, the skin is a little puffy and crisp - and melts in your mouth.  But it is important to season first, because it doesn't taste so good without the salt.

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5 hours ago, gfweb said:

I'm not a fan of pork rind either.  Maybe deep fry the skin and immediately salt it as it drains?

Pork rinds are one of my favorite snacks, when I get them at one of the local barbecue establishments that prepares them onsite. One of my favorites deep-fries them so they're crisp and puffy, then sprinkles a dry barbecue seasoning rub on them. Absolutely delicious.

 

Brim's is a southern regional brand of potato and other snack chips, including pork rinds. One of my children, when she was small, would demand "orange chips," which we finally determined were Brim's pork rinds, which came in a bag with an orange design on it. (This is not unlike my friend's four-year-old son, who demands "blue pizza," or some local store's take-and-bake deli pizza that comes in a blue box.)

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Don't ask. Eat it.

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5 hours ago, kayb said:

Pork rinds are one of my favorite snacks, when I get them at one of the local barbecue establishments that prepares them onsite. One of my favorites deep-fries them so they're crisp and puffy, then sprinkles a dry barbecue seasoning rub on them. Absolutely delicious.

 

Brim's is a southern regional brand of potato and other snack chips, including pork rinds. One of my children, when she was small, would demand "orange chips," which we finally determined were Brim's pork rinds, which came in a bag with an orange design on it. (This is not unlike my friend's four-year-old son, who demands "blue pizza," or some local store's take-and-bake deli pizza that comes in a blue box.)

 

Or my granddaughter who when she was small demanded "yellow", by which she meant Frascati DOC.

 

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  • 11 months later...

So the household has decided on duck for Xmas dinner, specifically roast duck l’orange. I have duck. I have oranges and other basic ingredients. I thought I’d better post here to see if anyone has any special tips or a particular favorite duck l’orange recipe. (Currently the plan is just to go with Julia, although I seem to have copies of two different recipes - one that calls for Madeira and one without.)

 

Definitely will just want to roast the whole duck, people want the presentation, and also no one is that keen on very pink duck anyway, so less risk of overcooking by that standard.

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I did a duck a couple weeks ago and for the orange sauce went with Raymond Sokolov's sauce bigarade from The Saucier's Apprentice (p44).  It is based on a brown sauce which he claims is the classic method.  I enjoyed some of the leftover sauce bigarade two nights ago with half a chicken.

 

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I used to do duck in a cherry sauce and the sauce was based on a brown sauce. I was trying to recreate the sauce for duck they used to do at La Cote Basque (now closed). It came out very close. I think that would work well for an orange sauce as well.

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Like a lot of recipes I've developed from scratch, my roast duck is pretty unconvential in terms of method.  I slow-roast it at 275 for about 5 hours, then at the very end turn the heat up to crisp the skin.  Turns out golden and crispy and moist.  A lot of people might be turned off by the breast meat being well-done, but the slow-roasting happens to keep the breast moist and juicy, at least that's my experience.  I usually stuff the cavity with lemons and garlic for added flavor.  I make this in late summer every year during our huckleberry season and serve the duck with a huckleberry compote.  Right now I have some huckleberry-cranberry compote I made for Thanksgiving turkey so now I'm thinking another roast duck with this compote. 

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2 hours ago, David Ross said:

Like a lot of recipes I've developed from scratch, my roast duck is pretty unconvential in terms of method.  I slow-roast it at 275 for about 5 hours, then at the very end turn the heat up to crisp the skin.  Turns out golden and crispy and moist.  A lot of people might be turned off by the breast meat being well-done, but the slow-roasting happens to keep the breast moist and juicy, at least that's my experience.  I usually stuff the cavity with lemons and garlic for added flavor.  I make this in late summer every year during our huckleberry season and serve the duck with a huckleberry compote.  Right now I have some huckleberry-cranberry compote I made for Thanksgiving turkey so now I'm thinking another roast duck with this compote. 

 

Slow roasting sounds right up our alley except for the horrible time I’ll have to be awake to put it in the oven so it’s ready for lunch. 

 

So for the duck l’orange version I’d put orange in the cavities (I’ve got two ducks - 5 people and one large dog who expects a taste of tasty cooking) and then make some kind of orange sauce, I’m thinking?

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Yes that sounds good.  You reminded me of a duck ala' orange recipe I've got stowed away somewhere in a recipe box.  It's out of a food magazine I just can't remember which one.  It's more of a tart orange sauce that relies on the sweet element from the oranges rather than a lot of added sugar, then uses Asian five-spice powder.  In any case I'm sure your duck will be delicious.

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I wrote about my "Christmas" duck last year that turned out to be my  December 29 duck because it took a long time to thaw.  Can't find the thread.

My friend the "egg man" who raises fancy chickens, game birds as well as guinea fowl, ducks, geese and etc., brought me a lovely big duck that had been flash frozen.

 

That sucker was determined to stay frozen but once I did get it thawed, it was a beauty.  And the long, low roasting method produces a lot more lovely duck fat.

I started it breast down and using my handy poultry hook, turned it over half-way through the roasting time.  I had stuffed a large orange, studded with 4 or 5 cloves and a large onion, also with a few cloves, in the cavity.

This was just after turning it when I applied the orange/apricot sauce I had made from homemade apricot preserves.

5a3efa19d6d1f_23throughjustturnedover.png.6bc404162d902587bd7febefa120b8c7.png

Then, after another 2 1/2 hours at 275°  - - And finally 25 minutes  at 375°F.  To finish that glaze.  

5a3efabfab057_duckendofroast2.jpg.eb58e3c8adb012c2f25d0a23bbeb33b3.jpg

 

5a3efa7271dd9_duckonplate.thumb.png.5de4c876b0d5197acd4acfdb891cb077.png

 

5a3efa4b7a78f_Duckfinal.png.e047d170830cd186b87c524397266b94.png

 

and the duck fat

5a3efa2b9996a_Duckfat.jpg.9a5bb95076c7bd724d1bc111f11f0613.jpg

 

and I used this to turn it.  Very handy instrument.

5a3efa78a4518_poultryhook.jpg.926a0be9fc3d5b730065c582809e2dd7.jpg

 

Edited by andiesenji (log)
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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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8 hours ago, David Ross said:

Like a lot of recipes I've developed from scratch, my roast duck is pretty unconvential in terms of method.  I slow-roast it at 275 for about 5 hours, then at the very end turn the heat up to crisp the skin.  Turns out golden and crispy and moist.  A lot of people might be turned off by the breast meat being well-done, but the slow-roasting happens to keep the breast moist and juicy, at least that's my experience.  I usually stuff the cavity with lemons and garlic for added flavor.  I make this in late summer every year during our huckleberry season and serve the duck with a huckleberry compote.  Right now I have some huckleberry-cranberry compote I made for Thanksgiving turkey so now I'm thinking another roast duck with this compote. 

 

A thought comes to mind...what if you cooked the duck sous vide for those five hours, then crisped the skin?

 

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22 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

A thought comes to mind...what if you cooked the duck sous vide for those five hours, then crisped the skin?

 

I do duck breast this way. I think more like 3 hrs...have to check ...at about 133F.; and then score the skin and crisp it up in the Darto.

 

Foolproof.

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11 hours ago, gfweb said:

I do duck breast this way. I think more like 3 hrs...have to check ...at about 133F.; and then score the skin and crisp it up in the Darto.

 

Foolproof.

Curious to know the size of the duck breasts you were doing this way.

Edited by Anna N (log)

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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22 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Curious to know the size of the duck breasts you were doing this way.

 

About the size of my hand..6 or 7 inches. 

 

I just checked the sv conditions.  136 F for 2.5 to 3 hours

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8 minutes ago, gfweb said:

About the size of my hand..6 or 7 inches. 

 

I just checked the sv conditions.  136 F for 2.5 to 3 hours

Hmmm.  A curious way to describe the size. I run into two distinct sizes and treat them quite differently. There is the small Pekin breast (rarely more than 8 ounces) and the much larger Moulard (often up to a pound or slightly more). Lengthwise I don’t think they differ too much. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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25 minutes ago, Ann_T said:

We are having duck for Christmas dinner again this year.

 

 

 

My favourite method for roast duck is Ina Garten's.   I've been using her recipe since 2006.

The recipe is on my blog.

 

I've never cooked a duck and your photo is tempting me; does it matter which type you use?  

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