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Costco Around the World


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Rail Pail,

The article I cited was definitely more recent than May (likely in 2003) and only talked about First Growths and this soon to be wine master.  I don't recall having seen the article you mentioned.

Was it in the most recent issue of Saveur? I was skimming my copy and saw and article on Costco and first growths.

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I have been to 2 Costco's in Japan and one in Cleveland. One in Japan (Chiba) is a two sory while the other one and the one in Cleveland are only one story, but there doesn't seem to be a huge difference in floor space.

I was quite surprised that all of the books in the Japnese Costco were in English, not too good for the Japanese people but great for me.

I love their wine selection, some great deals there.

Their non food items seems to be converted into yen directly at the current rates, making them seem very cheap. But the food items are priced higher, making them cheaper then buying at an Intenational market here, but quite a bit more than what I would apy in the US.

The meat prices are similar to Japanese stores except they are sold in MUCH bigger chunks.

They have great deals on fish and sushi.

The snack bars offer only pizza and hotdogs.

I like the apple pie, but the muffins were the most disgusting things I had ever eaten, even my kids wouldn't touch them!

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Rail Pail,

The article I cited was definitely more recent than May (likely in 2003) and only talked about First Growths and this soon to be wine master.  I don't recall having seen the article you mentioned.

Was it in the most recent issue of Saveur? I was skimming my copy and saw and article on Costco and first growths.

It might have been in Saveur. Are you referring to the their top 100 issue? I do have it at home.

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I have been to 3 CostCo locations in the chicago area. I have found Cuisnart copper pots, Caphalon Commerical pots for excellent deals. My friends and I are pratically evangelical when it comes to Cost-Co. Great deals on champers and wine. Also can buy hard liquor in the chicago stores.

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The Costco's here in the Greater Toronto Area all used to be Price Clubs, they all carry the Kirkland signature brands (Meat only became available a couple of years ago, their boneless pork chops are amazing). Sometimes there are really good deals and brands available. Of course, none of the Ontario Costco's carry wine. Stupid Ontario liqour laws. :angry:

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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When we were in COSTCO outside of London, the snack bar sold jacketed potatoes (baked potatoes) with choice of toppings including broccoli, butter or coleslaw (common in UK), along with the infamous COSTCO hot dog and soda deal.

And in the branch up near Leeds we bought a chocolate UK version of Monopoly (it was right around Christmas time).

They also sold this stuff they called Chinese Seaweed - which I have only had before in London's Soho Chinatown. It's actually the very green cabage which is thinly cut (chiffonade) and deep fried quickly then sprinkled with salt and sugar. It's very tasty. This was in a clear deli like container and was called Mrs. "something or another" - hey it's been a few years so I forgot!

Stop Tofu Abuse...Eat Foie Gras...

www.cuisinetc-catering.blogspot.com

www.cuisinetc.net

www.caterbuzz.com

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Of course, none of the Ontario Costco's carry wine.  Stupid Ontario liqour laws. :angry:

We have not-quite-as-stupid but still-pretty-stupid laws in New York that keep us from realizing the benefits of Costco's wine and spirits deals. There are wine shops attached to some New York Costcos but they seem to be independently owned and operated (as I understand it, and somebody correct me if I'm wrong, a liquor license in New York State only allows you to operate one retail store in the entire state, which is why we have no wine-and-spirits chains here) and don't seem to be part of the real Costco network of wine deals.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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The Costco outlets here in the Montreal-area, are located in the outskirts of the city, or in the suburbs. For the Canadian market, Costco has a freebie magazine, that showcases the products they carry, & new products on offer. The publication is available at all Costco locations across Canada.

------------

Steve

Edited by SteveW (log)
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When we drove across Canada we would stop into almsot every Costco that we passed (you'd be surprised how many we found). We did pick up the Canadian "Costco Connection" publication and that's how we knew when to be on the lookout. It was remarkable to see the local products. In the western part of Canada we found giant jars of saskatoon berry jam, which in local stores (same brand) were similarly priced (or more) and 1/4 the size. Throughout the Canadian Costcos there were Canadian products (like the no tears waterproof sunscreen for athletes) that aren't available at Costcos outside of the country.

Ellen Shapiro

www.byellen.com

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My friend and I will be at the Tamasakai (Tokyo), Japan Costco in just a couple hours!

We are going to look at cookbooks and buy whole chickens.

I will definitely stop and get their 90 yen all you can drink, drinks.

This is too good of a deal to pass up since most drinks in this country are in the 350 to 500 yen range, and NO refills!

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Costco also sells trucks and cars, via its referral service.

I know, I got a great deal on a pair of shrinkwrapped Jeep Cherokees.

It's funny to see the "Kirkland Signature" products all over the US, because Kirkland is nothing more or less than a Seattle suburb that happens to be Costco headquarters. It makes as much sense as "Yonkers Signature." What would be great is if Costco were a Portland company and the brand was "Beaverton Signature."

Nobody's mentioned the free samples, have they? Has anyone had anything good recently?

Matthew Amster-Burton, aka "mamster"

Author, Hungry Monkey, coming in May

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Nobody's mentioned the free samples, have they?  Has anyone had anything good recently?

When I was in the states last month, I tried eggnog for the first time at Costco, it was quite good.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Costco also sells trucks and cars, via its referral service.

I know, I got a great deal on a pair of shrinkwrapped Jeep Cherokees.

It's funny to see the "Kirkland Signature" products all over the US, because Kirkland is nothing more or less than a Seattle suburb that happens to be Costco headquarters. It makes as much sense as "Yonkers Signature." What would be great is if Costco were a Portland company and the brand was "Beaverton Signature."

Nobody's mentioned the free samples, have they? Has anyone had anything good recently?

When I moved to Kirkland, I quickly rushed to Costco and bought everything Kirkland Signature.

Ben

Gimme what cha got for a pork chop!

-Freakmaster

I have two words for America... Meat Crust.

-Mario

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Costco ownership had originally been Price Club executives. Sol Price, who was the founder of Price Club, started here in San Diego. His son, Robert Price, heads the group that is now largely the owners-managers of the real estate holdings occupied by Costco. They're a wonderful family and benefactors to many organizations in our area.

While most of the packaged food items are suited for large families, the quality is great and we sometimes make a run to stock up on items that far exceed the value we can find elsewhere. Fresh baked goods may have to go into the freezer, but they're wonderful and so reasonably priced.

Out here in CA, they're the place to buy auto tires. I believe they're the largest Michilin dealer.

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Has anyone tasted the Costco Apple Pie?  What do you think?

It is a great bargain if ever there was any.  A bargain not in quality but for the low price you pay for good quality.

I love the Costco apple pie very much. My only complaint is that the pie is too big. I can never finish them, even when I have help. :biggrin:

A gigantic, pie with deliciously tart, firm apples, and a golden, sugar-coated crust for $6. What is there to dislike?

There's half of one in my refrigerator right now. :biggrin:

Try their dinner rolls.

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I was there today! In Hawaii, there is a selection of fresh sushi. The fresh fish is really great (ahi, mahi, opah, opkakapka, tilapia (yuck), salmon, and trout). There is also a booth selling about 15 types of poke (raw fish and seafood mixtures). Another booth had Alaskan crab, NZ clams, whole salmon etc... There is an isle that is all kimchee plus kalua pig and turkey (this is fresh). Maui onions, big island tomatoes, plus locally grown lettuce and cucumbers (those I still buy at the farmers market.

The asian food isle is huge (though you must buy miso and sambal olek in massive quantities). Dried whatever, noodles galore, rice in every variety.

Surfboards, diving gear, Chinese furniture, surf shorts, aloha shirts, Hawaiian jewelery. Hawaiian flowers, avocadoes, dresses, shirts, quilts, pillows. I can never spend less then $80.

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Nobody's mentioned the free samples, have they?  Has anyone had anything good recently?

In the New York-area Costcos, the free sample culture is rather cutthroat. It's not like at the nice Midwestern Costcos where you walk around and a smiling AARP type gives you a slice of sausage on a toothpick while saying, "You can use this in a casserole . . ." Here, it's more like the customers saying, "Psst. How many minutes left on the ravioli? Two?" And then, Arnold-like, "I'll be back." As soon as a batch of whatever comes out of the little oven or electric kettle, a crowd gathers. Often each person takes five or six of whatever it is, loudly proclaiming, "This one for my son; this one for my husband . . ." If you're lucky enough to get a piece of whatever it is, you feel quite triumphant. If you do this with five or six items, it's a strategy game and a meal in one.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Karen--how much of your prepared/commercial/frozen selection comes from the mainland? Do you have the same bags of frozen chicken parts and Kirkland-branded items that we might have at Costcos all across the US?

Steve Klc

Pastry chef-Restaurant Consultant

Oyamel : Zaytinya : Cafe Atlantico : Jaleo

chef@pastryarts.com

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Nobody's mentioned the free samples, have they?  Has anyone had anything good recently?

Had a piece of Fletcher's bacon at the Lancaster, PA store the other day. Good stuff.

-- Jeff

"I don't care to belong to a club that accepts people like me as members." -- Groucho Marx

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In the New York-area Costcos, the free sample culture is rather cutthroat. It's not like at the nice Midwestern Costcos where you walk around and a smiling AARP type gives you a slice of sausage on a toothpick while saying, "You can use this in a casserole . . ." Here, it's more like the customers saying, "Psst. How many minutes left on the ravioli? Two?" And then, Arnold-like, "I'll be back." As soon as a batch of whatever comes out of the little oven or electric kettle, a crowd gathers. Often each person takes five or six of whatever it is, loudly proclaiming, "This one for my son; this one for my husband . . ." If you're lucky enough to get a piece of whatever it is, you feel quite triumphant. If you do this with five or six items, it's a strategy game and a meal in one.

Sorry, FG. I don't know what happens in other areas of the Midwest, but in Chicago at the Damen/Clyborn/Diversey location, it's every man for himself. The scene is almost as you describe. People congregate around the booth when there is a particular item that still has a few more minutes in the cooker. My cousin and I had an entire conversation about mattresses while we were waiting for catfish samples. People take more than one toothpick-full with the lamest excuses, then they get back in line and do it again. About one month ago, while shopping for New Year's Day dinner, a woman got into a screaming match with another woman around the leg of lamb booth. She had been nudged by the other woman's cart one too many times while waiting in line. Similar fits have broken out over being skipped, and the samples are free! Some people send their children in to do their dirty work while they hang out close by looking at the books or the DVDs (great DVDs BTW). I think that's a nice, Chicago, cutthroat touch.

The patient, Midwestern gentility of which you speak does not exist in this town when something of value is free for the taking.

AND, the people handing out the samples are quite capable women with stern attitudes and loud voices. They're quite adept at maintaining order. The AARP types can be found at Sam's where they belong. :laugh:

Has anyone tried the gigantic chicken pot pies?

Edited by Aurora (log)
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Steve KlC, I have wondered about that. I have been in a lot of Costcos, visiting friends and family. The frozen chicken and butter look the same to me. I know that the cheese selection has gotten much better (fresh buffalo mozzarella, grated reggiano, etc...)

Honolulu seems to have the same "regular items", but a huge local targeting. You can buy surfboards, Chinese rosewood furniture, Hawaiian jewelry, and all kinds of local products from lettuce to backpacks and clothing. The prices are the same as the mainland except for meat/wine/liquor.

Karen

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Nobody's mentioned the free samples, have they?  Has anyone had anything good recently?

In the New York-area Costcos, the free sample culture is rather cutthroat. It's not like at the nice Midwestern Costcos where you walk around and a smiling AARP type gives you a slice of sausage on a toothpick while saying, "You can use this in a casserole . . ." Here, it's more like the customers saying, "Psst. How many minutes left on the ravioli? Two?" And then, Arnold-like, "I'll be back." As soon as a batch of whatever comes out of the little oven or electric kettle, a crowd gathers. Often each person takes five or six of whatever it is, loudly proclaiming, "This one for my son; this one for my husband . . ." If you're lucky enough to get a piece of whatever it is, you feel quite triumphant. If you do this with five or six items, it's a strategy game and a meal in one.

My son volunteers at the Senior Center in our NJ town. They readily confess to him that they go to the Edison, NJ, Costco several times weekly for a free lunch worth of samples. I've coincidentally been there at the same time as their group visits. Whew - don't go anywhere near a senior who is brandishing a cocktail toothpick while eating their free lunch! They know exactly when each new item will be ready and glide between each saute pan for their sample. They use their shopping cart as a pusher to get to the front of the line. :wacko:

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The patient, Midwestern gentility of which you speak does not exist in this town when something of value is free for the taking.

AND, the people handing out the samples are quite capable women with stern attitudes and loud voices.  They're quite adept at maintaining order.  The AARP types can be found at Sam's where they belong. :laugh:

The Costcos where I am (metro Detroit) are pretty laid-back when it comes to samples. No pushing or shoving or anything like that (although I think it would be quite a sight!).

The Costco where I usually shop is known as a seen-and-be-seen kind of location. A bit strange, I know. Every time I go, I can count on seeing at least two women wearing fur coats.

The local paper even wrote an article about it:

Clickie

I'm sure there are plenty of other Costcos in the country like this?

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