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Home Made Ice Cream (2015– )


Darienne
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My huckleberry ice cream.  I puree the berries before adding them to the custard base, then I served with a huckleberry compote on the side or over the top.  The recipe is delicious with any summer berry.

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1 ½ cups whole milk

1 ½ cups heavy cream

½" piece vanilla bean, cut in half, seeds scraped out

4 egg yolks

¾ cup granulated sugar

¾ cup huckleberries, pureed

½ cup whole huckleberries for garnish

 

In a heavy saucepan over medium heat, add the milk, cream, vanilla bean and seeds.

 

In the bowl of a mixer, add the egg yolks and sugar. Stir the milk and cream as it heats. Slowly whisk ½ cup of milk mixture into the egg mixture and whisk. This tempers the egg mixture and keeps it from scrambling. Pour the egg mixture into the saucepan with the cream and whisk to combine. Lower the heat to medium-low and stir the ice cream base with a wooden spoon and cook for about 12-15 minutes until it thickens and coats the back of the spoon. Pour the ice cream custard through a strainer into a container, then cover and refrigerate overnight.

 

The next day, pour the ice cream custard into an ice cream maker and pour in the pureed huckleberries, process until it becomes thick like soft-serve ice cream. Spread the ice cream in a container, cover and freeze until ready to serve.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I saw many "no-churn" techniques on youtube for ice cream.   I gave it a go.

 

1 can evaporated milk (most recipes say use condensed milk, I decided I would add the sweetness separately, plus I have a bunch of evap milk in my pantry for some unknown reason)

1 package cream cheese, cheap store brand

8 fl oz whipping cream, TJ's shelf stable

 

You mix/blend the evap milk and cream cheese together.  Here I added in the flavorings.

1 batch was jar of Ube jam blended in.   This was plenty sweet for the ice cream

Whip the cream (with a bit of vanilla extract) and fold into the flavored mixture.  Freeze for several hours, or just default to 1 day.

It's lightly purple and has a floral vanilla flavor.  Ube tastes like vanilla to me so it's always a very pleasant taste profile.

 

2nd batch was a butter rum/butterscotch flavor.  I made a homemade invert sugar and let it slightly caramelize.  About a cup, which was too much, too sweet (1/2 cup would be desired).  I also was too generous with the LorAnn Butter Rum flavoring,   It's a strongly flavored ice cream, almost boozy without booze.

 

All in all, if I can dial in the flavor technique better,  the texture is quite like standard churned ice cream.  

Edited by lemniscate (log)
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  • 1 month later...
On 8/12/2021 at 6:51 PM, ccp900 said:

for those who use an immersion cooker to cook your base. how would the temps/times change when you use a mason jar to cook instead of a zip lock bag. im tired of throwing these things out. such a waste! 

 

im going to go use a 1L ball mason jar just to limit the waste but need the insights of those who have shifted. depending on the flavor and my mood i use 3 temps/times. 65c for 1 hour / 75c for 30 mins / 85c for 5 mins.  these are all usinf zip lock bags though, i am wondering how it will change going to mason jars

 

This is hard to answer, because it's not easy to model the heat transfer from a water bath into a liquid in a container. The speed of heating changes with the size and shape of the container and the viscosity of the liquid. No matter what, it takes a long time for the liquid to come up to temperature. This is why cooking an ice cream base sous-vide is more pretend-precise than actual precise.

 

I still do it this for my own ice cream at home, because it works well enough, and with the batch sizes I make (in ziploc bags) the process is repeatable and gives consistent results with good control over the final temperature. But for my commercial clients I always recommend a pasteurizer, or some equivalent thing that directly heats the liquid while stirring it.

 

If you want to try jars, it would work better with a few smaller ones than with one big one. And you might want to interrupt the process to shake or stir them a few times in the first half hour (you can use this as an opportunity to get a temperature reading and check your progress).

 

Throwing out the ziploc bags is indeed wasteful. If I made ice cream more often I'd consider switching to a pasteurizer, or a lab hot plate with magnetic stirrer and temp probe.

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Notes from the underbelly

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Tonight I improvised a batch of Modernist peanut butter gelato.  It is confusing because there are two very different Modernist gelato recipes and of the original recipe there are two quite different methods.

 

I've made peanut butter gelato based both on the MC pistachio gelato recipe and on the MC@H pistachio gelato recipe.  I find the original MC version superior to and no more difficult than the MC@H version.

 

Tonight's batch of peanut butter was based on the original MC pistachio gelato.  The major difference is that I wanted to test tara gum in place of locust bean gum.  Herewith were my ingredients:

 

Water 680g

Jif Natural peanut butter 210g

Golden sugar 140g

Roasted peanut oil 100g

Salt 4g

Tara gum 1g

Lambda Carrageenan 2g

Glycerol Monostearate 1.5g

Polysorbate 80 0.8g

 

 

Be aware Jif Natural contains palm oil, sugar, salt, and molasses.  I compensated.  Also note tara gum is more efficient than locust bean gum, so I reduced the amount of gum accordingly.

 

The original MC recipe and method is here:

https://modernistcuisine.com/recipes/pistachio-gelato/

 

A video showing the modified MC method that I followed is here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pFzRFk94NQQ

 

Be aware that there is no need to boil these hydrocolloids, no matter what @nathanm might say.  I suspect boiling may damage them.  I heated just to 90C.

 

An unappetizing skin formed on the mix while chilling.  Next time I might skip the chilling step entirely and go directly to the blast freezer.  I don't see the need for chilling, but that is what the video said to do.  Disclaimer:  I didn't stir my mix while chilling which may have been my fault.

 

 

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Tara gum is a galactomannan similar to guar and locust bean gums. Supposedly its properties are somewhere between those of the other two. LBG has strong ice crystal suppression, and relatively little noticeable effect on the ice cream's thickness or chewiness. Guar is weaker at ice crystal suppression, but has a strong thickening effect. The two are superadditive; using them together allows you to use a lower total quantity than using any one of them alone. 

 

I imagine tara gum is a pretty good single-gum solution based on this. It wouldn't offer the flexibility of mixing and matching guar and LBG.  

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Notes from the underbelly

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  • 3 months later...
On 8/29/2021 at 11:31 AM, David Ross said:

My huckleberry ice cream.  I puree the berries before adding them to the custard base, then I served with a huckleberry compote on the side or over the top.  The recipe is delicious with any summer berry.

Featured (2).JPG

 

1 ½ cups whole milk

1 ½ cups heavy cream

½" piece vanilla bean, cut in half, seeds scraped out

4 egg yolks

¾ cup granulated sugar

¾ cup huckleberries, pureed

½ cup whole huckleberries for garnish

 

In a heavy saucepan over medium heat, add the milk, cream, vanilla bean and seeds.

 

In the bowl of a mixer, add the egg yolks and sugar. Stir the milk and cream as it heats. Slowly whisk ½ cup of milk mixture into the egg mixture and whisk. This tempers the egg mixture and keeps it from scrambling. Pour the egg mixture into the saucepan with the cream and whisk to combine. Lower the heat to medium-low and stir the ice cream base with a wooden spoon and cook for about 12-15 minutes until it thickens and coats the back of the spoon. Pour the ice cream custard through a strainer into a container, then cover and refrigerate overnight.

 

The next day, pour the ice cream custard into an ice cream maker and pour in the pureed huckleberries, process until it becomes thick like soft-serve ice cream. Spread the ice cream in a container, cover and freeze until ready to serve.

The texture of your ice cream looks TDF.

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7 hours ago, BooBear said:

Anyone try out melissa clark's recipe for custard ice cream?

 

 

Not that exact recipe, but a couple of tips if you decide to try this style - whisking the sugar with the egg yolks instead of adding the sugar to the liquids will make the yolks less likely to scramble when the hot liquid is added.  Also have an ice bath ready for that hot custard to stop the cooking. 

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4 minutes ago, pastrygirl said:

 

Not that exact recipe, but a couple of tips if you decide to try this style - whisking the sugar with the egg yolks instead of adding the sugar to the liquids will make the yolks less likely to scramble when the hot liquid is added.  Also have an ice bath ready for that hot custard to stop the cooking. 

Thanks for the heads up.

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4 minutes ago, pastrygirl said:

 

Not that exact recipe, but a couple of tips if you decide to try this style - whisking the sugar with the egg yolks instead of adding the sugar to the liquids will make the yolks less likely to scramble when the hot liquid is added.  Also have an ice bath ready for that hot custard to stop the cooking. 

 

I'll second the recommendation to whisk the sugar with the egg yolks.

 

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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4 hours ago, paulraphael said:

Why not just add the yolks and everything else to the cold liquid? I haven't tempered an egg yolk in years. 

 

I haven't tempered an egg yolk in decades* either -- however when I add yolks and everything else to the cold liquid of an ice cream base, what I get is scrambled eggs.  Granted with some effort the egg solids can be strained out, but the result is still gross and disgusting.  Paul, I thought you were the one who did not favor eggs in ice cream?

 

My method is to beat the yolks into the sugars and other dry ingredients, and then stir in the cold milk and cream.  Works like a charm each time.

 

 

* with the possible exception of Dinah Shore's wonderful rice pudding recipe.  Though that is a different topic.

 

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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5 or 6 ingredients, depending on whether it's their Vanilla ice cream, or their Vanilla Bean ice cream.

 

Quote

Not just anyone can take 5 simple ingredients – cream, milk, eggs, sugar and Madagascar vanilla – and make it this good.

 

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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34 minutes ago, weinoo said:

5 or 6 ingredients, depending on whether it's their Vanilla ice cream, or their Vanilla Bean ice cream.

 

 

The most brilliant moment is when she uses the rolling pin to straighten and flatten the vanilla beans. Of course you do need to start with moist fresh vanilla beans. Sadly the state of vanilla beans is still not what it used to be.

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14 minutes ago, BooBear said:

Anyone who has tried David Lebovitz's ice cream recipes please chime in. Are any of his recipes too sweet or not sweet enough compared to haagen daz?

 

I've made several of his ice cream recipes, both from his blog and his book.  They work well and I enjoyed them.  I've never done a side-by-side sweetness level comparison with his recipes and Haagen Daz

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1 minute ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

I've made several of his ice cream recipes, both from his blog and his book.  They work well and I enjoyed them.  I've never done a side-by-side sweetness level comparison with his recipes and Haagen Daz

Do you feel like making your own ice cream from his book is worth the time and effort?

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