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Home Made Ice Cream (2015– )


Darienne
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5 hours ago, Synerge said:

 

That happens with basically everything. Probably the point for most of the people that make ice creams at home is to actually change the recipes and adapt them to their own liking

For me its something different. The gelatos that are made in my country are way too good, so the reason is price, it cost me about 1/5 1/6 of the price of the gelato shop, and thats a lot. I also like all this. Although I find the entire pasteurization and rapid freezing process exhausting and messy. The aging and churning process is rather simple

 

I do understand everyones points of view and reasons, but mostly for flavor. For texture, I dont think you can go better than what a pro machine can offer. Its extremely smooth. And if you talk about overrun (air), you can control that, so there is really much point on arguing about that

I dont know, for me its always trying to improve and get better. And no, I'm not talking about appareance, as I'm not a gourmet chef, unless it looks disgusting, there is no point on working on that, flavor and texture are everything in ice cream

 

I think I will go for a banana ice cream next, and a lemon sorbet as I bought way too many lemons :P. Sorbets are usually the hardest to make, specially those that have really low solid percentage like lemon

A really good advice that I found while trying, is to freeze the mix before churning as much as possible. If you can, leave it in the freezer until it reaches 0ºc before putting it in the machine. The result will be much better, as it will reach the desired temp a lot faster and the machine will suffer less. That means smaller ice crystals, and better texture as soon as you get it out of the machine

 

As I've said before, for me ice cream -- whether commercial or manufactured in my kitchen -- is all about texture and mouthfeel.  I am happy to eat unflavored.  Chocolate, vanilla, strawberry, or garlic.

 

 

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8 hours ago, weinoo said:

 

I think I do pretty well at home, my ice cream is very smooth and I'd also be willing to say that it's better than some of what's offered professionally. 

 

I'm not doing better than Il Lab, but I like my ice cream more than Ben & Jerry's, for example.

 

Thats quite impressive. Although I cannot imagine it at all, because I have no idea what those shops are, but it's great that you achieved so much progress

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IMG_3531.thumb.jpeg.a9b150f038760d09df3a61079708ec96.jpeg

 

Lemon Sorbet - a recipe from one of those California Culinary Academy cookbooks from the 80's - this is essentially an Italian Meringue with lemon juice added at the end, then spun in the machine. Only thing it needs is a raspberry coulis and to be shaped in quenelles!

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22 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

Lemon Sorbet - a recipe from one of those California Culinary Academy cookbooks from the 80's - this is essentially an Italian Meringue with lemon juice added at the end, then spun in the machine. Only thing it needs is a raspberry coulis and to be shaped in quenelles!

 

Looks good! It actually looks like a lemon ice cream. I believe that it means its' correctly done.

I made one batch yesterday and it looked like that too. I didn't took any photos though, I was in a rush making ice cream to take to a reunion :(

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  • 2 weeks later...

Is there any reason why I can't make half batches of custard based  ice cream?  We love ice cream but it takes a while to get through a full batch.  Plus, I'd like to have two options to choose from rather than one.  I have a Breville ice cream maker with a built-in compressor, if that makes any difference.

Edited by ElsieD
Added reference to Breville (log)
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26 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

Is there any reason why I can't make half batches of custard based  ice cream?  We love ice cream but it takes a while to get through a full batch.  Plus, I'd like to have two options to choose from rather than one.  I have a Breville ice cream maker with a built-in compressor, if that makes any difference.

Don't see any reason why not!

 

The advantage of the compressor you can make batch after batch.

 

K

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5 hours ago, ElsieD said:

Is there any reason why I can't make half batches of custard based  ice cream?  We love ice cream but it takes a while to get through a full batch.  Plus, I'd like to have two options to choose from rather than one.  I have a Breville ice cream maker with a built-in compressor, if that makes any difference.

 

There is a minimum on every machine, be it homemade or commercial, usually its 50% of the capacity or maybe 60%, so you should be able to make half batch

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On 7/26/2021 at 10:19 PM, ElsieD said:

Is there any reason why I can't make half batches of custard based  ice cream?  We love ice cream but it takes a while to get through a full batch.  Plus, I'd like to have two options to choose from rather than one.  I have a Breville ice cream maker with a built-in compressor, if that makes any difference.

no reason why you cant. with your machine you can probably batch 400/450g and with overrun thats a little over a pint so totally doable. with my old ice 100 i ran 500g batches for testing and it worked well. 

 

your churn time will be faster which is good too

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The problem I run into when making half batches (expecting about a pint of ice cream) is that between the stuff that I really can't get out of the ice cream container and the stuff that remains on the dasher (which, by the way, all gets eaten while I'm "decanting") is that I really only end up with about 2/3 of a pint.  

 

I've taken to doing either 2/3 or 3/4 of a recipe. Works well for me.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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6 hours ago, weinoo said:

The problem I run into when making half batches (expecting about a pint of ice cream) is that between the stuff that I really can't get out of the ice cream container and the stuff that remains on the dasher (which, by the way, all gets eaten while I'm "decanting") is that I really only end up with about 2/3 of a pint.  

 

I've taken to doing either 2/3 or 3/4 of a recipe. Works well for me.

 

But if that is the case, then you also lose quite a lot when doing a full batch.

Have in mind, that if you pasteurize the mix, a good portion will evaporate. That will mostly depend on the method used and how efficiently/fast you are making the whole process, but I think is quite normal to lose 10% of the mix or even more just by pasteurizing

You can also lose a little part of the mix when transfering from one container to another one. And maybe a little more when withdrawing the ice cream from the machine

Improving all this steps makes you lose less percentage of the final mix, and that is obviously good as you get more ice cream in the end, and have a better cost use. Although, most of what evaporates is water anyway

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Known elsewhere as "the angel's share" or in our house, husband's.    There is loss in any cooking process.   I joke that we could live on what is left in a restaurant pot.    Or as my mother use to preach, Westerners make a cream soup and lose a goodly portion on pan and utensils. while clear Asian soups leave nothing behind.   

eGullet member #80.

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4 hours ago, Synerge said:

Improving all this steps makes you lose less percentage of the final mix, and that is obviously good as you get more ice cream in the end, and have a better cost use. Although, most of what evaporates is water anyway

 

Talk to the guy trying to make soup.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 7/1/2021 at 12:26 AM, Synerge said:

 

Actually, I think that the fat relation with taste goes the other way around. For example in USA they increased a lot fat content as it gave the ice cream a different texture and flavour

One thing is certain, while more fat you have, more creamy is the ice cream. Because fat does not freeze, so you have less water, so less ice problems

Obviously, on the other side, fat is extremely unhealthy, specially if you are planning to eat ice cream on a regular basis. A 10% fat content is a lot more balanced, and it comes out great. You can also go for italy's gelatos that go from 4% to 8% top. In argentina, the gelatos usually go from 7% to 10%. For me, 6% is a little to low, 8% sounds better in all the cases. I try to get values between 8 and 10

 

Chocolate is probably the most difficult ice cream to do, because the main compontent, that is chocolate, is quite complex, and changes everything in the formula. It has fats, sugars, solids. Everything. Also, the quality and type of chocolate change everything aswell

Your finding is interesting, you say that with a smaller POD, the chocolate taste doesn't stand out too much. In the contrary, if you increase sweetness, the flavour is better. That maybe depends on the chocolate you are using. Also have in mind that chocolate itself is really high on fat.

Post your recipe so we can check what is going on. Although I have no experiene in this, maybe others that do like chocolate can say something about it. I can only say that chocolate is really bitter, specially if you go more to pure chocolate. Milk chocolate on the other half, or maybe even white chocolate, completely different taste

 

The relationship of fat to flavor really depends on the flavor. Some flavors are carried by it, others are muted by it. I don't believe any flavors benefit from a fat level above 16% or so, but some, like fat-soluble spices (vanilla) seem to do best around there. Other flavors, like fruits and coffee, are most vibrant and intense at low fat levels. 

 

I agree with you about chocolate. The main culprit is cocoa butter, which causes problems not just because of its abundance but because of its hardness at cold temperatures. The sugar and solids aren't so hard to compensate for, but the cocoa butter's always a problem. Using cocoa powder would be the solution, but chocolate companies still think of it as a byproduct. It's what's left over after extracting cocoa butter (which they use for white chocolate or to sell as an industrial ingredient) and they don't pay much attention to the powders provenance. Companies like Michel Cluizel and Valrhona do sell better cocoa powder than other companies ... but it's nothing like the quality of their own single-origin chocolates. This is not because it has to be so; they just haven't identified this as a market.

 

Callebaut is now advertising single-origin cocoa powders to their professional customers. But I don't see a distributor in the US and they won't return my calls. Some smaller makers in the US are making fancy cocoa powder. But last I checked none had the (expensive) machine needed to mill it to a fine texture. So your ice cream would be gritty. 

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On 7/12/2021 at 7:00 AM, weinoo said:

Is there any need to use an homogenizer when starting with homogenized milk?

 

I don't believe I use any emulsifiers either. I've pretty much settled on Dana Cree's methodology.

 

 

If you're making uncooked bases, there probably isn't any benefit to a homogenizer. When you cook/pasteurize an ice cream base, the fat globules get more mobile and glom onto each other, making fewer bigger globules that result in a worse foam structure and texture. The homogenizing step happens right after cooking, when the fat is still hot and liquid. In order of effectiveness:

doing nothing < regular blender / stick blender < high-powered blender < rotor-stator homogenizer (like Jo's) < ultrasonic homogenizer < high-pressure homogenizer (like what the dairy uses). 

 

Emulsifiers, in my experience (and depending on flavor) make a small but noticeable difference in smoothness and foam quality. Contrary to common sense, they're not used to emulsify the ice cream at all. Milk and cream are already perfectly good emulsions; the surface-active components of the milk proteins do the emulsifying, and the industrial homogenizer at the dairy makes everything stable. We actually add emulsifiers to partially destabilize the emulsion. Added emulsifiers pluck some of the milk proteins away from the fat globules, making it easier for the fat globules to partially coalesce and form a foam structure.

 

Consider that part of the structure of ice cream is whipped cream ... we're trying to make whipped cream with a much lower fat percentage than we usually would. Anything that helps destabilize the milk and cream make this much easier. It takes very little ... there's probably enough lecithin in 1/4 egg yolk to do it for a liter of ice cream. 

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20 hours ago, paulraphael said:

If you're making uncooked bases, there probably isn't any benefit to a homogenizer. When you cook/pasteurize an ice cream base, the fat globules get more mobile and glom onto each other, making fewer bigger globules that result in a worse foam structure and texture. The homogenizing step happens right after cooking, when the fat is still hot and liquid. In order of effectiveness:

doing nothing < regular blender / stick blender < high-powered blender < rotor-stator homogenizer (like Jo's) < ultrasonic homogenizer < high-pressure homogenizer (like what the dairy uses). 

 

Emulsifiers, in my experience (and depending on flavor) make a small but noticeable difference in smoothness and foam quality. Contrary to common sense, they're not used to emulsify the ice cream at all. Milk and cream are already perfectly good emulsions; the surface-active components of the milk proteins do the emulsifying, and the industrial homogenizer at the dairy makes everything stable. We actually add emulsifiers to partially destabilize the emulsion. Added emulsifiers pluck some of the milk proteins away from the fat globules, making it easier for the fat globules to partially coalesce and form a foam structure.

 

Consider that part of the structure of ice cream is whipped cream ... we're trying to make whipped cream with a much lower fat percentage than we usually would. Anything that helps destabilize the milk and cream make this much easier. It takes very little ... there's probably enough lecithin in 1/4 egg yolk to do it for a liter of ice cream. 

 

Welcome back

There are actually many scientific researchs testing how each emulsifier acts on the ice cream, and what changes when the percentage varies. Also with mixing emulsifiers. Although there are not many emulsifiers to be honest. Stabilizers on the other hand, there are too many and their properties are completely different between each other. They test it with different tools and machines, the results are quite insightful

There is also improvement using emulsifiers on non-fat ice creams, as its gives them a better texture

 

Im using right now Monoesterate + Tween 80. For stabilizers Locust + Guar + Carrogenan. Its working quite well

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for those who use an immersion cooker to cook your base. how would the temps/times change when you use a mason jar to cook instead of a zip lock bag. im tired of throwing these things out. such a waste! 

 

im going to go use a 1L ball mason jar just to limit the waste but need the insights of those who have shifted. depending on the flavor and my mood i use 3 temps/times. 65c for 1 hour / 75c for 30 mins / 85c for 5 mins.  these are all usinf zip lock bags though, i am wondering how it will change going to mason jars

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On 8/9/2021 at 5:40 PM, paulraphael said:

 

The relationship of fat to flavor really depends on the flavor. Some flavors are carried by it, others are muted by it. I don't believe any flavors benefit from a fat level above 16% or so, but some, like fat-soluble spices (vanilla) seem to do best around there. Other flavors, like fruits and coffee, are most vibrant and intense at low fat levels. 

 

I agree with you about chocolate. The main culprit is cocoa butter, which causes problems not just because of its abundance but because of its hardness at cold temperatures. The sugar and solids aren't so hard to compensate for, but the cocoa butter's always a problem. Using cocoa powder would be the solution, but chocolate companies still think of it as a byproduct. It's what's left over after extracting cocoa butter (which they use for white chocolate or to sell as an industrial ingredient) and they don't pay much attention to the powders provenance. Companies like Michel Cluizel and Valrhona do sell better cocoa powder than other companies ... but it's nothing like the quality of their own single-origin chocolates. This is not because it has to be so; they just haven't identified this as a market.

 

Callebaut is now advertising single-origin cocoa powders to their professional customers. But I don't see a distributor in the US and they won't return my calls. Some smaller makers in the US are making fancy cocoa powder. But last I checked none had the (expensive) machine needed to mill it to a fine texture. So your ice cream would be gritty. 

Paul, perhaps of interest to you, we started infusing vodka with very high quality cocoa nibs.   After a few months, the result it a rich, chocolate alcohol.    I use a couple of tablespoons in appropriately flavored ice creams as a flavor booster and texture ameliorate.  

eGullet member #80.

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2 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Paul, perhaps of interest to you, we started infusing vodka with very high quality cocoa nibs.   After a few months, the result it a rich, chocolate alcohol.    I use a couple of tablespoons in appropriately flavored ice creams as a flavor booster and texture ameliorate.  

Margaret, this is of interest! Do you have any general guidelines you use for nibs to vodka ratio?

"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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3 minutes ago, BeeZee said:

Margaret, this is of interest! Do you have any general guidelines you use for nibs to vodka ratio?

I’m not Margaret, so I know you didn’t ask me but I’ve been using the proportions from a David Lebovitz recipe: 75g roasted cocoa nibs in 430 ml vodka.  Swirl every day or so for at least a week, then strain.  He adds 1 tsp vanilla and sweetens it at this point. 

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Interesting and amusing.   We ransacked France trying to buy eau de vie de cacao, which we finally admitted was no longer made by anyone (at that time).    So we bought nibs at Alain Ducasse (because it was convenient) and made our own, guessing at quantities.    I guess Libovitz came to the same conclusion also.   

 

It makes a luscious product, round and intense, much richer than fruit eau de vies.  I am not sure that our nibs are roasted...

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eGullet member #80.

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Here are a couple of interesting products, probably impossible to source here...

 

image.png.a8ade64cbd372046ef6c081475a2fc08.png

https://www.prestigioytradicion.com/en/product/kko-destilado-de-cacao-50cl/

 

image.thumb.png.777d87939409ef96c49f4d14eacc9fec.png

 

https://www.thecanberradistillery.com.au/shop/cocoa-liqueur/

 

 

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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2 hours ago, weinoo said:

Here are a couple of interesting products, probably impossible to source here...

 

image.png.a8ade64cbd372046ef6c081475a2fc08.png

https://www.prestigioytradicion.com/en/product/kko-destilado-de-cacao-50cl/

 

image.thumb.png.777d87939409ef96c49f4d14eacc9fec.png

 

https://www.thecanberradistillery.com.au/shop/cocoa-liqueur/

 

 

Thanks for these.    The one(s) we were chasing were sugar free, literally eau de vies.    Pure flavor in alcohol.    But these would be very interesting ice cream inclusions.   

eGullet member #80.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Simple chocolate chip ice cream using my freezer bowl Cuisinart. Thanks to everyone for posting so much ice cream, it got me to make some of my own.

 

1690197424_IMG_6790-icecream-chocolateribbons.jpg.86f7f5dc3e6df779da5fba3a11b63335.jpg

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