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Need help with sous vide timing and temperature for beef and pork


Josh71
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Hi all,

 

I bought vacuum packed roast beef and kind of pork, see in the attached photo.

 

The size is about 15 cm x 10 cm and the height is about 6 to 7 cm, with weight 785 grams (from the package).

 

Anyone can suggest the timing and the temperature for sous vide if I want to have "medium" for the beef and "well-done" for the pork?

 

I have never sous vide this size of meat before :)

 

My plan is to sous vide it first on their own vacuum sealed package, probably 1 day before.

 

Then simply sear it before serving to get browned.

 

Thanks!

IMG_20151228_102545.jpg

Edited by Smithy
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As I'm sure you're aware, sv times are dependent on thickness, bath temp and core temp. Using a bath that is just over your core temp will result in the even cooking that most love sv for, but will take the longest time. To specifically answer your question, I'd advise using either Sous Vide Dash (a VERY useful app if you do lots of sv cooking) or you can use the charts provided by nathanm many years ago in the original sous vide thread.

 

However, part of me wants to know why you'd bother cooking the pork roast well donev SV... Wouldn't it be easier and faster to roast conventionally?

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13 minutes ago, KennethT said:

As I'm sure you're aware, sv times are dependent on thickness, bath temp and core temp. Using a bath that is just over your core temp will result in the even cooking that most love sv for, but will take the longest time. To specifically answer your question, I'd advise using either Sous Vide Dash (a VERY useful app if you do lots of sv cooking) or you can use the charts provided by nathanm many years ago in the original sous vide thread.

 

However, part of me wants to know why you'd bother cooking the pork roast well donev SV... Wouldn't it be easier and faster to roast conventionally?

 

I don't have that app, and I think that's iOS only?

 

I tried to search it on the sous vide index post, strange that it's not there.

 

About the pork roast well done using sv, that's because I don't want to over cook it if using conventional method. And this is for later New Year celebration, many of my friends, I think would still think pork should be well done :)

Edited by Josh71 (log)
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Yes unfortunately the sv dash is ios only. However nathanm's tables require no operating system. I'd figure the timing for you but I'm on vacation and dont have access to sv dash or the tables which i printed years ago and searching for the tables on my phone seems less than pleasant. I'm sure if you wait a few hours for people to wake up someone can help you more specifically than I.

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the firsts question, do you think either cut is tough ?   this is were SV shines.  

 

Baldwin :  for beef medium is 140, for pork  the same

 

but Id go lower, 135 or so for both.  why dry out that pork which looks lean.

 

beef, tender cut  :  135  8 - 12 H   tough cut :  24 - 48

 

Pork ;  loin 4 - 5  135  shoulder 24 - 48   'rib meat'  8 - 12

 

these won't be any thing like an oven roast.  they will be much better.  with browning, alway use a lower temp.  135 you might like for both

 

its said that fresh herbs become intense if placed on roasts, as noted on your meats.

 

you will find out.  your choices for times and temps w pick would be interesting to see post-SV

 

but of luck   SV: less ends up being better re temps, as long as you pick the correct times.

 

 

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a PS :  remember this :  SV can make tough cuts tender, and will keep tender cuts tender. Flavor and juiciness is retained in the meet at lower SV temps.

 

Slice thin.

 

bookmark this site :

 

http://www.douglasbaldwin.com/sous-vide.html

 

I have the book, but douglas Baldwin was nice enough to put all the info you need for SV on line.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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5 hours ago, rotuts said:

the firsts question, do you think either cut is tough ?   this is were SV shines.  

 

Baldwin :  for beef medium is 140, for pork  the same

 

but Id go lower, 135 or so for both.  why dry out that pork which looks lean.

 

beef, tender cut  :  135  8 - 12 H   tough cut :  24 - 48

 

Pork ;  loin 4 - 5  135  shoulder 24 - 48   'rib meat'  8 - 12

 

these won't be any thing like an oven roast.  they will be much better.  with browning, alway use a lower temp.  135 you might like for both

 

its said that fresh herbs become intense if placed on roasts, as noted on your meats.

 

you will find out.  your choices for times and temps w pick would be interesting to see post-SV

 

but of luck   SV: less ends up being better re temps, as long as you pick the correct times.

 

 

 

Thanks!

 

Both are tender cuts, but I don't know which cut of beef/pork. It is not mentioned in the package :)

 

8 hours for the beef and 5 hours for the pork. Hmm ... it seems quite long. I guess, I must do it a day before lol.

 

Thinking about the temperature though. I would do the pork well done at 68C (145F) and the beef medium at 58C (136F).

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fine.  you are starting out.

 

re pork :  Im guessing its a loin.  you will learn from this and become a SV Fanatic.

 

it helpful as you wander on your SV journey to keep track.  in a notebook.

 

meat,  vendor, cost, times temps etc.  you can look back on this in the future as you then make notes to yourself after you are done

 

every SV you so is an Experiment.  why not keep track of the results ?

 

please report on what you do, some pics of the results  We i.e. I love Pics

 

and what you might do the next time.

 

eventually you will realize, pork does not need to be Well Done.

 

but do now what you feel like will reward both yourself and others.

 

Cold SV makes better sandwiches than you can buy at any deli

 

after all, you did the work.  and will cost you a fraction of the deli cost

 

Id recommend some of that savings be put into Methode Rotuts.

 

just saying.

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13 hours ago, Josh71 said:

The size is about 15 cm x 10 cm and the height is about 6 to 7 cm, with weight 785 grams (from the package).

 

Anyone can suggest the timing and the temperature for sous vide if I want to have "medium" for the beef and "well-done" for the pork?

At a little over 2" thick it will need a minimum of ~3hrs to reach equilibrium with the water bath. The advice of below 140°F for beef is good, and 135*F is even better if you want it really medium; that way the torch won't take you past where you want to go. It will benefit from a longer time (I often run tri-tip for 24 hr @ 133°F and it comes out both medium rare and fork tender after which I torch it for color and flavor).

 

Pork "well done" is a food safety issue.  If you trust your source then you don't need to spoil it with too much heat (assuming it is a loin).  If it is a loin then it is not very fatty and will be dry if cooked to "well done".

 

If it is a butt then it will benefit from long cooking to tenderize and because it has lots of fat, it can be roasted in a conventional oven starting at 300°F for 2 hours or until the core reaches 140°F, then 250°F for another two hours, then 230°F until the core temp reaches ~200°F or a little higher.  It can then be chunked or pulled/shredded. If you want to slice it, stop at 190-192°F.

Edited by DocDougherty (log)
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Nothing I would disagree with above. 

 

Looks like a pork loin and beef tenderloin.  I would be reluctant to SV product in butcher packaging unless it was specifically packaged for SV.  As shown it might be in a brine, pumped with water or in a bag that may rupture during cooking.

 

I like tables and apps and other "stuff" as much as anyone.  But this is what works for me day in and day out.

 

First thing I would do is repackage and seal.  Lose some of the herbs and add a T of oil.  (oil is another debate - I use it, many don't.)  Set bath temp at 145F for pork.  In the bath for 3 hours.  Ice bath and refridge.  Drop some of that ice in SV bath and cool to 135F.  Drop beef in for 3 hours.  Ice bath and refridge.  An hour-ish before serving bring SV bath to 135 and drop in both products for 30 min or so - you won't overcook.  Open bags, carve and serve.

 

There will be no blood from either product.  Beef will be med.  I would prefer pork to cook at 140F but most of my customers want it a little more than med.  Never had a send back at 145F.  Product is still moist and tender.


Good luck!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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5 hours seems low for pork loin. It wont be tender if sliced thick. If its well done it will be tough and dry. I would agree with Rotuts and not go above 135 if you dont mind some pink, if pinkis and issue, then 140 will be barely pink and most likely right at white-ish.

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Usually, I don't mind experiment on cooking as I always do. But, this time, I am in charge for the main course for our New Year party. There will be 10 adults and 7 small kids.

 

We have 3 of those beefs and 2 pork.

 

My main concern is of course food safety. Note that I bought these beef and pork from supermarket, so I don't know the source.

 

Those families might never heard of sous vide cooking, so this will be the first time to introduce it :)

 

SV is a bit new to me, I have done mainly the common things: steak, eggs, duck breast, duck legs, creme brulee, chicken legs.

 

All those are small, which I usually do in 30 to 60 minutes, following the timing / temperature chart that I found in the internet. Great result by the way.

 

So, I have never done meat that size, especially the thickness. That's why I am asking. Well, I could buy 1 set to experiment, still have time, but that would be costly.

 

Agree with daveb, I think I will re-package them also add oil (yes, I like this as well).

 

The plan, for now:

 

Beef: 135F for 5 hours

Pork: 145F for 5 hours

 

Yes, I will try to make some photos and share it here.

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So, here it is.

 

I cooked the pork at 69C (156.2F) for 4 hours 30 minutes, and the beef at 58C (136.4F) also for 4 hours 30 minutes, one day before.

 

Both were excellent, juicy and not dry.

 

But the beef was a bit "tough", probably because of the type of cut, I don't know. As you can see the meat structure, it's quite dense.

 

The difficult part was to brown it.

 

Blowtorch doesn't do much, I use standard torch "attached" to a butane gas canister. 

 

So, I browned in a very hot skillet wok with oil instead.

IMG_20151231_183357.jpg

Edited by Josh71 (log)
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Congratulations on a successful cook.  It is hard to say for sure, but the beef  looks quite lean.  Unless it was a very tender cut, you may have needed a much longer cook to tenderize it.  I am new to sous vide myself though so hopefully someone with more experience will comment. 

 

Pork seems to be very forgiving, but I might have been tempted to do a trial run with an extra beef roast - particularly if I wasn't sure about the tenderness of the cut.  Then again, I tend to go overboard.  The first time I did our thanksgiving turkey on a big green egg I think I did a trial breast, then another trial with a whole turkey, then the actual bird.  It worked out though because everyone loved it and I ended up digging out vacuum-sealed turkey from the freezer so everyone could take leftovers home.

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when you do this again, try a lower temp for the pork.  loin shines at 135 or so

 

the beef looks like eye of the round, just a guess.  its tough and Id suggest at least 24 hrs 

 

Baldwin suggests 130  1 - 2 days.  for medium rare.   try 1.5 days

 

the first time you taste 'tender' beef from a tough cut  you will understand the value of SV

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a P.S. :  make more than you need for a dinner.   get a 'beer cooler' to save wear and tear on your SV system

 

why make more ?  sliced thin SV meats make the finest sandwiches you can make

 

way beets out the deli counter at a fraction of the cost w/o all those additives

 

even the tasty additives.

 

don't for get the CornedBeef when on sale near St.Patricks day  !

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1 hour ago, rotuts said:

when you do this again, try a lower temp for the pork.  loin shines at 135 or so

 

The only problem with that is that some people are quite squeamish about pork that has more than the slightest hint of pink in it.  That may be irrational, but it is a consideration when cooking for a group (as was the case here).

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True.  But.  Reality is most folks want pork more done than what 135F will do.

 

I prepared several today, (NYE leftovers) same old 145F for 1.5 hr.  They will be rosy, tender,  and moist after a quick sear.  Plated on Salmoriglio.  Won't suck.   (I hope)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by daveb
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I love beef and lamb inbetween rare and med rare but I wont eat chicken or pork if its slightly pink. If you think thats weird, I also wont eat a tuna steak or salmon filet if its on the rare side but i love salmon and tuna sushi.

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