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Kerry Beal

Instant Pot at Work - A Little Help Please

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On 4/23/2016 at 3:46 PM, Kerry Beal said:

Another 24 hour shift - stopped in the Sobey's in Dunnville before work this am to see what I could find.

 

There were pork breast bones - very inexpensively 

 

IMG_2003.jpg

 

 

Those look pretty similar to what is sold down here as "country style ribs." Generally fairly cheap, and great in any sort of slow cook.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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13 minutes ago, kayb said:

 

Those look pretty similar to what is sold down here as "country style ribs." Generally fairly cheap, and great in any sort of slow cook.

They did look a little like country style ribs on the surface. But a whole lot more bone in there!

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Ive never seen this cut around here.  CCR's are more in the back and frequently contain some of the upper loin

 

this seems to be butterfly'd pectoral muscle where it connects to the sternum

 

and Ive never seem pork pectoral muscle, i.e. pork brisket.

 

back some time here on eG someone found it as a corned product brined in a pouch.

 

it must go into hot-dogs and the like ?

 

it would be interesting to find some, and if reasonably priced, SV it a la Beef corned beef

 

it might make an interesting sandwich !


Edited by rotuts (log)
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We used to get country style ribs around here that look like Kerry's photo around here mixed in with meatier pieces from elsewhere on the carcass. I haven't seen any in years.


> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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A quick trip to Sobey's grocery store before work this morning produced this chunk of meaty beef back rib. 

 

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Browned in IP, put on rack over around 1/2 cup of stock, pressure cooked for 20 minutes with 10 min release.

 

Browned again. 

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Not quite as good as had they been roasted in the oven - but still pretty damn good for cooked at work. 

IMG_2210.jpg

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Kerry - Are you sharing any of your IP cooked meals at work? And, if so, are people impressed with the IP and perhaps even running out to buy themselves one?

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1 hour ago, Deryn said:

Kerry - Are you sharing any of your IP cooked meals at work? And, if so, are people impressed with the IP and perhaps even running out to buy themselves one?

I come out of my little room with food sometimes - and I've dragged a few people back there to see it. Now sure if anyone has bought one yet.

 

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IMG_2414.jpg

 

Made some confit garlic scapes in the IP at work this am - picked them up at the farmers market before work this morning.

 

IMG_2415.jpg

 

Cooked up a potato in the IP on the saute mode.

 

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Fritatta with the garlic scapes, some cheese in the IP. 

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First shift back at Dunnville after my summer Manitoulin adventure. Left the house a little early so I could hit the farmers market and pick up a few things to cook.

 

IMG_2951.jpg

 

Decided I wanted green beans similar to what SobaAddict had posted recently.

 

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Sauteed onions then green beans, added tomatoes and tiny bit of liquid.

 

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3 minutes under pressure - quick realize with a towel to prevent steaming the whole room.

 

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Now to snarf it down before they drag me back out to see patients. 

 

 

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wow

 

I take it you saute'd the onion first  then added the green beans to the pot to sauté a bit.

 

Im assuming you left the onions in there w the GB's?

 

very very nice.

 

were the GB's cooked to your satisfaction ?  

 

Im always surprised GB's take more time to cook, however you cook them , than they seem to need at first glance.

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1 minute ago, rotuts said:

wow

 

I take it you saute'd the onion first  then added the green beans to the pot to sauté a bit.

 

Im assuming you left the onions in there w the GB's?

 

very very nice.

 

were the GB's cooked to your satisfaction ?  

 

Im always surprised GB's take more time to cook, however you cook them , than they seem to need at first glance.

Yup - sautéed the onions first, added green beans and sautéed a bit more. Left the onions in and added the tomatoes. The green beans were soft but with a bit of tooth left which made them quite satisfactory IMHO.

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12 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Yup - sautéed the onions first, added green beans and sautéed a bit more. Left the onions in and added the tomatoes. The green beans were soft but with a bit of tooth left which made them quite satisfactory IMHO.

 

So simple and looks delicious. I know I'll be cooking this very soon.


Edited by cta (log)

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I am being sorely tempted to buy one of these hot pots!  Do I want the Bluetooth version? 

Or is there one model that is most useful?

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21 hours ago, rotuts said:

wow

 

I take it you saute'd the onion first  then added the green beans to the pot to sauté a bit.

 

Im assuming you left the onions in there w the GB's?

 

very very nice.

 

were the GB's cooked to your satisfaction ?  

 

Im always surprised GB's take more time to cook, however you cook them , than they seem to need at first glance.

 

Yes, I agree.  But I also find that it's easy to go from underdone to overcooked in no time.

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I needed more HB eggs for potato salad so thought Id try 4 min HP, instant release   chill

 

the same eggs I usually use :  generic supermarket Large,  w pushpin hole in the air-sac. not fresh.

 

1 cut tap water    1 doz. large from the refrigerator  :

 

4 HP egg.jpg

 

these were not refrigerator cold yet still a little warm.   not as easy to peel as cold.

 

yolk fully cooked w a sl darker center      no green edge.     very nice.

 

for me  4 min HP  instant release   chill in cold water from now on.

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1 hour ago, lindag said:

I am being sorely tempted to buy one of these hot pots!  Do I want the Bluetooth version? 

Or is there one model that is most useful?

I don't feel the need of bluetooth myself - I'm generally in the room with it when I get it going and it's got the keep warm when I'm done if I've left the area.

 

I think the popular version is the Instant Pot IP-DUO60 7-in-1 Programmable Pressure Cooker, 6qt/1000W, Latest 3rd Generation Technology, Stainless Steel Cooking Pot and Exterior - at least that's the last 2 I've purchased.

 

 

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I did cave in and order the IP (latest version without Bluetooth - $119 at Amazon US). 

The next morning I woke up to no water in the house!  The pump for my well had died in the night -$1500 for a replacement!

My IP should be here tomorrow morning and will all the commotion haven't had time to decide yet what my first recipe will be.

Someone mentioned a KFC knock-off but I can't find a recipe.  Anyone?

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So today I brought along some leftover honey garlic sausage I'd cooked on the Big Green Egg. Had some chicken stock that I made in my home IP with the carcass of a rotisserie chicken (and then again with another carcass).

 

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Cooked some RG Christmas Limas in stock for 20 minutes high pressure.

 

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Sautéed a big old carrot and garlic.

 

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More stock, one beefsteak tomato. 5 minutes high pressure

 

IMG_2987.JPG

 

Added in the cut up sausage and added back the limas. 1 minute low pressure. 

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@Kerry Beal, kimchi jjigae is my husband's all-time favorite Korean dish. Could you please share your recipe and technique so I can make him very happy this winter?


MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

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Kimchi Jigae 

Ingredients

 

  •  lb. pork belly sliced very thin, or ground pork
  • ½ small onion sliced
  • 1 ½ cups loosely packed kimchi
  • 4 cloves of garlic minced
  • ½ cup kimchi juice
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 inch fresh ginger, grated or pressed
  • 1 tablespoon cooking wine (such as mirin or shaoxing)
  • 2 teaspoons gochujang (Korean chili paste)
  • 2 teaspoons miso or dengjang
  • 2 teaspoons Korean soup soy sauce (or light soy sauce)
  • 2 tablespoons gochugaru (Korean dried chili flakes) optional
  • 8 ounces silken tofu sliced into cubes
  • 2 green onions thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon butter

 

Method

 

1.Heat a small enameled cast iron pot (like a Le Creuset) until hot, then add the pork belly and onion. Allow some of the fat to render out of the pork belly, then add the kimchi and garlic and ginger. Saute until the mixture is very fragrant, then add the kimchi juice, water, cooking wine, gochujang, miso and soy sauce, stirring everything together to combine.
2.Bring to a boil and taste for spiciness. Add as much gochugaru to taste until it’s pleasantly tingly (I usually add about 2 Tbs, but this may be way to much for some people). Add the tofu, turn down the heat to a simmer and let it cook for 15-20 minutes, or until the pork and kimchi are tender.
3.When you’re ready to serve, add the green onions and butter and give it a quick stir to incorporate. Put a trivet on the table and serve it straight out of the pot along with a bowl of rice.
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