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bluesman13

Using garlic/ginger in stirfrys

10 posts in this topic

I've always wondering about this. Just abut every Chinese cookbook I own, says to heat the wok to the highest setting

available (I use an electric cooktop with a flat bottomed wok), add the oil and when it begins to smoke, add the garlic (and ginger if required).  Everytime, the garlic burns in a matter of seconds. So, I turn the heat down low enough so the garlic doesn't burn, but I was under the impression that you want a very high heat to a. sear the meat, b. cook the vegetables quickly so they remain crisp tender, and lastly, c. evaporate the water out of the added sauce to concentrate the flavor.  Any commnets or suggestions? What do you do?

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I'm sure someone who does more wok cooking will reply and give you a better answer, but this is my approach. I put oil in the pan/wok, add garlic and then heat it gently long enough that the oil is somewhat infused with the garlic. Then I remove the garlic and heat the oil for the actual stir fry. 

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There is nothing wrong with adding garlic at the end of the cooking process.

 

Many french techniques, mushrooms for example, where a really high heat sear is required (which would destroy garlic) initially, but in the last 15-20 seconds, garlic and any other aromatics may be added for additional layers of flavour.

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If it's literally a few seconds, I wonder if your wok is too hot. I'd lower the heat for that step -- and in any event, you probably wouldn't stir-fry them w/o other ingredients for more then 15-20 seconds, yes?

 

In some recipes, like this one, you add the garlic/ginger then immediately add some sauce and liquid. Sometimes you might even mix them together ahead of time, like here.

 

And yes, I'm pointing you in the direction of hzrt8w's wonderful pictorials on eG.

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14 hours ago, Alex said:

If it's literally a few seconds, I wonder if your wok is too hot. I'd lower the heat for that step -- and in any event, you probably wouldn't stir-fry them w/o other ingredients for more then 15-20 seconds, yes?

This. You don't want to dice or mince the garlic/ginger. Just mash the garlic clove/so it's broken open (use slices of ginger), stir fry that and then remove it from the oil before it burns. If it burns the second you put it in the oil/wok, then it's far too hot. Start on a lower heat to flavor the oil. Remove the garlic and/or ginger. Once that's done, crank up the heat and start the stir fry. Make sure you use a high smoke point oil (like peanut) for your stir fry..

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If your food is burning in seconds, your wok is too hot. Simple.

 

Most Chinese cooks will heat the empty wok then add oil and the garlic/ginger and briefly fry, keeping it moving all the time, then, when it smells fragrant, immediately add your meat or whatever. Again keep stirring and it shouldn't burn. If you really do think something is about to burn, add just a small splash of water - not cold oil. It will evaporate almost immediately but save your food from burning. Then turn the heat down.The idea that all wok cooking is done at full heat is a myth.

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Hi all,

 

Great to know there are so many people out there who like to stir-fry bu using a wok.

I have written a definite guide on stir-frying and is happy to contribute my understanding on this topic: 

 

The Definitive Guide To Stir-fry

 

Hope this article can provide all the questions raised in this foru,.

 

Thanks,

 

KP Kwan

 

 

 

blog - Definitive Guide To Stir Fry.png

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My name is KP Kwan. I am a pharmacist turned restaurateur who lives in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. I have worked in my restaurant more than ten years and since year 2012.

 

I am also a food blogger.  You can read my blog at http://tasteasianfood.com/

I am looking forward to learning and contributing topics about culinary skills in this forum.

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On 02/03/2016 at 3:39 PM, kwankapang said:

Hi all,

 

Great to know there are so many people out there who like to stir-fry bu using a wok.

I have written a definite guide on stir-frying and is happy to contribute my understanding on this topic: 

 

The Definitive Guide To Stir-fry

 

Hope this article can provide all the questions raised in this foru,.

 

Thanks,

 

KP Kwan

 

 

Why is everything about beef? Is that the Malaysian influence?


Edited by liuzhou (log)

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The whole idea of using a wok is control of heat.

 

The wok has many temperature zones. Push the food to where the heat is right.

 

dcarh

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