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Joule Sous Vide from ChefSteps


FauxPas
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This is the first i have heard of this new piece of equipment, but I still can't find out what makes it better than Anova. It looks very similar. Does anyone else know? It's called Joule. 

 

http://blog.chefsteps.com/tag/joule/

 

ETA  It doesn't look like it needs a clip. Does it attach to the base of the pot? 

Edited by FauxPas (log)
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I just got their email about this and checked it out briefly. Its main feature seems to be that it's tiny. Like, really, really small. Even though it's likely among the most powerful circulators people would buy for home.

 

The other big feature is that it's controlled 100% from a smart phone app. I'm not crazy about this, since I'd like to be able to glance at the thing and see the read and set temps, etc.. But if the app is well designed (or better ... if they open the APIs and people write great 3rd party apps ... that could be cool). But in general I like Anova's approach, where the main controls are on the unit and the remote app is optional.

 

The app they show on the site seems designed for beginners (like ... with video on how to prep a steak). I would like something more like SV Dash running the show.

 

Hey Anova, are you listening? Why don't you guys buy S.V. Dash? The developer hasn't done anything with it in years.

 

 

"ETA  It doesn't look like it needs a clip. Does it attach to the base of the pot?"

Yeah, it comes with 2 clips ... one for pots, one for coolers and cambros. Very nice that they went out of their way here here to accommodate both casual and hardcore users.

Edited by paulraphael (log)
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Notes from the underbelly

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I found a bit more info. It does have a magnetic mount, which won't work for all cookware of course. 

 

Read more here and scroll down to bottom for specs, cut-away diagram, etc. 

 

https://www.chefsteps.com/joule

 

Not sure I'm crazy about the exclusive smartphone control, either. But might be OK, if the app is really good. 

 

Edited to add: Posted same time as stckciv!

Edited by FauxPas (log)
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that's it

 

dis-regarding those who succumbed to the SVS

 

[ed.: CSB is cheaper, better, even Much Better  :raz: ]

 

I can't see SV as an especially expanding market.   Im pleased new circulators are being made, but its going to be very tough

 

to beet the Anova, as the market for these might be a bit static

 

however, Kudos go to those who Try.

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well   maybe there should be a new topic here :

 

how to Beet the Anova and put a SV system in every houseHold

 

an Anova in Every Pot !

 

[disclaimer : some, not all , have WiFi and RingTones ]

 

BillSonoma  and SurleTable  do not have cambro pots bubbling way in their windows

 

as far as i can tell   

 

I don't go there often, but it right across of Apple  !

 

:raz:

Edited by rotuts (log)
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"Size 11.0 x 1.85 inches
Weight 1.28 lbs (580 g)"

 

Nice!!!  :smile:

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~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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I'd be very happy with a circulator that's the size of the Joule, as simple as the Sansaire (I don't need fancy connectivity or other bells and whistles), as reliable as the Anova and a ~$99.00 price point.

I'd buy a few of them!  :cool:  

Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
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~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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At this point, every circulator is good enough that price is pretty much my only determining factor. With SV, once you reach a certain base level of functionality, it's impossible to spend more money to produce better results. 

Edited by Shalmanese (log)
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PS: I am a guy.

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Yesterday Kenji started a thread about this on Reddit SV.  It is a long and growing thread, but it contains some interesting comments.  So far the consensus seems to be that people like the size, design, and 1100 watt heating element, but quite a few are unhappy with the lack of any physical controls/readout and  the price point.  I can''t say I disagree.

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If I was not completely happy with my ANOVAs I would be very tempted. I love the look of it and the size of it but I rather doubt it could do anything more than what I already have. Back up a year or two and I would probably have jumped on it.

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well   maybe there should be a new topic here :

 

how to Beet the Anova and put a SV system in every houseHold

 

an Anova in Every Pot !

 

[disclaimer : some, not all , have WiFi and RingTones ]

 

BillSonoma  and SurleTable  do not have cambro pots bubbling way in their windows

 

as far as i can tell   

 

I don't go there often, but it right across of Apple  !

 

:raz:

You'll be able to be an annova from the apple store soon.

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I own multiple Sansaires and I just wish the footprint was the size of this new Joule. 

 

The Sansaires will look as old as video tapes in comparison to thumb drives.

 

...............still no sign of a whizz-bang chamber vac-pack, homogeniser or rotovap.

 

although Dave Arnold's 500ml 'fuge is on the way.   

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“Do you not find that bacon, sausage, egg, chips, black pudding, beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, fried bread and a cup of tea; is a meal in itself really?” Hovis Presley.

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Quickly setting the temperature with Joule....

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~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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They talk about the heat element in the Joule in this article, their alternative to the usual coil heater. They call it 'thick film'. Not sure that I really get it.  :unsure:

 

 

What’s thick film?

According to Young, they created this new heating technology by taking a stainless steel tube, silk screening on a pottery glaze, firing it in a kiln to create electrical isolation from the inside where water is and the heater, and then silk screening on a circuit board.  The circuit board then becomes a heater circuit.

  

http://www.forbes.com/sites/michaelwolf/2015/11/24/chefsteps-creates-joule-in-effort-to-push-sous-vide-cooking-to-the-masses/

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but I still can't find out what makes it better than Anova.

Size is a big thing. I'm happy with my Anova and it has changed the way I use sous vide, but I only have 1 pot that is big enough to use it with. I keep intending to get a larger cooler just for sous vide, but space (and to a lesser degree cost) is an issue. Currently, size is the reason I don't sous vide more often. The one pot I have big enough for the anova is stored in a separate cupboard out of the kitchen, so there's always that small amount of extra effort required to set it up and then pack it away afterwards.

If the Joule is small enough that I can use it with my existing pots then great. And competition is always a good thing.

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Indeed, thick film heating has been around for several years, at least.  The process sprays an electrically resistive film onto a substrate (typically mica or aluminum).  Then contacts are added; when a voltage is applied, the entire surface heats evenly due to it's even resistance. See http://www.dateccoating.com/

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