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FrogPrincesse

Mixing with Cognac

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We have a thread on mixing with cognac's country cousin, armagnac, one dedicated to a famous cognac cocktail, the Sidecar, one on everyday cognac, armagnac, brandy, etc, but no discussion on mixing with cognac. So here we go.

 

Harvard Cocktail #2 (Tony Conigliaro via Difford's) with Pierre Ferrand 1840 cognac, Byrrh, orange bitters (Regan/Angostura/Fee). Byrrrh replaces the sweet vermouth and Angostura bitters, and orange bitters sub in for the orange twist in this Harvard variation. It is grape-forward with a tinge of bitterness thanks to the Byrrh.

 

 

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My favorite cognac based beverage is Mississippi punch, Brigade-Major Thomas Unett's version (published 1850) from Imbibe!

 

2 oz PF 1840

1 oz S&C

1/2 oz Batavia-Arrack (as much as I despise their new screw cap bottles)

juice of 1 lemon

2 teaspoons sugar (note I reduce the sugar)

 

 

Before someone complains a drink is properly two ounces, blame Unett or the Mississippians not me.

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Once upon a time Martin Doudoroff and I did a series of experiments using Louis Royer Force 53 and Pierre Ferrand 1840 cognacs.  These are both "high proof" cognacs, with Force 54 coming in at 106 proof and 1840 at 90 proof.  We diluted samples of each cognac down to 80 proof, the usual strength of cognac, and prepared cocktails with each of the four base spirits.  The results were dramatic and obvious, with the higher proof cognacs consistently producing significantly better cocktails.  I've often been underwhelmed by cognac cocktails, but began to realize that this may have been due to the fact that I was using 80 proof spirits.  Nowadays, I just don't mix with anything but high proof cognacs if I'm making a cognac cocktail.

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My favorite cognac based beverage is Mississippi punch, Brigade-Major Thomas Unett's version (published 1850) from Imbibe!

 

2 oz PF 1840

1 oz S&C

1/2 oz Batavia-Arrack (as much as I despise their new screw cap bottles)

juice of 1 lemon

2 teaspoons sugar (note I reduce the sugar)

 

 

Before someone complains a drink is properly two ounces, blame Unett or the Mississippians not me.

 

Drinks novice here.  What is S&C?

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This one has a lot going on for it. Created on a simple Daiquiri template, it's a sour with depth and complexity. Very inspiring.

 

Keen-A On You (Donny Clutterbuck) with Pierre Ferrand 1840, Picon (substituted for Bigallet China China), lime juice, demerara syrup.

 

23011392842_0d2e781351_z.jpg

 

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Once upon a time Martin Doudoroff and I did a series of experiments using Louis Royer Force 53 and Pierre Ferrand 1840 cognacs.  These are both "high proof" cognacs, with Force 54 coming in at 106 proof and 1840 at 90 proof.  We diluted samples of each cognac down to 80 proof, the usual strength of cognac, and prepared cocktails with each of the four base spirits.  The results were dramatic and obvious, with the higher proof cognacs consistently producing significantly better cocktails.  I've often been underwhelmed by cognac cocktails, but began to realize that this may have been due to the fact that I was using 80 proof spirits.  Nowadays, I just don't mix with anything but high proof cognacs if I'm making a cognac cocktail.

 

If you like high proof cognacs then hopefully you were able to get a bottle of the very limited single cask Gourry de Chadeville from PM Spirits which weighed in at a modest 128.6 proof. Although admittedly it was a bit spendy for use in most cocktails at well over $100. That and it was just too darn good to drink anyway other than neat or with just a touch of water!

 

I confess I have not used it in a cocktail of any sort and probably won't. But I bet it would be really good!

 

 

Navarre Cognac Gourry De Chadeville.JPG

 

(The Navarre cognac next to it was no slouch either at 90 proof!)

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From last night, a Corpse Reviver No. 1 (Harry Craddock with the ratio from the Bartender's Choice app) with Pierre Ferrand 1840 cognac, Daron XO calvados, Martini Gran Lusso vermouth, Angostura bitters, brandied griotte cherry. The Little Red Door in Paris made me fall in love with that cocktail last year. It is perfect for fall/winter and has a great Manhattan vibe with grape & apple notes. It's nice with a slightly bitter vermouth like the Gran Lusso.

 

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Zamboanga Cocktail (Charles H. Baker Jr.):

 

1 1/2 oz Pierre Ferrand 1840

1 teaspoon Luxardo Maraschino

1 teaspoon pineapple syrup (feste's)

3 dashes Angostura

3/4 oz lime juice

 

 

Tonight I skipped the olive garnish and put some easier units to the recipe.  Rather than an olive this might be lovely with a (genuine) Maraschino cherry.

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From last week, a Vieux Carré (Walter Bergeron) with Pierre Ferrand 1840 cognac, High West Double Rye! straight rye whiskey, Martini Gran Lusso vermouth, Benedictine, Angostura bitters, Peychaud's bitters.

 

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And then, this bitter riff on a Vieux Carré, the Windsor Knot (Richard Yarnall) with High West Double Rye! straight rye whiskey, Pierre Ferrand 1840, Noilly extra dry vermouth, Cynar, Benedictine. It was supposed to be on the rocks but I did it up like a Manhattan.

 

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My reply got lost in upgrade issues, so I'll repeat: I made the Windsor Knot the other night, subbing manzanilla sherry for the dry vermouth (but otherwise working to spec). It was a very satisfying glass!

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And another Vieux Carré variation! This one omits the Benedictine and replaces it with pear liqueur, and it changes the rye & cognac combo to rum & cognac.

 

 Bâton Rouge (Julien Escot via Gaz Regan) with Pierre Ferrand 1840 cognac, Denizen Merchant's Reserve rum, Cocchi vermouth di Torino, Morand Williamine pear eau-de-vie (substituted for pear liqueur), Peychaud's and Angostura bitters.

 

Bâton Rouge (Julien Escot via Gaz Regan) with Pierre Ferrand 1840 cognac, Denizen Merchant's Reserve rum, Cocchi vermouth di Torino, Morand Williamine pear eau-de-vie, Peychaud's and Angostura bitters #cocktail #cocktails #craftcocktails #rum #cognac #101

 

 

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On ‎10‎/‎21‎/‎2016 at 7:42 PM, FrogPrincesse said:

And another Vieux Carré variation! This one omits the Benedictine and replaces it with pear liqueur, and it changes the rye & cognac combo to rum & cognac.

 

 Bâton Rouge (Julien Escot via Gaz Regan) with Pierre Ferrand 1840 cognac, Denizen Merchant's Reserve rum, Cocchi vermouth di Torino, Morand Williamine pear eau-de-vie (substituted for pear liqueur), Peychaud's and Angostura bitters.

 

Bâton Rouge (Julien Escot via Gaz Regan) with Pierre Ferrand 1840 cognac, Denizen Merchant's Reserve rum, Cocchi vermouth di Torino, Morand Williamine pear eau-de-vie, Peychaud's and Angostura bitters #cocktail #cocktails #craftcocktails #rum #cognac #101

 

 

 

Sounded a bit sweet as written but the eau de vie might help. What did you think? I would rather miss the Benedictine I think.

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17 minutes ago, tanstaafl2 said:

 

Sounded a bit sweet as written but the eau de vie might help. What did you think? I would rather miss the Benedictine I think.

It was very aromatic, not too sweet. I am sure the eau-de-vie helped!

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Bon Viveur (Chris Lowder via Food & Wine) with 2 oz Pierre Ferrand 1840 cognac, 1/2 oz St Germain, 1 barspoon Bigallet China-China, dash BDW grapefruit bitters (subbed for the grapefruit twist). A bit sweet but super pleasant with beautiful floral flavors.

 

Bon Viveur (Chris Lowder via Food & Wine) with 2 oz Pierre Ferrand 1840 cognac, 1/2 oz St Germain, 1 barspoon Bigallet China-China, dash BDW grapefruit bitters (subbed for grapefruit twist) #cocktails #cocktail #craftcocktails #cognac #stgermain

 

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I was going through Fred Yarm's list of top cocktails of 2016 and this one caught my eye. It's his adaptation of the Benediction from Pioneers of Mixing at Elite Bars.

 

Benediction (as adapted by Frederic Yarm) with Pierre Ferrand 1840 cognac, Dolin dry vermouth, Benedictine, Picon, Maraschino liqueur.

I thought for a second of using Bigallet China-China but went with Picon as was specified (although mine is Picon Biere, not Amer Picon).

The cocktail wasn't too sweet as I was fearing initially with the Picon & cognac combo. Nice harmony between the cognac and the dry vermouth, lots of grape notes, some bitter orange and body from the Picon, sweetness from the maraschino, and the Benedictine in the background tying everything together. Very successful!

 

Benediction (as adapted by Frederic Yarm) with Pierre Ferrand 1840 cognac, Dolin dry vermouth, Benedictine, Picon, Maraschino liqueur #cocktail #cocktails #craftcocktails #cognac #benedictine #picon #pioneersofmxingatelitebars #fredyarm #maraschino

 


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)
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Amer Picon has gotten to be a bit frustrating in newer cocktail recipes to me (Or I am just lazy! It might be more of the latter...). Few people are likely using Amer Picon since it isn't readily available, much less the original higher proof Amer Picon which of course hasn't been made in several decades. So are they using Picon Biere as you did or are they creating their own based on one of the several formulas floating around? And if so what is their formula? And what impact does each different formula have on the drink? I have an old bottle of Torani Amer but it was never my favorite. David Wondrich recommended a fairly simple formula using Amaro CioCiaro here on eGullet and Jamie Boudreaux suggests Ramazzotti in a somewhat more complex formula found on various websites including Kindred Cocktails.

 

I haven't made Picon in a while (usually if I do I make the Wondrich/Splificator formula) and tend to just gloss over cocktails requiring Picon with the possible exception of the Brooklyn. But I usually get lazy again and just use Amaro CioCiaro, which for me at least is readily available, and an extra splash or two of Angostura orange bitters.

 

Ah well, sounds like the drink was a good one either way!

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Just now, tanstaafl2 said:

Amer Picon has gotten to be a bit frustrating in newer cocktail recipes to me (Or I am just lazy! It might be more of the latter...). Few people are likely using Amer Picon since it isn't readily available, much less the original higher proof Amer Picon which of course hasn't been made in several decades. So are they using Picon Biere as you did or are they creating their own based on one of the several formulas floating around? And if so what is their formula? And what impact does each different formula have on the drink? I have an old bottle of Torani Amer but it was never my favorite. David Wondrich recommended a fairly simple formula using Amaro CioCiaro here on eGullet and Jamie Boudreaux suggests Ramazzotti in a somewhat more complex formula found on various websites including Kindred Cocktails.

 

I haven't made Picon in a while (usually if I do I make the Wondrich/Splificator formula) and tend to just gloss over cocktails requiring Picon with the possible exception of the Brooklyn. But I usually get lazy again and just use Amaro CioCiaro, which for me at least is readily available, and an extra splash or two of Angostura orange bitters.

 

Ah well, sounds like the drink was a good one either way!

I do like Amaro CioCiaro a lot, but I feel it's quite different from Picon (lighter, less body, less "caramelized" flavors). I prefer Bigallet China-China as a substitute (or to Picon Biere itself to be perfectly honest), and it's delicious in Brooklyns.

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13 minutes ago, FrogPrincesse said:

I do like Amaro CioCiaro a lot, but I feel it's quite different from Picon (lighter, less body, less "caramelized" flavors). I prefer Bigallet China-China as a substitute (or to Picon Biere itself to be perfectly honest), and it's delicious in Brooklyns.

 

Hmm, I recently got the Bigallet but haven't gotten around to trying it. I will have to do some comparison tasting! For science, of course.

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Just now, tanstaafl2 said:

 

Hmm, I recently got the Bigallet but haven't gotten around to trying it. I will have to do some comparison tasting! For science, of course.

It's really good. I don't think you'll be disappointed!

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