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Cuisinart Combo Steam/Convection Oven (Part 2)


blue_dolphin
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1 minute ago, Okanagancook said:

I checked again this morning and it said it was picked up in Vancouver so it didn't get to Penticton in time for them to drive it out here.  OR Kerry Beal has MY Instapot, ha.>:(

Hmmm.   If she does it is in Burlington not here.:D

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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4 hours ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

 

I had found quarter sheet pan size Silpats.  In my opinion they are a poor match to the size pan in the CSO.  The best I found was an octagonal Silpat designed for a microwave turntable, but even that was not worth it for me.

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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7 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

 

I tried this with the husk-on.  The husk did slip off easily as with the microwave method but the corn was still quite raw.  It had been in the fridge and after 12 minutes of steam at 140 deg, it was still less than room temp.  I chalked it up to the cold start and leaving the husk on but I had to pop in in the MW for a couple of minutes.  Maybe super steam would work better for me?   Or the handy old MW :D!

 

I am sorry.  I would not expect 12 minutes to be long enough with the husk on.  A couple other convection steam oven manufacturers have guides on the web that suggest 210 deg F. steam at about 25 minutes for corn on the cob.  But this would result in a different texture from what @nathanm described in his post.

 

Try super steam with husk on and report back!

 

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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3 hours ago, rotuts said:

Hot ? Humid ?  etc ?

 

don't forget both the CSB  and the IP are light, portable, and work well outside

 

in the shade

 

 

money-mouth.gif

 

Outside at the moment I should hardly need a steam oven.

 

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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16 minutes ago, lindag said:

I plan to roast my first whole chicken in my brand new CSO tomorrow.  Any suggestions or recipes to recommend would be greatly appreciated!

I want to do one soon, too, so I will await all advice.

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8 hours ago, lindag said:

I plan to roast my first whole chicken in my brand new CSO tomorrow.  Any suggestions or recipes to recommend would be greatly appreciated!

As the heating bars are quite close to the top of the chicken, i've read that starting the chicken on its breast for about 1/3 of its cooking time prevents the breast from becoming overdone/burnt.

Haven't tried this myself, but it sounds like an idea, what do others think?

 

p

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20 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

My solution was to split the chicken.  That or use a goose.

 

I've done that but then I had problems with width, so I used the Breville. Not tried a goose.

 

p

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14 hours ago, Okanagancook said:

Roast chicken, whole on p 19 in the manual. I believe that was the first thing I did in my oven.  Says for a 4 pound chicken.  A starting point.

Thanks, that's just what I'll do - it sounds pretty good!

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As I mentioned earlier, I've put my BSO into storage to replace it with my ne Cuisinart Steam Oven.  I am puzzled about a couple of things with the CSO though:. Why, since it contains water, does it no have a three prong plug?

why is there no 'bage' setting to only toast tops?  I've used this feature several times with my BSO although I wouldn't say it's necessarily essential.

 

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30 minutes ago, lindag said:

As I mentioned earlier, I've put my BSO into storage to replace it with my ne Cuisinart Steam Oven.  I am puzzled about a couple of things with the CSO though:. Why, since it contains water, does it no have a three prong plug?

why is there no 'bage' setting to only toast tops?  I've used this feature several times with my BSO although I wouldn't say it's necessarily essential.

 

Can't answer your question re the plug but I just use the broil function to grill the top side of a bun or an English muffin. 

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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23 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Can't answer your question re the plug but I just use the broil function to grill the top side of a bun or an English muffin. 

 

Of course!  I never thought of that!

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Another vote for the roast chicken in the manual/cookbook, which I've made a few times. I cooked it at a slightly lower temp for a bit longer and just used some tinfoil to cover it when it appeared to be browning a bit too fast. And I lined the pan with tin foil as well. 

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I'm a bit confused about how the Cusinart preheats.  I expected it to start heating and then chirp when the set temperatures is achieved.  It doesn't seem to do this.  Can someone explain, please?

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Ive never heard a chirp.

 

Ive never preheated.  not so say that that's the best way to use the CSB.  theses small ovens get to temp very quickly.

 

Ive found w steam everything cooks much faster.  I thermapen meats.  I use a lower temp than Id use in a Dry oven for meats

 

this is a bit of SV thinking.   and when the meat is almost done, I either do a steam-broil for the browing of the top, or more often

 

a careful torching out of the oven.

 

if someone does the whole chicken again, in their usual fashion , Id be interested in the termapen'd  temps of the white and dark meat

 

when you take the Bird out of the oven.

 

if you have not tried chicken or turkey thighs in the CSB, please consider this.  skin on, w or w/o the bone.

 

you will be very impressed I think.

 

of course, you have to like Dark Meat.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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rotuts,  Of course I l-o-v-e dark meat ckn. 

the whole chicken I cooked yesterday turned out very nicely; very tasty and nicely browned.

I tried steam/bake for 50 mins. at 425º to start out and then added another five minutes when that time was done - using the recipe in the CSO manual.  Then rested it for about 10 mins.  Chicken was slightly overdone but still delicious!  Also my chicken was a bit large, 4.3 lbs. but it fit nicely inside.

Worth raving about.  And the cleanup wasn't too bad.  I'm really liking my new CSO.

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Glad the chicken worked out.  I now just start checking the meat temperature 15 minutes before the recommended time is up.  So much depends on the size of the chicken.  Allow the temp to rise during rest and you will a nice succulent chicken.  That steam really does magical things. cheers,

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I have had my CSO all of three hours. And it has already tried to kill me. 

 

In anticipation of its arrival today, I cleared off the top of the microwave to make a spot, into which it fit perfectly. I read through the manual. Well, I think I read through the manual, though I had to go back and look up how to set the clock. And I perused recipes.

 

Also in anticipation of its arrival, I started a loaf of bread last night, along with the poolish for some baguettes and ciabatta tomorrow. 

 

First, I learned something. I learned when they say don't leave water in the reservoir when you're not using the steam function, they ain't kiddin'. I discovered this when I had to mop up about half a reservoir-full.

 

Not to be deterred, I went on about shaping my loaves and putting them in the CSO on steam at 100F to proof. My 8 1/2 x 4 1/2 pans fit perfectly, side by side, btw. And I went away and left it to steam for 20 minutes.

 

At the end of which time, I stepped away from the stove, where I'd been canning tomato sauce, into a puddle of water (another half-a-reservoir-full or so...and down I went. Fortunately, I did not damage either the healing ankle nor the previously damaged knee, though the good one now has a "tweak" in it it didn't have before.

 

I mopped up THAT water, read the directions again, put a little more water in the reservoir, and made sure it was seated well this time. I think that may have been my problem. However, when they suggest a loaf of bread will proof in 20 minutes on steam at 100 degrees, they're talking through their collective hat.

 

I'm now steaming again, and drinking a glass of wine. Back  yard tomatoes yielded three half-pints of sauce. 

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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