Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

OBH Nordica Sous Vide Cooker Pro 15l


EsaK
 Share

Recommended Posts

I've been thinking and thinking more whether I should get a waterbath setup of some sort for a while now. I ran into this OBH Nordica model, and not having any experience with these things I'm asking for help. Has anyone used this or know whether this is in anyway a good, durable machine? Seems like it has a lot of power, which made me think whether it'd be worth getting versus for example an Anova. I could get this OBH model for less than 400EUR, so it'd be more than Anova.

On a more general note, and this has been discussed in many places already, but how do people see SV setups without any vacuum sealers? In other words, using basically just ziploc bags and canning jars. Does it limit the usage a lot if you don't have vacuum sealer and associated bags? Many thanks for all the help and comments.

https://www.obhnordica.com/products/kitchen/vacuum-sealers-sous-vide/sous-vide-cooker-pro-15l

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My main reaction is that this looks like a good machine if you're going to leave it on the counter full time, but not so good if you're going to want to put it away between uses.  Also, a conventional circulator can be used with a wide variety of containers, where here you're limited to the one built in.

 

Can't address the zip-top bag question.  That's how I worked for years, but with a noncirculating Sous Vide Supreme.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's no advantage of this model over cheaper circulators. Wattage and power doesn't really matter except in terms of how long it takes for the water to come up to temperature (and also recovery time). But these aren't reasons to pay double the price of its competitors. It's also worth noting that other circulators have a higher capacity (20+ liters) and you can use whatever container you'd like. The model you're considering is fixed at 15L and it'll be sitting on your countertop taking up space whether you're using it or not.

 

95% of what you'd want to do with an immersion circulator can be achieved without a vacuum machine. But if you're going to have a circulator, you'll probably end up buying an inexpensive edge-style vacuum sealer at some point. The main advantage of vacuum sealers is that you can cook, chill, and then store food cooked low temperature. They're also nicer for extended cook times like a 72 hour cook because the bags and seals are more robust than on normal Ziplock bags. But they're not really necessary. You can do longer cooks in Ziplocks and be fine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know a thing about this particular unit, so it may be an exception to the general trend, but I've had mediocre to unsatisfactory performance from every OBH appliance (kitchen and other) that I've used, and there have been quite a few because the local kitchen shops (e.g. Imerco, Inspiration) feature this brand heavily. Have you come across any reviews of this online?

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great responses, thanks all! I realized the disadvantage of having a bulky machine like this instead of a more movable circulator. Just began wondering if there's something special about this since it's +600EUR versus much less for for example SV Supreme Demi. And no, I haven't really been able to find any reviews.

I'd be able to get this OBH for 300-350EUR, but probably will just wait for a time when I can get an Anova shipped to Finland for a reasonable price.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Terve! I'd rather go with the Anova. Actually I can't think of any reason why you'd buy a fixed system rather than an immersion circulator. The only downside with Anova is that at least in the version I have, the temperature control is at 0,5 celsius intervalls.

 

Considering the issue with vacuum sealer vs. ziploc bags. If you're not cooking commercially or just have a ton of money to spend, a vacuum sealer is not necessary. Sure it's handy, but not necessary unless used for texture modification. You will be able to get a good enough "seal" with water and a ziploc bag.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Moi Ville! For me having 0.5°C control is fine enough. May I ask where did you purchase your circulator (shipped to Finland)? And do you use ziploc bags or a vacuum sealer? If ziplocs, would you mind sharing which ones you use as I've been trying to figure out which ones would work well from the ones we have in our stores. Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

its a bit difficult to find what 0.5 ( delta ) C is to F

 

its about  0.9 F as far as I can tell   so 1 degree F

 

unless you are ultra fussy with the Yolk of your SV egg, it just to the 'perfect' custard consistency 

 

1 degree F is all you really need.

 

even for delicate fish like 'just right salmon'

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I got mine for about 100€ in total since I was among the first ones to back it up on Kickstarter. Still worth it even with double the prize. Ikea bags are good enough although I'd recommend using two of those just in case, because I've had them break from a corner while in water.

 

That's true about Anova's intervals being good enough for pretty much anything else than getting super fussy with eggs. Just wanted to make a point not having the best control possible.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

If ziplocs, would you mind sharing which ones you use as I've been trying to figure out which ones would work well from the ones we have in our stores. Thanks!

 

I use the ziploc freezer bags, with the standard closure (not with the separate plastic zip thing). I've found these to be 100% reliable if handled carefully. I've used them up to an hour at 85°C, and 48 hours at lower temperatures.

 

These bags have a good track record (they're what Dave Arnold and Nils Sorensen recommend at CookingIssues). If you use them at higher temperatures, handle them gently; the plastic gets soft and the seal will be less strong.

 

I use these bags routinely for cook-chill, and cook-freeze.

 

The biggest caveat is not sous-vide specific: if you freeze liquids in these (I use them for stock) they often leak when you thaw them. So I never thaw bags full of frozen liquid in a water bath, without double-bagging. Usually I'll just put in a bowl and microwave.

 

I often reuse these as sous-vide bags, but not for anything critical. The chicken thighs I buy for s-v come vacuum-packed ... i just slip the whole package into one my recycled ziplocs and evacuate the air. In this case the ziploc is just for backup. The commercial vacuum packaging is designed to be easy to open, and it can sometimes be too easy. It's not 100% reliable in the water bath.

  • Like 1

Notes from the underbelly

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...