Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Possibly a Juicier Burger?


Paul Bacino
 Share

Recommended Posts

So I was having company for the opening Football season.  One of the local food store had Hamburger  patties on sale.  So,  I opted to use them 85/15 chuck.

 

They were only probably 3/4 " thick.  When I got them home.. that seemed like a wimpy thickness.

 

So ,  Idea    Lets fuse 2 patties using Activa -RM--  so I treated one side ( dusted like a chicken breast ) - put together, and place them in frig for about 2 hrs.. to meld

 

Took them out about 45 min prior to cook.

 

Then off to my flat top to cook..  usually these thick burgers   1 1/2 icnches, get a big blood bubble in the middle, even if you dent them prior to cooking.  What I notice with the Activa-Rm barrier in the middle , this really didn't happen.  thick the meat juice collected just under, that in-side half.  So i flipped and cooked side two.  Really was amazed how uniform they cook and how the juices real stayed inside.  No pictures as the game was on. 

 

Just thought I would share.

 

PB

  • Like 3

Its good to have Morels

Link to comment
Share on other sites

""   a big blood bubble in the middle,  ""

 

interesting.  was the meat previously frozen ?

No.. RT  ----Not frozen

 

 

in my experience .. the meat contracts.  on the outside.. first.. which in turn..  pushes the juice up in the middle up.. causing the Bubble effect.

 

Its probably not blood, but juice of fats and all

  • Like 1

Its good to have Morels

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I get that bubble in the middle all the time but I will refuse to ever call it a "blood bubble."  Just sayin.

Is that not why a lot of people recommend that you put a dimple in the center of the burgers to counteract the bubble?

  • Like 1

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is that not why a lot of people recommend that you put a dimple in the center of the burgers to counteract the bubble?

 

Yep..

 

But this doesn't happen.." the juice stops ..half way   ..or that appears to me.

 

I usually cook longer on side one..  rather than the constant flipping.

 

That way I get a nice crust developed

  • Like 1

Its good to have Morels

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am with rotuts. If you can't have fun in the kitchen where can you have fun? Well at my age anyway. Somebody had already carefully preformed these burgers and gluing two of them together strikes me as a brilliant idea. Simplicity isn't always all it's cracked up to be!

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am still trying to comprehend why you used activa to glue ground meat together? Why didn't you just combine the raw ground meat and reshape the patties?

 

 

Now like rotuts said..   That would not be fun..  and  why would I reform those perfect patties.. it would only compress the meat more.  :blink:

 

Then it wouldn't be an experiment either.

 

(  A little side bar--  my wife said it caused her heart burn.. and would never eat them again )

 

I noticed nothing-- taste differance or ill effects

  • Like 1

Its good to have Morels

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now like rotuts said..   That would not be fun..  and  why would I reform those perfect patties.. it would only compress the meat more.  :blink:

 

Then it wouldn't be an experiment either.

 

(  A little side bar--  my wife said it caused her heart burn.. and would never eat them again )

 

I noticed nothing-- taste differance or ill effects

I can understand not mixing the ground meat too much but i would have just fried/grilled them seperate and added two of the patties to the buns. More maillard/browned/char = more flavor. So instead of only two surfaces you would have had 4 surfaces.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm surprised activa isn't giving you sausage textures.

 

Juicy burgers are easy if you trust the meat and cook it medium-rare. If you have to cook more, it's traditional to compensate by adding more fat. It's surprising how hard it is to even get 20% fat with the cuts that are easily available these days. I'm guessing most of us are making 85/15 burgers. Weedy's 70/30 may go far for some people's tastes. A little butter or marrow added to the grind also works fine.

Edited by paulraphael (log)
  • Like 1

Notes from the underbelly

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I actually usually use a LaFrieda blend that's about 80/20,

that plus sous vide = "juicy" 100% of the time

We've been playing around trying to get the perfect burger cooking it SV and then doing a quick sear on the outside at the end. We've yet to come up with the perfect combination however. What time and temperature combination are you using? Are you doing a sear, if so are you doing it prior to or after the SV cook? We are also using a approximate 80/20 blend (just a guess because we are fresh grinding it ourselves).

I've learned that artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

all is true

 

as long as non of that.. juice doesn't push out ( break out ) of the sear

 

I really didn't notice..  much extrusion in these..

 

Like all the .. juice was pushed under the umbrella of the Activa ( middle ).. and kept inside

 

But.. I could have been doing some pre-game quaffing  and  just missed it

 

 

My standard cook is side one .. more than side 2.  and as the blood juice.. begin to perk through after the flip..  ill start the finger touch..  usually when the juice begins showing up a 1/3 of the way in from the edge.  its close to medium..  "  I didnt see that with these

 

Cheers  Doc

Its good to have Morels

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We've been playing around trying to get the perfect burger cooking it SV and then doing a quick sear on the outside at the end. We've yet to come up with the perfect combination however. What time and temperature combination are you using? Are you doing a sear, if so are you doing it prior to or after the SV cook? We are also using a approximate 80/20 blend (just a guess because we are fresh grinding it ourselves).

In my experiences with SV burgers, the perfect burger is first seasoned before being shaped. After shaped it is flash freezed, seared, then gently bagged and set to 140F for 1-2 hours and seared again before served on a bun with toppings of your choice. I use a blowtorch to sear to give it that "flame broiled" flavor. There is very little moisture loss even with 75/25. I prefer 80/20 because its more cost effective then other ratio's.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We've been playing around trying to get the perfect burger cooking it SV and then doing a quick sear on the outside at the end. We've yet to come up with the perfect combination however. What time and temperature combination are you using? Are you doing a sear, if so are you doing it prior to or after the SV cook? We are also using a approximate 80/20 blend (just a guess because we are fresh grinding it ourselves).

 

I do 132F for 60 mins (if not frozen), then sear in cast iron plus torch

 

"juicy" by MY reckoning

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...