Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Stuck valve in samovar - WD40 or what?


Hassouni
 Share

Recommended Posts

I tried to use my electric samovar for the first time in a while, only to discover the valve that sticks in the spigot to be completely stuck in place, held apparently by limescale. I've applied several spritzes of WD40 but it refuses to budge. What else can I do?

image.jpg

Edited by Hassouni (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looking at the photo of the samovar, I can't see what the gear puller's screw would push against.

 

I think I'd put a torch on the thing and have the thermal expansion crack the scale.

Edited by gfweb (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree - I can't see what the pulley puller would push against either.... a torch is an interesting idea too, but I didn't know what material the samovar was made from - if it's something that conducts heat well, then both parts will expand at equal rates, and may not help... but I think it's worth a shot.

Edit, the torch may not be a good idea, or you'd need to be really careful, if there are any rubber gaskets in the valve. But if it's metal on metal, it should be ok.

Edited by KennethT (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's much smaller than that, assuming the gear puller is the size of the one shown in the video

 

Gear pullers come in infinite sizes, from tiny clock maker's to big ones to pull wheels for tire replacement.

 

If all fail, drill a hole from the bottom and punch it out from the other end. Seal the hole with one drop of silicone caulk.

 

Do not use heat. It may turn whatever is getting it stuck into solid carbon and you will ruin it forever.

 

dcarch

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Chemical vs mechanical, I'd vote for chemical first as there is less chance of damaging things, mechanical on the other hand either works or you go shopping for a new one

p

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Chemical vs mechanical, I'd vote for chemical first as there is less chance of damaging things, mechanical on the other hand either works or you go shopping for a new one

p

 

Chances for that to work is not great. The design and machining of the valve assembly is to have 100% metal to metal contact to prevent leakage. Chemicals cannot easily get in to dissolve whatever is stuck in between.

 

If you want to try lubricants, WD-40 is not the one. Too high viscosity. There is a solution called Liquid Wrench, which is a penetrating thin oil what mechanics use.

 

dcarch

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...