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rlibkind

Barnsley Chop

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Enjoyed this Barnsley Chop (after cooking) for my Sunday dinner, along with grilled tomato and pan-fried potatoes. I cooked it medium (still tinges of pink). Incredibly lamb-y thanks to that gorgeous rim of delicious fat.

You won't find this cut in any supermarket I know, but a good butcher who handles lamb can do it. It's just two loin chops from opposite sides of the saddle.

This one I obtained from Nick Macri, proprietor of La Divisa Meats at Philadelphia's Readjng Terminal Market, who took over the stall from Craig Rogers of Border Springs Lamb Farm, Patrick Springs, VA, who supplies Nick (who also sells some great pork and is a master of charcuterie).

The Barnsley Chop is quintessentially English and originated, or so legend has it, in the town of the same name in South Yorkshire.

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Bob Libkind aka "rlibkind"

Robert's Market Report

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Great cut of meat, probably my favourite way to eat lamb.

 

This spring/summer I've been having mine with cannellini beans (spiked with with rosemary, garlic and a little chilli) and some swiss chard with lemon juice. 

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Over here all Turkish supermarkets carry this cut. It is delicious ...

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What's the advantage of cutting it this way? Do you sear on all 4 sides or just two?

Personally, my favorite way to eat saddle is deboned and rolled. It's a cut you can't find in the US unless you specifically order a whole saddle but it's a wonderful presentation and maximizes the amount of crispy saddle fat.


PS: I am a guy.

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I did start it by briefly searing the fat cap side, but mostly pan cooked on the two broad sides.

I don't know about any "advantage" to this cut, though I think the bigger cut is less likely to overlook/dry out that two separate loin chops.

A whole deboned saddle as you described (roasted, I presume) certainly would be tasty.

Of course, I'm rather indiscriminate when it comes to lamb. I'll pretty much eat any cut cooked in just about any way. Shanks, breast, leg, neck, shoulder. I do draw the line at most offal, except when it's disguised by a master of charcuterie.


Bob Libkind aka "rlibkind"

Robert's Market Report

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