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Instant Pot. Multi-function cooker (Part 1)


Anna N
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I would get another Zo.  Sometimes I have it going at the same time as the pressure cooker.  I do big batches of rice and freeze them in serving size packets.

I have the Induction rice cooker NP-HBC18, the 10 cup cooker. 

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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does the Insta-Pot cook rice under pressure or just simmering water, like older fuzzy rice cookers ?

 

some time ago there were induction pressure rice cookers in Japan probably made by Zo.

 

they were priced over 1,000 USD and only available in Japan.

 

i guess the Japanese are fussy when it comes to rice, and as effete as anyone else giving something expensive.

 

$ 1,000 is still a bit cheaper than my Ferrari, which I only use to drive to Tj's  

 

this one :

 

http://assets.passionperformance.ca/photos/6/4/64120_2015_ferrari_LaFerrari.jpg?460x287

 

note: F's have to have 12 cylinders.  not 8.

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The Instant Pot cooks rice (if you use the rice setting - but you could also just steam it or boil it in the Instant Pot if you prefer) under 'low pressure' - which is in the 7 something range as opposed to high which is over 15.

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the IP's don't seem to go to as high a pressure as the stove models.  Ive seen it written that you add 20 % time to Rx for stove top 15 psi models :

 

IP.jpg

 

Im not trying to be picky, I mention this as ive found it odd :  is the pressure a bit lower on these for some sort of safety reason ?

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the IP's don't seem to go to as high a pressure as the stove models.  Ive seen it written that you add 20 % time to Rx for stove top 15 psi models :

 

attachicon.gifIP.jpg

 

Im not trying to be picky, I mention this as ive found it odd :  is the pressure a bit lower on these for some sort of safety reason ?

Yes. At least that is my understanding. In order to make them safe at 15 psi it would require that they be priced out of the market. I can't recall the source for this but I do know I did not make it up.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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My apologies - I didn't give you the Instant Pot answer for the pressures the pot reaches (I just did that off the top of my head and I was wrong!)

These are the correct #s: Instant Pot IP-DUO has dual pressure settings: High 10.2 ~ 11.6psi (70 ~ 80kPa); Low 5.8 ~7.2 psi (40 ~ 50kpa)

While these lower than stove top pressure cooking pressures may indeed require that one cooks foods a bit longer, I have not found that total cooking time was terrifically long at all. It seems to me that the pot comes to pressure much faster than my stovetop cooker does - probably because it hasn't as far to go - and if that is so, perhaps total time is almost equivalent.

Edited by Deryn (log)
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In order to make them safe at 15 psi it would require that they be priced out of the market. I can't recall the source for this but I do know I did not make it up.

 

As per the hip pressure cooking website:

A representative of an electric pressure cooker manufacturer shared that the quantity and quality of materials needed to reinforce electric pressure cookers to safely contain higher pressures during the entire cooking cycle would raise the cost of production to the point of doubling or tripling the retail price compared to current models ($100-$150 as of the writing of this article).

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So we finish the eighteenth and he's gonna stiff me. And I say, "Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort, you know." And he says, "Oh, uh, there won't be any money. But when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness."

So I got that goin' for me, which is nice.

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No, not at all, rotuts. The first time I released the pressure I used a silicone pad just in case but the vent is plastic and has a stem on it that you touch - and it is somewhat moveable so you can point it well away from your fingers. I don't bother to use a pad now and have had no problem at all - no burns.

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As per the hip pressure cooking website:

Yes I believe that was the source. Thank you.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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No, not at all, rotuts. The first time I released the pressure I used a silicone pad just in case but the vent is plastic and has a stem on it that you touch - and it is somewhat moveable so you can point it well away from your fingers. I don't bother to use a pad now and have had no problem at all - no burns.

Mine has a little "ear" on the knob on the far side from the vent so it is easy to flip it to either one side or the other to allow the steam to escape.  As long as there is nothing close above it - DO NOT place it on a counter under a cabinet that contains dry stuff in boxes - or glassware or ?? that might be affected by condensing water vapor.

I have seen the effects of sugar in a box, turning into a thick syrup and leaking out of the box.  The poor lady had to toss a lot of stuff.  I helped with the cleanup.

 

HPIM7808.JPG

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Thanks, Andie. The Instant Pot vent looks very similar. Didn't know what word to use so I used 'stem' but 'ear' would probably have been better - and in this case, a picture IS the solution to the description.

Edited by Deryn (log)
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Put my order in. This has been on my radar for about a year. I'll post after amazon gets it to me.

 

I have always had a good healthy fear of pressure cookers, not rational, apple sauce horror story my Mom liked to tell of a friend of a friend of a friend, that it happened to ;) Poor thing's face was scarred for life...or so the story goes :)

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Put my order in. This has been on my radar for about a year. I'll post after amazon gets it to me.

 

I have always had a good healthy fear of pressure cookers, not rational, apple sauce horror story my Mom liked to tell of a friend of a friend of a friend, that it happened to ;) Poor thing's face was scarred for life...or so the story goes :)

In the '60s I had one explode - the lid cracked in half - one piece imbedded in the wall on the opposite side of the room and the other half went through the ceiling into the attic and took a chunk out of a rafter.  I was pressure cooking  turkey necks and backs in a 31 quart BIG pressure canner and apparently there was stuff that bubbled up and blocked the vent.. I was in another part of the house when it happened.  The entire kitchen and part of the dining room was "decorated" with glutinous turkey glop.  I hired a cleaning crew to take care of it.  It was my fault, I filled it just that little bit too full - so I wouldn't have to do a second batch.  Learned my lesson.  FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS.

 

I was very experienced with canners/pressure cookers, had done this many times before (cooking food for Great Danes) and I did it after that - got a bigger canner - which now I can't even lift when its empty. 

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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If you want to do 15psi, all day, every day, go All-American.  http://www.allamericancooker.com/allamericanpressurecooker.htm

That's what I have - the big 41-qt that I used for canning big batches of quart jars.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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As you already have a stove top pc, it makes the decision a little harder. I bought the Duo 60 as I felt you can always put a little less in a large pot, but you can never put more in a small pot. However my main concern was safety and convenience. As Andie has recounted her horror stories and my own childhood memories of parents fear of the utensil, I decided though perfectly safe when operated by a knowledgeable user, sometimes I don't fit that bill. Additionally the convenience of "set and forget" appealed to me in terms of "just getting the job done!"

Just an aside, Anna you mentioned you have an induction cooktop, is it a cooktop (more than 1 burner) or a portable burner as I've seen in your Manitoulin blogs?

p

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As you already have a stove top pc, it makes the decision a little harder. I bought the Duo 60 as I felt you can always put a little less in a large pot, but you can never put more in a small pot. However my main concern was safety and convenience. As Andie has recounted her horror stories and my own childhood memories of parents fear of the utensil, I decided though perfectly safe when operated by a knowledgeable user, sometimes I don't fit that bill. Additionally the convenience of "set and forget" appealed to me in terms of "just getting the job done!"

Just an aside, Anna you mentioned you have an induction cooktop, is it a cooktop (more than 1 burner) or a portable burner as I've seen in your Manitoulin blogs?

p

I have an induction range at home.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I never heard of this before. Of course since I read it here, I had to get one.   I am seriously impressed. Loving it.  One stovetop pressure cooker and 3 different sized slow cookers just got put into the 'donate to charity' box.  Get one.  Now.  First time,sauteed chicken,changed to pressure cooker mode,,addded veggies and seasonings. Pressure cooked for 15min , opened, added a bit more liquid  and noodles, simmered with lid off for a few min. I was done in less than 30 minutes with one really great chicken stew. One pot. And the saute setting is plenty hot enough to get the job done.   I am very happy.

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I never heard of this before. Of course since I read it here, I had to get one. I am seriously impressed. Loving it. One stovetop pressure cooker and 3 different sized slow cookers just got put into the 'donate to charity' box. Get one. Now. First time,sauteed chicken,changed to pressure cooker mode,,addded veggies and seasonings. Pressure cooked for 15min , opened, added a bit more liquid and noodles, simmered with lid off for a few min. I was done in less than 30 minutes with one really great chicken stew. One pot. And the saute setting is plenty hot enough to get the job done. I am very happy.

Ouch! Waiting for my stove top PC to come up pressure while chomping on the bit to go downstairs and deal with my laundry! But I do love being a bad influence! Which one did you get?

Edited to remove superfluous word

Edited by Anna N (log)

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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KitchenQueen

 

Im very interested in what you've done here. May I ask for a bit more info ?

 

you sautéed the Ck in the pot itself ? for color ?

 

you then added some veg, then did the PC for 15 min at pressure  ( max for the item ?)

 

then did a release saw that more liquid was needed, added that then dry noodles ? or softer i.e. refrigerated ones ?

 

did a brief simmer.  were you done then or did you seal up and do more PC

 

sorry I am not trying to picky, but would like to see exactly what you did

 

im keen on this over my favor as it might be less fiddle for me as im still a bit uneasy on the traditional Pc

 

and i do know that's just me.

 

I do respect the many here that just do traditional PC with few worries and expertise.

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KitchenQueen

 

Im very interested in what you've done here. May I ask for a bit more info ?

 

you sautéed the Ck in the pot itself ? for color ?  Yes.

 

you then added some veg, then did the PC for 15 min at pressure  ( max for the item ?)  No, I just chose that  time, it was perfect. And I used medium pressure,not high.

 

then did a release saw that more liquid was needed, added that then dry noodles ? or softer i.e. refrigerated ones ? Added some liquid and dry noodles

 

did a brief simmer.  were you done then or did you seal up and do more PC             No, I was done.

 

sorry I am not trying to picky, but would like to see exactly what you did

 

im keen on this over my favor as it might be less fiddle for me as im still a bit uneasy on the traditional Pc

 

and i do know that's just me.

 

I do respect the many here that just do traditional PC with few worries and expertise.

 

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Ouch! Waiting for my stove top PC to come up pressure while chomping on the bit to go downstairs and deal with my laundry! But I do love being a bad influence! Which one did you get?

Edited to remove superfluous word

60?   the highest  model without  the Smart  technology.. This thing comes up to pressure in no time.  But it  doesn't  need us to stand and wait. Set it, go play.

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