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eG Foodblog: Shelby--The Everlasting Garden...Canning...Canning...Canning...


Shelby
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Tomato Juice
 

 

  • 8 quarts tomatoes, 13 lbs
  • 1 head celery leaves and all
  • 2 onions
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • pepper
  • paprika
  • 2 drops tabasco sauce (I suspect you might want to add a little more than this!)

 

 

Fill 8 quart pot with washed, chopped tomatoes. Add remaining ingredients and cook until soupy. Process through fine plate on food mill. Heat again until just under boiling, place in quart bottles with 4 tsp lemon juice in each. Process in boiling water bath for 35 minutes. Makes around 7 quarts.

 

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Oh, your pictures just make me cry.  For the first time in gardening career, I have had an almost complete failure.  I hurt my back getting the garden started, so I couldn't weed and mulch, and then we had more rain than I have ever seen here.  Fungus took peppers first, and then the tomatoes.  The few tomatoes I did get were eaten up by stinkbugs.  I actually bought some tomatoes the other day--the first tomatoes I have purchased in 15 years.

 

On a positive note, I did pick a peck of purple podded pole beans last night, and that was just a quarter of the row.  But they are just not the same on a sandwich.

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sparrowgrass
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I just will have to make that sauce.  Period.

 

Oh yeah, I have about 30 quarts of tomatoes already put up.  And six quarts of juice.

 

I'm probably going to make you guys leave me forever, but I don't add any acid or lemon juice to my canned tomatoes.  Haven't ever and I've canned for twenty years.  Never ever had a problem.  A google showed me that in 1994 the experts changed and started to recommend adding acid.  I didn't learn that way, and for me, if it ain't broke, don't fix it.  But, don't think of me as an expert and you guys should do what you want to do.  

 

*Shelby ducks and runs from the canning experts*

With you. I learned the same way, and I don't add acid.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Wine and 'maters!  or should I say 'thoughts of 'maters' and wine.  Oh heck, wine goes with anything, I think. :laugh:

Hey, I have a pile of those little beggars.  I shall be interested to see what you come up with.  There is always that roasted tomatonand garlic recipe over in the garden thread.

 

Don't know who to do a link to there but here is the recipe from Elaina:

 

I always grow too many cherry tomatoes. Here's one of my favorite uses:

Slow Roasted Tomato Sauce with Basil and Parmesan. It takes along time to cook but it is worth it.

Preheat oven to 250. Heat 1/4 cup olive oil. Add 1 large onion, diced and 6 cloves garlic, diced. Cook about 4-5 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in 18 (yes! the recipe is this specific! You don't have to be!) shredded basil leaves and 1/8 t. red pepper flakes. 

In a deep roasting pan, combine 50 cherry tomatoes (I told you the recipe is specific - and I use more) with 2 t. sugar, 1 t. salt and onion mixture. Drizzle with 1/4 c. olive oil. Roast in 250 degree oven for 3 hours, stirring once. Serve over pasta with 1/2 c. parmesan and 1/4 c. basil ribbons.

I like this with a mix of different colored cherry tomatoes - I grow red, orange,black and white cherries. None ripe yet so I'm still waiting. 

Enjoy.

Elaina

Saving this post; will be making this sauce. Soon.

 

 

I may have a few more ears to do.  I did quite a few last week. This was my first time growing corn (well, growing sweet corn) and I planted 200 seeds.  Not near that many came up.  I planted them all the same so I don't know what went wrong.  Thus, I didn't have all that much.  And, some of it turned into huitlacoche (smut).  I cut it off the cob.  Do you freeze yours on the cob?

No, I cut it off. Takes less freezer room, and we generally like it better that way.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Oh, your pictures just make me cry.  For the first time in gardening career, I have had an almost complete failure.  I hurt my back getting the garden started, so I couldn't weed and mulch, and then we had more rain than I have ever seen here.  Fungus took peppers first, and then the tomatoes.  The few tomatoes I did get were eaten up by stinkbugs.  I actually bought some tomatoes the other day--the first tomatoes I have purchased in 15 years.

 

On a positive note, I did pick a peck of purple podded pole beans last night, and that was just a quarter of the row.  But they are just not the same on a sandwich.

So sorry to read your post, sparrowgrass.  What a disappointment. 

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Oh, your pictures just make me cry.  For the first time in gardening career, I have had an almost complete failure.  I hurt my back getting the garden started, so I couldn't weed and mulch, and then we had more rain than I have ever seen here.  Fungus took peppers first, and then the tomatoes.  The few tomatoes I did get were eaten up by stinkbugs.  I actually bought some tomatoes the other day--the first tomatoes I have purchased in 15 years.

 

On a positive note, I did pick a peck of purple podded pole beans last night, and that was just a quarter of the row.  But they are just not the same on a sandwich.

Oh no!  It's such hard work and then to have so much rain that you can't control.  I'm sorry :(  I've found stinkbugs on my 'maters this year, too.  Nasty little creatures.

 

I just tried to say "pick a peck of purple podded poles" five times and failed  :laugh:

 

With you. I learned the same way, and I don't add acid.

Phew.  I'm not alone!

 

 

I'm putzing around the kitchen getting organized so I'll be canning tomatoes soon.

Edited by Shelby (log)
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We've been keeping a list of our tomato weights.  We have a little contest every morning to see who picks the biggest tomato.  I'm not winning because someone seems to have scoped out where all of the big guys are growing.  :rolleyes:

 

P8110364.JPG

 

1.66 lbs. seems to be as big as they get........

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Is suspect as tomatoes started to be bred to be lower acid that the necessity to add acid occurred. As long as you use older varieties of tomatoes that are high acid you probably don't need the added acid unless for flavour.

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Is suspect as tomatoes started to be bred to be lower acid that the necessity to add acid occurred. As long as you use older varieties of tomatoes that are high acid you probably don't need the added acid unless for flavour.

That makes complete sense.  I do only use the older varieties because we like the taste the best.  We don't care for the yellow type.  I bet those might be lower in acid.

 

Believe me, ours have enough acid.  Just ask the canker sores I get at the end of summer after eating a zillion 'maters.  :laugh:

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Maybe we will be canning together  :smile:

 

Nice!!  20 lbs!  You were a busy person!

 

I'd love to hear more about the green tomato and pepper jam.  Jalapeño peppers?

 The recipe called for jalapenos, but I just used a literal mixed bag that my friend had given me.  There were long skinny red ones, a banana pepper, a couple that I think were habeneros...I didn't use as many as the recipe called for either since I know some were hotter.  I also doubled the original recipe but reduced the sugar to 4 cups overall.  Recipe here: http://www.closetcooking.com/2009/09/green-tomato-and-jalapeno-jam.html  

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 The recipe called for jalapenos, but I just used a literal mixed bag that my friend had given me.  There were long skinny red ones, a banana pepper, a couple that I think were habeneros...I didn't use as many as the recipe called for either since I know some were hotter.  I also doubled the original recipe but reduced the sugar to 4 cups overall.  Recipe here: http://www.closetcooking.com/2009/09/green-tomato-and-jalapeno-jam.html  

That sounds super good.  I think I'll make this towards the end of the season to use up the green tomatoes that are always left.  

 

I bet the long skinny red ones are Thai chile peppers.  I grow those too...although none of my peppers are going great guns this year.  

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If you have thai ( bird or not ) chile, pick them green as I think they have much better flavor.

 

you can freeze them if you plan to add them to some sort of tomato chutney.

 

my 2 cents for today.

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attachicon.gifP8100344.JPG

 

Got the cherry 'maters all cleaned up.  If I had one of those really cool, old wooden farm house tables, I'd use this as the centerpiece.  I think they are cheerful :)

 

 

Now I gotta nail down what to make for dinner.  We eat around 8 so, I have some time if I want to make something that takes time....we'll see.

 

Oh, and it's happy hour....time for wine.

I've been making this "recipe" from Smitten Kitchen with all my cherry tomatoes:  http://smittenkitchen.com/blog/2008/08/slow-roasted-tomatoes/ They are so delicious I haven't gotten any further than using them on toasted bread with ricotta for breakfast.  

 

Edited to add that your very next post mentioned that same technique, lol.

Edited by LizD518 (log)
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I just will have to make that sauce.  Period.

 

Oh yeah, I have about 30 quarts of tomatoes already put up.  And six quarts of juice.

 

I'm probably going to make you guys leave me forever, but I don't add any acid or lemon juice to my canned tomatoes.  Haven't ever and I've canned for twenty years.  Never ever had a problem.  A google showed me that in 1994 the experts changed and started to recommend adding acid.  I didn't learn that way, and for me, if it ain't broke, don't fix it.  But, don't think of me as an expert and you guys should do what you want to do.  

 

*Shelby ducks and runs from the canning experts*

How long do you process them?  I saw times ranging from 35 minutes to 85 minutes.  I consulted my mom who has done a lot of canning and she agreed that 85 seemed far too long so I went with 45-50 just to split the difference somewhat.  

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I'd be interested in the V8 recipe.  My husband drinks it most every morning.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here's the recipe for the faux - V8 juice (the recipe calls it Vegetable Juice Cocktail).  Because of all the vegetables this is not safe for canning unless you have a pressure canner. I freeze it. 

 

For about 5 1/2 quarts:

12 lbs tomatoes

2 peppers (any color - I use red)

3 medium onions

3 medium carrots

3 stalks celery (my addition)

bunch of parsley (my addition  - I don't measure)

1 T celery seed

 

Peel and cook tomatoes. Process other vegetables in food processor or blender until close to liquid. It helps to add some of the cooked tomatoes to the raw vegetables. Add to tomatoes with celery seed. Simmer about 45 minutes, put through a food mill, return to pan and bring back to a simmer. For each quart of juice, add 1 t. salt and 2 T lemon juice. The recipe also calls for 1 t. sugar - I omit this. Freeze.

 

The recipe gives directions for canning with a pressure canner. Since I don't have one I freeze it. If you do: pressure can 35 minutes at 10 pounds of pressure.

 

We just finished the last jar from last summer - i need those darn tomatoes to ripen so I can make this year's supply!

Elaina

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If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. Cicero

But the library must contain cookbooks. Elaina

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I've been making this "recipe" from Smitten Kitchen with all my cherry tomatoes:  http://smittenkitchen.com/blog/2008/08/slow-roasted-tomatoes/ They are so delicious I haven't gotten any further than using them on toasted bread with ricotta for breakfast.  

 

Edited to add that your very next post mentioned that same technique, lol.

 

LOL and that's the site that I found it on!  I skip the garlic, though, out of laziness.

How long do you process them?  I saw times ranging from 35 minutes to 85 minutes.  I consulted my mom who has done a lot of canning and she agreed that 85 seemed far too long so I went with 45-50 just to split the difference somewhat.  

I'm in Kansas, it differs if you are in a high elevation, but I do just like you're doing.  45 minutes.  I agree that 85 minutes is way too long.

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Here's the recipe for the faux - V8 juice (the recipe calls it Vegetable Juice Cocktail).  Because of all the vegetables this is not safe for canning unless you have a pressure canner. I freeze it. 

 

For about 5 1/2 quarts:

12 lbs tomatoes

2 peppers (any color - I use red)

3 medium onions

3 medium carrots

3 stalks celery (my addition)

bunch of parsley (my addition  - I don't measure)

1 T celery seed

 

Peel and cook tomatoes. Process other vegetables in food processor or blender until close to liquid. It helps to add some of the cooked tomatoes to the raw vegetables. Add to tomatoes with celery seed. Simmer about 45 minutes, put through a food mill, return to pan and bring back to a simmer. For each quart of juice, add 1 t. salt and 2 T lemon juice. The recipe also calls for 1 t. sugar - I omit this. Freeze.

 

The recipe gives directions for canning with a pressure canner. Since I don't have one I freeze it. If you do: pressure can 35 minutes at 10 pounds of pressure.

 

We just finished the last jar from last summer - i need those darn tomatoes to ripen so I can make this year's supply!

Elaina

Thank you for the recipe!  I don't have a pressure canner, either.   What type of container do you use to freeze it in?

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Thank you for the recipe!  I don't have a pressure canner, either.   What type of container do you use to freeze it in?

I freeze it either in quart canning jars (if I have any left after canning tomatoes and pickles!) or plastic quart freezer containers. I find freezing easier than canning - I freeze about half my tomatoes and can the rest. When they thaw they are kind of mushy but that's fine for sauce or soup. And I do enjoy, when I have family or friends cooking with me, handing an unsuspecting person what looks like a perfect fresh tomato but is actually hard as a rock.

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If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. Cicero

But the library must contain cookbooks. Elaina

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Shelby - You should put a pressure canner (I highly recommend All-American) on your Xmas list! It just seems to fit your lifestyle. I always thought you would be canning venison for stew or venison stew and things along that vein.

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Shelby - You should put a pressure canner (I highly recommend All-American) on your Xmas list! It just seems to fit your lifestyle. I always thought you would be canning venison for stew or venison stew and things along that vein.

It would come in handy.....I've just never been around those or learned how to use them.  Maybe I'm a bit scared of them kinda like I'm ....well, I hate to use the word "scared"....lets say I'm very respectful of the pressure cooker we have.   :blush:

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How you're managing to post while all this is going on is beyond me, but I'm glad you're doing it. :smile: A couple of comments and a question: Is that gargantuan tomato of this morning a Cherokee Red? I've never thought of including smoked eggplant in a pasta sauce, but I'll bet it's good. Did you strain out the seeds? Finally, I agree that the reason to add acid for canned tomatoes is the lack of natural acid in the newer breeds. When someone tells me 'this is a sweeter, less acid tomato' my mind translates the phrase to 'this tomato has no taste' and I shop elsewhere.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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We've been keeping a list of our tomato weights.  We have a little contest every morning to see who picks the biggest tomato.  I'm not winning because someone seems to have scoped out where all of the big guys are growing.  :rolleyes:

 

attachicon.gifP8110364.JPG

 

1.66 lbs. seems to be as big as they get........

That's pretty big.  The biggest for me was l lb 6 oz.   But, my Brandy Wines aren't ripe yet.  Yours looks like a Cherokee Purple?

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How you're managing to post while all this is going on is beyond me, but I'm glad you're doing it. :smile: A couple of comments and a question: Is that gargantuan tomato of this morning a Cherokee Red? I've never thought of including smoked eggplant in a pasta sauce, but I'll bet it's good. Did you strain out the seeds? Finally, I agree that the reason to add acid for canned tomatoes is the lack of natural acid in the newer breeds. When someone tells me 'this is a sweeter, less acid tomato' my mind translates the phrase to 'this tomato has no taste' and I shop elsewhere.

One must sit down and rehydrate from time to time and stopping to talk to you guys is the perfect excuse :)

 

Okanagancook asked the same thing about the Cherokee Red.......I swear I bought a couple of Brandywine plants, but maybe I'm wrong?  I've been calling them Brandywines.......

 

I absolutely love the eggplant in there.  Just gives it a slightly different "boost".  I didn't strain the seeds...I pulled a lot of them out before putting chunks in the sauce.  We don't mind a few seeds.

 

Exactly.  I feel the same way about less acidy tomatoes.  I want them to taste like tomatoes! Bring on the acid!   :biggrin:

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I am no expert on heirloom tomatoes, so don't let my question dissuade you from thinking those are Brandywines. It was a genuine question. :-) At any rate, your tomatoes look beautiful.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

Follow us on social media! Facebook; instagram.com/egulletx; twitter.com/egullet

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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"Cherokee Red"

 

There are also Cherokee black, Cherokee green, and Cherokee purple. 

 

What do the Cherokees have to do with those tomatoes? 

 

Wonderful blog so far. Thank you!

 

dcarch

Edited by dcarch (log)
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