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"Dry-Curing Pork" by Hector Kent: recipe question


operaflute
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Hello!

 

I'm  not sure if the "cookbook" section of the forum is the best choice for this post, but...

 

I recent was gifted "Dry-Curing Pork" by Hector Kent - a purely self serving gift from my boyfriend, I might add!  :laugh:

I'm going to make the coppiette this weekend, and his instructions for slicing the loin are a bit vague to me.

He directs to slice it in "... 3/4 inch strips at least 8 inches long."
Do you suppose the 3/4" dimension refer to thickness of the slice (ie the smallest of 3 dimensions), or might he mean thinner slices that are 3/4" wide? Misinterpreting this would really change the cure/dry time...  Am I making sense?

 

Thoughts?

 

And for fun, here's my report on my first attempt at his bacon recipe (among other things). Um... wow!

http://operaflute.blogspot.com/2015/06/when-time-is-on-your-side-bacon-and.html

 

Thanks!

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Sliced parallel with the grain of the loin.

~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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I'm pretty sure (based on the picture in the book) that 3/4" refers to the thickness of the strips and not the width, however, "real" coppiette that I've seen is more like 3/4" x 3/4" x 8".  :blink:

~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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