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Desserts from the 1960s?


pjm333
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The ubiquitous party dessert in the 1960s was the "dump" cake.  It wasn't my favorite - being a baker, I made cakes from scratch, but I went to a lot of parties where the main dessert offering was a dump cake.

 

This is an image from a site that has images and "recipes" for the different varieties.

Screen Shot 2015-07-21 at 7.31.45 PM.png

 

 

In my crowd it was ice cream cakes that got the most applause.

 

Pies that were popular in the '60s were some resurrected southern specialties:  Chess Pie and Black Bottom Pie.

 

In the late '60s we began seeing fruit tarts more often - including kiwi fruits that were just beginning to be popular and which were somewhat expensive.

One that I recall was a custard pie topped with sliced kiwi and strawberries - brought to a potluck at my home in 1969.  It sticks in my mind because we had to take my stepson to the ER because it turned out he was allergic to kiwi fruit.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Compared to some of the other candidates in this thread, I rather liked junket.  But I don't think I've had it since the 60's.

 

I was not referring to the milk custard but to the pretty red clearish one

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I was not referring to the milk custard but to the pretty red clearish one

 

The red pudding is Scandinavian "rodgrod" (with the slanty things through the "o"s).  Junket is rennet milk pudding.  There's an Amish/Mennonite buffet restaurant that has the red pudding on their dessert buffet all the time -- I love it topped with tapioca pudding!

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The ubiquitous party dessert in the 1960s was the "dump" cake.  It wasn't my favorite - being a baker, I made cakes from scratch, but I went to a lot of parties where the main dessert offering was a dump cake.

 

This is an image from a site that has images and "recipes" for the different varieties.

attachicon.gifScreen Shot 2015-07-21 at 7.31.45 PM.png

 

 

I forgot Dump Cake!  Certainly saw many a one at the annual family reunion party -- and ate some, too.  :)

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rødgrød

Usually served with cream so

Rødgrød med fløde

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Flambé anything was very fashionable:  Crepes Suzette, Cherries Jubilee, Bananas Foster, etc.  And you did see "Dump Cake" (although we called it "Panic") but that was mainly at informal gatherings like family reunions and church potlucks.  I don't recall ever seeing it at anybody's "fancy dinner party." 

 

I do recall as that being kind of the beginning of the Red Velvet Cake heyday, and Harvey Wallbanger Cake came along about that time, too. 

 

Cheesecake was the default go-to, please everybody, "nice" dessert.

 

But if this were my party, I'd definitely do the chocolate fondue. 

 

Everybody had fondue sets, most of which we received as wedding gifts, and if you weren't fonduing, you weren't nuttin'.

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I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Jaymes reminded me of the cheesecake using Philadelphia cream cheese and topped with canned cherry pie filling http://allrecipes.com/recipe/philadelphia-new-york-cheesecake/

 

Always requested, oohed & aaahed and devoured (just a little more)

OMG. When my husband was alive I searched and searched for that recipe could never find it. I made for him in the 60s and then like so many recipes it got dropped. Then it got lost I guess. I seem to recall it was once upon a time on the package of cream cheese.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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OMG. When my husband was alive I searched and searched for that recipe could never find it. I made for him in the 60s and then like so many recipes it got dropped. Then it got lost I guess. I seem to recall it was once upon a time on the package of cream cheese.

 

I think you're right - it was on the wrapper.  I sure made it a lot.  Might have been on the box of graham crackers as well.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Grasshopper pie

 

A ubiquitous blast from the past.

 

The fact that you even know about Grasshopper Pie ages you!

 

:biggrin:

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I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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A ubiquitous blast from the past.

 

The fact that you even know about Grasshopper Pie ages you!

 

:biggrin:

I'm 59. I remember Grasshopper Pie as very exotic. The association with booze especially.

Cheers,

Anne

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Am I the only one who remember Jell-O 123?  Or maybe it was later than the 60's?

I remember Jell-O. Had a lot of it in assorted variations. Remember cubes of it interspersed with whipped cream in parfait glasses. Very common in congealed salads and family desserts. But I don't ever remember being served it as dessert at a nice dinner party. I sure never did. And I entertained, and was entertained, a LOT in those days.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I still have several of the Tupperware Jell-O molds from the 1960s.  Also the recipe book.

 

However, molded salads and desserts go back much, much further than the '60s  and "jellies" were very popular desserts in the 19th century and before. 

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I cannot recall whether this dessert was "in" in the 60s or the 70s...but I do remember making it.  A purchased cake called a flan.  Then cover it with a variety of berries...fancy pattern if you had the time or the inclination.  And then a homemade glaze over top of this.  We called it a Fruit Flan. 

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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I cannot recall whether this dessert was "in" in the 60s or the 70s...but I do remember making it.  A purchased cake called a flan.  Then cover it with a variety of berries...fancy pattern if you had the time or the inclination.  And then a homemade glaze over top of this.  We called it a Fruit Flan. 

 

Very interesting.  Think that might have been a Canadian version of what we folk south of you called a Fruit Tart. 

 

I made it a lot, primarily as a dessert for myriad ladies' functions -  luncheons, coffees, teas, mahjong & bridge parties, assorted "advisory committee" meetings, etc. - and it was hugely popular, although I'm pretty sure it was the 70s, and maybe even later than that.  I didn't buy anything as the base, however.  It started with a giant sugar cookie crust.  Then you mixed up a sweet cream-cheese concoction and spread it onto the cookie, arranged the fruit over, then a glaze.  It was really good and I've made it often throughout the years. 

 

Sample recipe:  http://www.cookingchanneltv.com/recipes/kelsey-nixon/sugar-cookie-crust-fruit-pizza.html

Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Jaymes, your American version was much fancier than the 'Canadian' version.  The purchased base was a soft vanilla cake which was only a couple of inches high and had a slightly higher rim.  The fruit went straight onto the cake with a clear glaze over it.   But then we Canadians are always known for being modest and polite and not in the least exciting.  :raz: :raz:

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Jaymes, your American version was much fancier than the 'Canadian' version.  The purchased base was a soft vanilla cake which was only a couple of inches high and had a slightly higher rim.  The fruit went straight onto the cake with a clear glaze over it.   But then we Canadians are always known for being modest and polite and not in the least exciting.  :raz: :raz:

 

I met a rude Canadian.  Once.  Long ago.

 

Although, come to think of it, maybe she was French.

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I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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