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Hermann Morr

Cappelletti con sugo di Stracotto

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When grandmum made Cappelletti last christmas i took some pics , so i can share this tutorial.

 

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Cappelletti are pillows of pasta stuffed with bread, parmesan and stracotto juice, cooked in a chicken broth soup.
So what is Stracotto: its just a Pot Roast made from some tough and unexpensive beef cut, simmered for a long time, 6 to 10 hours depending on the cut you choose and your willingness of making the ultimate sacrifice driyng your meat in order to get the best roast juice vs having a proper and tender pot roast on your table.

 

 

 

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Start heating some olive oil in a pot and sweating finely cut onion, carrot, celery and garlic.
Add a couple bay leaves, one rosemary branch, sage. Brown the meat.
You may use just beef or add more meats to your liking, like a quarter capon, a pork rib, a sausage.

Once the meat is browned pour a glass of still red wine, let it dry, cover with water or stock, adjust salt and turn fire to minimum.

 

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Cover the pot and let it simmer. You can use a common lid, but true parmesan grandmums cover their stracotto pots with a clay dish with a thin crack running through the middle and fill it with wine and sweet spices, like cinnamom and clover.

In theory the evaporating wine should penetrate through the crack and diffuse the spices scent in your simmering pot.

 

 

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Simmering does'nt have to happen all the same day, tradition is starting friday with all the preps, simmering a few time, then turning off the fire and starting again saturday morning.
At last the meat should be falling apart as you touch it with a fork.

Once it's done separate the clean juice with a sieve.
The solid vegetable bits and a small part of the juice will season the stracotto meat, serve it with polenta or tagliatelle noodles. Or mash if you just can't live without.

The liquid part will be the flavour of your cappelletti stuff.

 


Edited by Hermann Morr (log)
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For the stuff you need 150 grams ground bread ( 5 oz. ), 150 grams ground parmesan, two eggs, pinch of megnut and your stracotto juice.

 

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Mix bread, cheese, eggs and megnut in a bowl, pour the warm juice and knead with your hands till you have a firm and uniform dough.

Parmesan cheese should be at least 30 months old to have the right texture.

 

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For the pasta dough you need 1 kg all-purpose flour, 200 grams semolina and eight eggs.
Mix all toghether, add a few water and salt, knead.
Kneading will take some time, 20 minutes minimum, italian cookin doesn't require expensive ingredients, but is labour intensive.

Once in a while cut the dough to see how it is inside. When you find tiny bubbles it's done.

 

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Edited by Hermann Morr (log)

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Now pasta machine time: make long sheets.

 

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Distribute bits of stuff over the sheets, fold and cut your cappelletti with the help of a tiny glass.

Press the glass strongly or the edges won't seal perfectly.

 
 
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thank you for a very nice tutorial.

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