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Darienne

Bomba Calabrese: I need a good recipe

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A friend recently gifted me with a small jar of this incredible Bomba Calabrese.  I thought I'd died and gone to spicy heaven.  :wub: :wub:  This particular brand is made by Gigi and is a product of Italy.  The ingredients are: eggplant, pepper, hot chili peppers, mushrooms, artichokes, sunflower oil, olive oil, spices and salt.  It is also not in chunks or pieces, but is easily spreadable.

 

I found a few recipes for Bomba Calabrese online, but would like to try one that someone from eG recommends if possible.  Barring that, I will make one of the found recipes and blenderize it perhaps.  And also try to locate the product locally.  I've contacted the distributor but not heard back yet.

 

Thanks for any help.


Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Thanks Kerry, I'll look for it.  We have no Loblaws in Peterpatch, but we do have Superstore, so maybe they will carry it. 


Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Reading italian language recipes for Bomba i see they use canned vegs in oil.to save time.

 

So, start with fresh red hot pepper, add 1 garlic clove every 250 grams pepper, then all the vegs in oil and herbs you like you like ( bell pepper, eggplant, artichoke, sun dried tomato, capers, someone adds salted anchovy fillets too ). Blend it all to desired texture.

 

There is a longer procedure starting from raw vegs.

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"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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Alas.  DH spent a goodly time in Peterborough's Super Store today looking for Allessia La Bomba Hot Antipasto Spread with no luck.  Then he found it in the local FreshCo.  Not quite the same...not as nippy...but still good.  I'm not complaining.

 

No useful recipes have come my way.  I found one online which is chunky and I guess I could make it and process it.


Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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I don't have a recipe, but share your fondness for the stuff. I first  found the Dinamite version on the left in Greve Italy, in Chianti and bought it as a gift for some friends at work. They raved about it so much that I bought more on our next trip and tried it myself and liked it as well. I searched high and low on this board, in NYC, every Italian specialty shop I ever set foot in and on the web in general. I found the Coluccio version which is good, but not as hot and pretty pricey, but you can mail order it. It must be a regional thing because when I asked shopkeepers in nearby Florence, they just shrugged. We are returning to Chianti in September of next year and I will be sure and buy more.  

 

Bomba Calabrese.jpg

 

 

HC

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This has piqued my curiosity. I've never heard of it so I picked this up today:

image.jpgimage.jpg

I'm heading out of town tomorrow but looking forward to trying it in a couple of weeks.

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Did some more searching online last night and still have found only the one chunky-type Bomba Calabrese. 

 

There are at least 8 brands of Bomba Calabrese available and probably a lot more I didn't find.  The one that DH and I really liked is made by Gigi and is distributed in Canada by Gigi Importing in Brampton, ON, a small city just west of Toronto. 

 

On further tasting (generously) the Alessia brand of Bomba I have to say, and with the agreement of DH, it is not nearly as zippy as the Gigi and it has too much oil in it.  I drained some of the oil out of it and at the risk of encountering derision from purists, I am going to mix in a bit of Sambal Oelek to see if that can zip it up a bit. 

 

Added:  read the ingredients carefully this time around and the Alessia contains...gasp...soybean oil and not olive oil.  Some things are not to be endured....


Edited by Darienne (log)

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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I am gearing up to making my own Bomba Calabrese but in the meantime, I opened the second bottle of the Alessia brand which DH bought me last week.  Of course, I've noshed down the first.

 

I dumped the contents of the bottle into a sieve and just let it drain for a few minutes.  I was stunned to measure the oil collected.  The entire contents measure 314 ml and the oil was 80 ml.   A quarter of this expensive little goodie is oil.  Not pleased.


Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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DH bought me another brand of Bomba Calabrese today.   Looks a bit like the one Chris posted a while back.

P1010001_67.JPG

 

I opened it.  Took a small forkful.  And the most excruciating hot pain screamed into the back of my throat and up into my ears.  I couldn't function for about 10 minutes.  Fortunately we had milk on hand and I drank some.  Never had anything like that happen before.  And hope never to have it again.

 

I can't imagine that the Bomba is really that hot all the way through.  That MUST have been some kind of weird occurrence.  I wonder.  I'll get back.  But not today.

 

BTW, my friend, the gifter, says the Gigi is carried by Food Basics in her area.  We don't have a Food Basics in our area.

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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I don't have a Food Basics in this area either but I will look everywhere I go, Darienne, and if I find some, I will send it on.

Edited to add: I found the Gigi site online and they are in Brampton. http://gigi.swsehosting.com/about This page has their phone number and address, and on the (Products) page that shows the Gigi Bomba Calabrese bottle there is a way to download an order form - but I would call them and ask if they can ship you some or tell you where they distribute in the Peterborough area.


Edited by Deryn (log)
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Thanks so much for your offer, Deryn, but please do let it lie for now.  I emailed the Brampton firm a couple of weeks ago and have not heard back from them.  I will call them next.  Just been too swamped to get around to it.  There's a Food Basics in Lindsay, 1/2 hour from the farm, and we'll try there next.  Thanks again for your research on my behalf.

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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On ‎7‎/‎8‎/‎2015 at 4:45 PM, Darienne said:

A friend recently gifted me with a small jar of this incredible Bomba Calabrese.  I thought I'd died and gone to spicy heaven.  :wub: :wub: This particular brand is made by Gigi and is a product of Italy.  The ingredients are: eggplant, pepper, hot chili peppers, mushrooms, artichokes, sunflower oil, olive oil, spices and salt.  It is also not in chunks or pieces, but is easily spreadable.

 

I found a few recipes for Bomba Calabrese online, but would like to try one that someone from eG recommends if possible.  Barring that, I will make one of the found recipes and blenderize it perhaps.  And also try to locate the product locally.  I've contacted the distributor but not heard back yet.

 

Thanks for any help.

I recently found this and kinda remembered someone had requested a recipe. This guy's presentation is a little annoying, but the recipe looks pretty good.

HC

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QBzEqyUu2to

 

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Thanks HungryChris.  I just might try it.

 

My friend brought me some more jars of Bomba Calabrese...but something has happened to the formula in the interim and it was a great disappointment (although I didn't tell my friend).

 

And, the guy's presentation is a LOT annoying.  Thanks again.

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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On 1/24/2018 at 7:06 PM, Darienne said:

Thanks HungryChris.  I just might try it.

 

My friend brought me some more jars of Bomba Calabrese...but something has happened to the formula in the interim and it was a great disappointment (although I didn't tell my friend).

 

And, the guy's presentation is a LOT annoying.  Thanks again.

Have you tried the Allesia La Bomba?

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1 hour ago, Kerry Beal said:

Have you tried the Allesia La Bomba?

 

On 14/07/2015 at 2:28 PM, Darienne said:

 

On further tasting (generously) the Alessia brand of Bomba I have to say, and with the agreement of DH, it is not nearly as zippy as the Gigi and it has too much oil in it.  I drained some of the oil out of it and at the risk of encountering derision from purists, I am going to mix in a bit of Sambal Oelek to see if that can zip it up a bit. 

 

Added:  read the ingredients carefully this time around and the Alessia contains...gasp...soybean oil and not olive oil.  Some things are not to be endured....

 

Done and not passed the test.


Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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I just tried my first batch of homemade Bomba Calabrese, using the youtube method above. It really is quite good!

HC

IMG_1885.thumb.JPG.4b53a9737f974ff51e784068e23a6b81.JPGIMG_1884.thumb.JPG.7d74c3a7bc74c1d6f87b7e7a592f26e8.JPG

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