• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

liuzhou

Chinese Dessert

60 posts in this topic

Yes, exactly that! It was a lovely old lady who was selling her wares just outside the summer palace at Chengde. 

 

Right, now I really have to buy that tree :D It was in 1995 so it was almost certainly Chinese hawthorn. Thanks so much! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Lisa Shock said:

How common is ginger milk custard?

 @Lisa Shock

Have you tried to make this? Really appeals to me and I might have to give it a try!   Thanks for the link.

2 hours ago, Lisa Shock said:

How common is ginger milk custard?

 


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Tere said:

Not a dessert as such, but I had a delicious street food in Chengde many years ago. The lady (with help from the guide) described them as "Hawthorn berries" but I think they were probably goji berries

 

They are not goji berries, but as your guide said Chinese hawthorn berries糖葫芦 (táng hú lu). They are available all over China, usually from itinerant street vendors, but sometimes small shops or kiosks.

 

imageproxy.php?img=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.liuzes


Edited by liuzhou typo (log)
4 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heh. No problems. At the time I just assumed translation fail as I had no idea there was a hawthorn with such big fruits. Definitely one to try in the fruit garden I think :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Anna N said:

 @Lisa Shock

Have you tried to make this? Really appeals to me and I might have to give it a try!   Thanks for the link.

 

I have been too lazy to try it, which is silly, I know. I have been meaning to test it out with various sweeteners and other flavor components to see how far it can be pushed. I think I keep forgetting to get a nice fresh chunk of ginger, I've been using ginger I put up in some vinegar for general cooking. At some point, lets start a new thread about this dessert, because I see a lot of potential for it. (low cal -compared to other custards, good for people with egg allergies, easy to make, no oven needed, etc.)

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today, after lunch, a friend and I went to one of the many dessert only places in town. She slightly over-ordered. This lot turned up for the two of us.

 

56e51350dfcb6_IchibanDesserts.jpg.c0e5ca

 

The small dessert restaurant is part of a Hong Kong franchise operation and offers HK style desserts. All the above are mango based.

 

Clockwise from top left.

 

Vanilla ice cream with chopped mango covered with powdered cocoa and a sprig of mint. Served in a flower pot, of course.

Mango in a light mousse.

Mango cream puffs

Ice cream with mango and melon balls.

 

I ate the flowerpot and half the mousse then gave up. My companion demolished the rest, then polished off a mango cake she had purchased elsewhere. She is tiny. Where does she put it all?


Edited by liuzhou typo (log)
6 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On March 1, 2016 at 4:20 PM, Lisa Shock said:

How common is ginger milk custard?

So got around to making this today - picked up the ginger a couple of weeks back - kept looking at it every time I walked past - today was the day!

 

Followed the Khymos method - cutting back to a few grams of ginger juice in each of two cups - heating the milk with a bit of sugar to 65º C in the microwave - pouring from a bit of a height to mix.

 

Finished production just before heading out to work - so popped them in the fridge uncertain if they would turn out. Pretty perfect!

 

IMG_1917.jpg.8bae03a563ece79061a228a701e

 

IMG_1920.jpg.081a1cd42af45eca614134ec486

 

IMG_1921.jpg.cd39b1cd16a971521674775d078

5 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 02/03/2016 at 5:20 AM, Lisa Shock said:

How common is ginger milk custard?

 

It isn't something I've ever encountered, but it seems to be a Hong Kong /Guangdong Cantonese speciality. I'm heading to Guangzhou (Canton) for a few days next month, so I'll keep a look out for it.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By maui420
      last night was my first attempt at a blueberry coffecake. it came out awesome but i felt that the topping part could be better. basicall, from the top of my head, it was 1 cup of brown sugar, 2/3 c flour, 1/2 cup of small diced up butter, and some cinnamon.
      the topping came out ok but seemed a little "grainy" like sandy and didnt have that crumbly bubbly style top.
      suggestions? thanks. will post pics next time.
    • By Amy D.
      I couldn't find a thread covering this, but apologies if there is.
       
      As I'm planning the food for a family gathering I realise again that we have a few desserts that we often fall back on. Partly because they are easy to prepare, minimal effort for the cook that is busy producing food to feed 20-30, and don't suffer from sitting on the buffet table. But mainly, because these are the crowd pleasing desserts, the one that are enjoyed by young and old alike. They can be altered and elaborated but in reality everyone would be just as satisfied with the dish in its more simple form, perhaps due to the associated memories.
       
      some of our crowd pleasers are pavlova, banoffee pie and triffle.
       
      https://thehappyfoodie.co.uk/recipes/strawberry-pavlova
       
      http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/banoffeepie_89031
       
      so what about other egulleters, do you have a tradition of easy crowd pleasing desserts?
    • By Soul_Venom
      The best Chinese food restaurant I have ever been to is a place called the Imperial Buffet in Aberdeen SD. Their General Tso's is unlike the Tso's anywhere else. The closes comparison I could make is the Orange Chicken at the Panda Garden only 3x better. Their Lo-Mein Noodles are done with the skill of a master Italian pasta chef & perfectly seasoned. They also used to do a mean fried squid. I say used to because they had it when I lived in Aberdeen from 02-04 but didn't when I visited in 15'. One of their other discontinued specialties was a dish advertised as 'Golden Fried Cauliflower'. Note, this was NOT a breaded product. The cauliflower was cooked as though it had been boiled perfectly. It was not greasy as I recall but was a golden orange color as was the sauce it was evidently cooked in. I never could identify the flavors in that sauce. I wish I could describe it better but it has been well over a decade since I had it. Is anyone familiar with it or something similar? I can't seem to find anything like it online & all my searches just bring up links to breaded deep-fried crap.
    • By Lam
      I have been experiementing with macarons these last few months, and I have yet to make perfect macarons. Most of the macarons I have made are hollow on the inside. They're so hollow, if I nudge them a bit, the top crust just comes right off. They still taste decent but not what a successful macaron should be like. I don't think I am overbeating my meringue at all. They are always firm and stiff. I have tried whipping a little less than I usually do but still get hollows. I did some research and saw a few people recommend adding a bit of cornstarch to the dry mix. Yep. Cornstarch.  This really perplexed me because I always see people saying not to use powdered sugar that contains cornstarch, so how could adding cornstarch prevent hollow macs? I also saw one person use tapioca starch to prevent hollows as well. This time around, I whipped the meringue at a much longer time, but no higher than speed 7 (kitchenaid), which gave me a super stable meringue. I also added cornstarch. I piped the batter out, and they looked super perfect the first few minutes in the oven. Sadly, they came out very wrinkled. The first batch was super wrinkled, but the second batch was less wrinkled, or bumpy even. Not sure if this is because of the silpat for the first batch and the parchment pper for the second hmm. Does anyone know what I did wrong to get these wrinkled macs and how to troubleshoot? Also some help on hollow macs would be appreciated! Thanks




    • By liuzhou
      An old friend from England contacted me yesterday via Facebook with a couple of questions about Five Spice Powder.

      Thought there me be some interest here, too.

      Is there anything more typically Chinese than five spice powder (五香粉 - wǔ xiāng fěn)?
       
      Well, yes. A lot.
       
      Many years ago, I worked in an office overlooking London’s China town. By around 11 am, the restaurants started getting lunch ready and the smell of FSP blanketed the area for the rest of the day. When I moved to China, I didn’t smell that. Only when I first visited Hong Kong, did I find that smell again.
       
      In fact, FSP is relatively uncommon in most of Chinese cuisine. And if I ever see another internet recipe called “Chinese” whatever, which is actually any random food, but the genius behind it has added FSP, supposedly rendering it Chinese, I’ll scream.

      I get all sorts of smells wafting through the neighbourhood. Some mouth-watering; some horrifying. But I don't recall ever that they were FSP.
       
      But what is it anyway? Which five spices?
       
      Today, I bought four samples in four local supermarkets. I would have would have preferred five, but couldn’t find any more. It's not that popular.
       
      First thing to say: none of them had five spices. All had more. That is normal. Numbers in Chinese can often be vague. Every time you hear a number, silently added the word ‘about’ or ‘approximately’. 100 km means “far”, 10,000 means “many”.
       
      Second, while there are some common factors, ingredients can vary quite a bit. Here are my four.

      1.


       
      Ingredients – 7
       
      Star Anise, Fennel Seed, Orange Peel, Cassia Bark, Sand Ginger, Dried Ginger, Sichuan Peppercorns.
       
      2.
       

       
      Ingredients – 6
       
      Cassia Bark, Star Anise, Fennel Seed, Coriander, Sichuan Peppercorn, Licorice Root.

      3.
       

       
      Ingredients – 15
       
      Fennel Seeds, Sichuan Peppercorns, Coriander, Tangerine Peel, Star Anise, Chinese Haw, Cassia Bark, Lesser Galangal, Dahurian Angelica, Nutmeg, Dried Ginger, Black Pepper, Amomum Villosum, Cumin Seeds, Cloves.

      4.
       

       
      Ingredients – 6
       
      Pepper (unspecified – probably black pepper), Sichuan Peppercorns, Star Anise, Fennel Seeds, Nutmeg, Cassia.
       
      So, take your pick. They all taste and smell almost overwhelmingly of the star anise and cassia, although there are subtle differences in taste in the various mixes.
       
      But I don’t expect to find it in many dishes in local restaurants or homes. A quick, unscientific poll of about ten friends today revealed that not one has any at home, nor have they ever used the stuff!
       
       
      I'm not suggesting that FSP shouldn't be used outside of Chinese food. Please just don't call the results Chinese when you sprinkle it on your fish and chips or whatever. They haven't miraculously become Chinese!

      Like my neighbours and friends, I very rarely use it at all.

      In fact, I'd be delighted to hear how it is used in other cultures / cuisines.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.