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Tere   

Yes, exactly that! It was a lovely old lady who was selling her wares just outside the summer palace at Chengde. 

 

Right, now I really have to buy that tree :D It was in 1995 so it was almost certainly Chinese hawthorn. Thanks so much! :)

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Anna N   
2 hours ago, Lisa Shock said:

How common is ginger milk custard?

 @Lisa Shock

Have you tried to make this? Really appeals to me and I might have to give it a try!   Thanks for the link.

2 hours ago, Lisa Shock said:

How common is ginger milk custard?

 


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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liuzhou   
16 hours ago, Tere said:

Not a dessert as such, but I had a delicious street food in Chengde many years ago. The lady (with help from the guide) described them as "Hawthorn berries" but I think they were probably goji berries

 

They are not goji berries, but as your guide said Chinese hawthorn berries糖葫芦 (táng hú lu). They are available all over China, usually from itinerant street vendors, but sometimes small shops or kiosks.

 

imageproxy.php?img=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.liuzes


Edited by liuzhou typo (log)
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Tere   

Heh. No problems. At the time I just assumed translation fail as I had no idea there was a hawthorn with such big fruits. Definitely one to try in the fruit garden I think :)

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9 hours ago, Anna N said:

 @Lisa Shock

Have you tried to make this? Really appeals to me and I might have to give it a try!   Thanks for the link.

 

I have been too lazy to try it, which is silly, I know. I have been meaning to test it out with various sweeteners and other flavor components to see how far it can be pushed. I think I keep forgetting to get a nice fresh chunk of ginger, I've been using ginger I put up in some vinegar for general cooking. At some point, lets start a new thread about this dessert, because I see a lot of potential for it. (low cal -compared to other custards, good for people with egg allergies, easy to make, no oven needed, etc.)

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liuzhou   

Today, after lunch, a friend and I went to one of the many dessert only places in town. She slightly over-ordered. This lot turned up for the two of us.

 

56e51350dfcb6_IchibanDesserts.jpg.c0e5ca

 

The small dessert restaurant is part of a Hong Kong franchise operation and offers HK style desserts. All the above are mango based.

 

Clockwise from top left.

 

Vanilla ice cream with chopped mango covered with powdered cocoa and a sprig of mint. Served in a flower pot, of course.

Mango in a light mousse.

Mango cream puffs

Ice cream with mango and melon balls.

 

I ate the flowerpot and half the mousse then gave up. My companion demolished the rest, then polished off a mango cake she had purchased elsewhere. She is tiny. Where does she put it all?


Edited by liuzhou typo (log)
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On March 1, 2016 at 4:20 PM, Lisa Shock said:

How common is ginger milk custard?

So got around to making this today - picked up the ginger a couple of weeks back - kept looking at it every time I walked past - today was the day!

 

Followed the Khymos method - cutting back to a few grams of ginger juice in each of two cups - heating the milk with a bit of sugar to 65º C in the microwave - pouring from a bit of a height to mix.

 

Finished production just before heading out to work - so popped them in the fridge uncertain if they would turn out. Pretty perfect!

 

IMG_1917.jpg.8bae03a563ece79061a228a701e

 

IMG_1920.jpg.081a1cd42af45eca614134ec486

 

IMG_1921.jpg.cd39b1cd16a971521674775d078

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liuzhou   
On 02/03/2016 at 5:20 AM, Lisa Shock said:

How common is ginger milk custard?

 

It isn't something I've ever encountered, but it seems to be a Hong Kong /Guangdong Cantonese speciality. I'm heading to Guangzhou (Canton) for a few days next month, so I'll keep a look out for it.

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