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New Ideas for Bone-in, Skin-on Chicken


pistolabella
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I love a good split chicken breast, I really do. But I'm looking for some new ideas. They are so versatile and flavorful; I typically do  one of the following : a good marinade and then grill 'em, or make a tasty "coq au vin". Who has a good suggestion for me, even if it's a new-to-me marinade, or something I can do differently on the grill with them?

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The topic title says, "New Ideas for Bone-in, Skin-on Chicken," but you say you like "flavorful" chicken breasts.

 

Any chance you can be convinced to try an even more flavorful bone-in, skin-on chicken thigh?

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So we finish the eighteenth and he's gonna stiff me. And I say, "Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort, you know." And he says, "Oh, uh, there won't be any money. But when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness."

So I got that goin' for me, which is nice.

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Some ideas off the top of my head in a few seconds...for your bone-in skin-on chicken breasts...

Pad kee mao

Pad see eu

Pad woon sen

Kari kapitan

Chik kut teh

Ayam goreng

Inche kabin

etc etc etc

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Bone-in, skin-on is perfect for oven roasting. If you switch to thighs, you can rub with salt and some herbs (maybe lemon zest) and oven roast (start oven at 425° and reduce to 350° after 10 minutes, cook until thermometer reads 165° at the bone) to get good results pretty quickly without much fuss. This will get you juicy roasted chicken with crispy skin. If you're just making a couple pieces, you can toss some root vegetables or thick cut cauliflower or brussels sprouts, etc. on the same pan about halfway through -just toss them in a little oil and salt first.

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If you are wedded to breasts - either under the skin or in a pocket slit: pesto or tapenade or other flavorful thick paste. Roast or grill (grill to side of main heat) on citrus slices

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For moist, favorable chicken no matter what parts, try an overnight soak in both buttermilk and salt. Although personally the breast is my least favorite part of the chicken I find that this approach will result in the breast meat not getting that dried out, sawdust texture that can often happen. Be sure to rinse off all traces of buttermilk before cooking since I've had the chicken brown/burn before the inside is done (perhaps milk sugar solids?). You can also add flavors to the buttermilk -- onions, garlic, black peppercorns -- whatever you choose. Just make sure to go lighter on the salt in any spice rub you use.

Inside me there is a thin woman screaming to get out, but I can usually keep the Bitch quiet: with CHOCOLATE!!!

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Vote for thighs too.

 

All of huiray's ideas are great.

 

I also second Lisa's method. I marinate in a mixture of citrus, salt, paprika, herbs and olive oil for at least an hour, then roast at 400F on a sheet pan, turned halfway to skin up, crisped at end for a couple minutes under the broiler.

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I prefer bone in skin on chicken for cacciatore, and I have never seen it in a restaurant. They always use boneless and often skinless cuts. My way produces a much richer tomato chicken gravy with greater depth of flavor.

 

If anyone is interested, I can tell you how I do it.

 

I can also dig up a recipe for "Virginia Beach Chicken" that uses bone in skin on breasts, dried beef, bacon, rice, and (look away purists) cream of mushroom canned soup. I'm not a fan of breasts either, but this is a way to deal with them to insure moistness and flavor.

 

When frying a whole chicken, I'll do the initial uncovered browning, then remove the breasts for about 8 minutes before adding them back to the covered pan with the rest of the chicken.

 

I've had good result with the "turned roast chicken" technique from the "Joy of Cooking" for roasting a whole chicken. It keeps the breasts and everything else moister while allowing the thigh/leg joints to cook through.

> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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I like making adobo (Filipino). Put chicken pieces in a pot, add vinegar (plam, coconut, white, apple or a combination that you like), soy sauce, peppercorn, garlic (lots of it), bay leaves. Cook covered for 20-30 minutes, until the chicken is about 10 minutes from being cooked through. Uncovered and add sugar to taste. Continued to cook until done.  I usually use wings for this, but bone in, skin on chicken thights would work. For thights, I usually like the version with coconut milk. Same flavors as above plus coconut milk, chilis and tumeric. I would usually marinade the chicken the night before and then everything goes into a pot to cook. I don't really have measurements for adobo as I just make it by taste. You can marinade the chicken using the non-coconut version of adobo as flavoring and then bake.

 

I tried a miso-butter-honey roasted thighs a while back and that was nice.

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Shel - You cook chicken breasts (are they bone in or boneless, by the way?) DIRECTLY over HOT coals for 40 minutes? Are you sure? How big are these breasts? Do you ever turn them? Do you move them to the side at all?

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Shel - You cook chicken breasts (are they bone in or boneless, by the way?) DIRECTLY over HOT coals for 40 minutes? Are you sure? How big are these breasts? Do you ever turn them? Do you move them to the side at all?

 

Whoops!  Somehow that old typo didn't get corrected.  I put the recipe into my computer years ago, and every time I referred to it I made a mental note to correct the error.  Sorry.

 

I just cook 'em until done.  If I grill outdoors, I put the breasts over high heat for a bit and then move them aside.  However, for the past two years I've been unable to cook outside, so I've made the breasts (generally bone in, but not always, and, as suggested in the recipe, not always skin on) in the oven.

 

Thanks for catching they typo.  Gotta find a way to fix it.

 ... Shel


 

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My favorite easy way of cooking bone-in chicken is the Dinosaur Bar B Que's mojito chicken. I do it with chicken thighs but bone-in breast would work. Just marinate the chicken pieces over night in the mojito marinade, put a lot of thick sliced onions in a baking dish, add the chicken and marinade and bake at 375 for 1 hour and 15 minutes  (or so). Serve chicken and onions with pan sauce, a sprinkle of parsley if you like, over rice. Little mess to clean up and no fuss. 

The Dinosaur Mojito marinade is available in stores here but they helpfully give the recipe in their cookbook: (this makes a lot - I halve it usually) Mix 1/4 cup chopped garlic, 1/2 cup chopped onion, 2 cups orange juice, 1/2 cup lime juice. Heat 1/2 cup olive oil  in a large saucepan until just smoking. Here I will quote the cookbook "Now cover up your arms and put some potholders on your hands because you are about to do something that is contrary to good cooking practice but produces great flavor release." (Dinosaur Bar B Que has little respect for good cooking practice but their food is great both in the restaurant and from their cookbook.) Slide the mixture into the hot oil. Simmer 5 minutes. Season with 4 t. kosher salt, 1 T black pepper, 2 t ground cumin, 2 t dried oregano and 1T chopped fresh cilantro. I often leave out the cilantro because i don't have any and I am not about to buy an entire bunch for 1 T. 

 

More complicated (and not necessarily better) is a Basque recipe. The chicken pieces are rubbed with salt, pepper and sweet paprika and baked at 375 for about 35 minutes. Use a dish that you can also put on a burner. Meanwhile you make a sauce by sautéing chopped onions, prosciutto, chopped red and green peppers- cook about 10 minutes, add lots of crushed garlic and 2 chopped tomatoes, some white wine and a little chicken stock. Cover and cook about 15 minutes, add salt and pepper to taste. Take the chicken out of the oven, (optionally: put on a burner over medium heat, add some brandy and flambé), pour the sauce over the chicken, reduce oven temperature to 325 and bake for 15 minutes.  Really wonderful. 

 

Elaina

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But the library must contain cookbooks. Elaina

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Chicken canzanese is good and I use both thighs and breasts.

 

The skin stays nice and crispy which I love.

Edited by suzilightning (log)
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Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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For some reason I thought this was about whole chicken. My suggestion is to "spatchcock" or butterfly a whole chicken (can be a rock/cornish hen if desired) which is to remove the entire spine and spread the chicken out flat skin side up. 

 

Any compound butter can be worked under the skin to add a lot of flavor during the roasting or grilling. I like to do it on the pit, but have done in the oven as well. IMO whole chicken done this way cooks quickly, more evenly and is easy to break down for serving.

 

I shoot for around an hour at 375F for a regular chicken. Might take longer. A thermometer should read over 170F and the juices should run clear before removing from the heat source.

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When I looked up the recipe, I found it in Emeril's New New Orleans Cookbook and not Paul Prudhomme.  Sorry.  Stuffing is onions, andouille sausage (which we made seeing you can't get anything like that here), green onions, celery, bell pepper, garlic, Emeril's Creole Seasoning, Jalapeño Corn Muffins (another Emeril recipe) and chicken stock.  Then you make the Andouille Cream to go with.  The cream is andouille sausage, tomatoes, green onions, onions, garlic cream, Emeril's Creole Seasonings.  All in all it a lengthly recipe because you have to make the Jalapeño muffins, the pastry, the cream and the stuffing.  But it was worth it.  You can probably find all those recipes on line.  cheers

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