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Japanese curry


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I didn't know about it until you mentioned it, and I think I have seen a TV commercial for it for the first time today.

You can view a commerical from here.

You must click OK to view it.

It sounds like an attractive product.  I'll look for it the next time I go shopping.

I got one pack of Prime Vermont (medium hot) for 278 yen today. I'll post a picture of it when I make curry with it, along with some comments.

glad to hear, also if you dont mind, saying what the calories/fat amount/saturated fat/sodium amount is for a one person serving ?

I can't provide all of the information you requested.

According to the label on the box,

Nutrient components of 18.5 g (for one serving) of the product

Energy: 80 kcal

Protein: 1.3 g

Fat: 3.6 g

Carbohydrate: 10.5 g

Sodium: 1.0 g (sodium chloride equivalent: 2.5 g)

Energy of one serving of the curry when made with the ingredients listed* (beef used for meat):

250 kcal (not including rice)

Sodium chloride equivalent: 2.7 g

*Ingredients for 10 servings:

400 g meat

3 medium (600 g) onions

2 medium (300 g) potatoes

1 medium (200 g) carrot

2 tbsp. salad oil

1,200 ml water

***

I wanted to make curry for supper yesterday, but both of my children replied, "Hayashi!" when I asked them which they wanted to have for supper.

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Gosh...I wish I could get some Prime Curry here...stinks that the selection isn't so great and that its too new to find on any online shops. I just want one box to try :( :(

Oh well, guess I'll have to wait, hopefully House-Foods keeps it going for a while...long enough to show up either at some grocery stores or online...

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Much less satisfying than I thought it would be. Quite bland. It's a little surprising that the lack of fat can make you so unsatisified. Even if I wanted to taste it closely, it was so runny that it escaped my tongue so easily.

Will I buy it again? Probably no, even if it were offered at the same price as regular roux.

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It is generally conceded that curry tastes better the next day. I tasted a spoonful yesterday, and I still thought it was bland. Today, we had the leftover curry for supper. I thought it wasn't bad. I don't know what happened to my taste buds. :biggrin:

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That particular product, the low-fat roux, seems to have cocoa powder in it already.
Have you tried adding a cup of coffee, chocolate to the curry?

Right, cocoa (ココア) is listed in the ingredients space on the box.

No, I haven't, although I know some people do add instant coffee and chocolate.

Here is a list of secret ingredients that some people add to curry, which I previuosly posted to the Japanese curry thread:

- Consomme

- Ginger

- Chocolate

- Instant coffee

- Tomato ketchup

- Apple, mango, and other fruits

- Honey

- Mayonnaise

- Worcestershire sauce

- Soy sauce

- Milk

- Garlic

- Laurel leaf

- Yogurt

- Wine

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  • 2 months later...

A display at the supermarket caught my eye yesterday, at first I was thinking it was a little early for white stew but upon closer inspection I realized this was:

WHITE CURRY

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curry with a cream cream sauce....

I just had to pick it up and will be trying it soon. Anyone else tried this?

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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A display at the supermarket caught my eye yesterday, at first I was thinking it was a little early for white stew but upon closer inspection I realized this was:

WHITE CURRY

gallery_6134_2590_45112.jpg

curry with a cream cream sauce....

I just had to pick it up and will be trying it soon. Anyone else tried this?

One of my students developed the original white curry a few years ago. He seemed to be really proud of it and mentioned that it was developed partially as a novelty item and partially to prevent curry stains on white shirts while eating your curry bento. I still havent tried it yet though. This guy is a curry proessional of the highest order so if anyone has any hard to answer curry questions let me know and I will ask him for you.

I'm curious to hear how it tastes...

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Isn't this essentially a curry-flavored cream stew (or cream stew with some curry spices, if you prefer)? Versions of which have been around forever?

Am I missing something here?

Baker of "impaired" cakes...
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This guy is a curry proessional of the highest order so if anyone has any hard to answer curry questions let me know and I will ask him for you.

I'd like to know a curry recipe that takes a whole week. The simpler the better.

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Isn't this essentially a curry-flavored cream stew (or cream stew with some curry spices, if you prefer)? Versions of which have been around forever?

Am I missing something here?

No it is not a "new" curry at all, it is just the first time it has been available in the roux form.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I must have misunderstood my student. maybe he developed the white curry for his particular company?

On the other end of the spectrum is black curry. CocoIchi is seving a black curry right now but I have never tried it. I think it is made black with squid ink?

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I must have misunderstood my student. maybe he developed the white curry for his particular company?

On the other end of the spectrum is black curry. CocoIchi is seving a black curry right now but I have never tried it. I think it is made black with squid ink?

I didn't know about black curry. I googled and found that their black curry contains squid ink.

from here:

http://www.ichibanya.co.jp/menu/gentei2.html

But there are other versions of black curry like this one:

"Shounan" black curry of Glico

http://www.ezaki-glico.net/yokohama/product2.html

This one uses black sesame seeds.

Neither of them look very appetizing to me. :sad:

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  • 1 month later...

I'm too lazy to search back through this thread but have we ever talked about dry curry (ドライカレー)?

This is just what it sounds like, a curry with no sauce. I have seen it served so it has a slight sauce like a meat sauce for pasta, or almost completely dry. I have also sometimes seen a curry flavored fried rice/pilaf style rice called dry curry.

I made a dry curry a couple night ago.

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I have never seen chickpeas in a Japanese curry but I needed to bulk it up and they go well with the flavor.

Most recipes are very similar, you saute the veggies (usually some of the following: onions, carrots, celery, green peppers, etc) add the ground meat and then season with curry powder or curry roux, ketchup or canned tomatoes and maybe some other seaonings like Worcestershire sauce. Cook until it is the consistancy you want. I added shishito at the end with the chickpeas to make it feel like I had more vegetables in my meal. :biggrin:

here is an example and another one.

this is an example of the rice version.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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There are times when I am tired of meat. Chickpeas and lentils are great with Japanese curry; fast and easy.

I have tried adding a can of coconut milk to the curry but not a good as I thought it would be. Better stick with the Madras curry if coconut flavor is added.

Leave the gun, take the canoli

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I have also sometimes seen a curry flavored fried rice/pilaf style rice called dry curry.

That's how my mom always makes her version of fried rice. Until she was able to find S&B curry powder, she used the American curry powders (such as Durkee) which added a weird green tint to the dish. Still very, very delicious :rolleyes:

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Kris, what has happened to your "Hokkaido White Curry"? :biggrin:

Did I never report back about that??

It was quite good, my kids really liked it and my oldest keeps asking me to buy it again. I will wait until it comes down in price a bit though...

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I attempted to make curry roux from scratch today. I actually created something really close to "curry shop curry" on my first try. Here is my method:

1 onion

1 carrot

6 cloves garlic

1 thumb sized piece of ginger

300 ml stock (I used beef)

2 tbs tomato paste

5 tablespoons curry powder (I used homemade)

1/3 c flour

1/3 c lard

additional meat and vegetables for the "actual" curry.

In a blender blend the onion, carrot, garlic, ginger, tomato paste, and stock into a fine puree. heat a tablespoon of lard in a high sided pot to the smoking point and then pour the puree in. Stir continuously. The liquid will evaporate and a sort of paste will form at the bottom and start to become dry after 30-40 minutes. after a certain point the paste will begin to stick to the bottom and caramelize. use small amounts of water to deglaze the pan and incorporate the caramelized bits into the paste. Repeat this for 20 minutes or until the paste has darkened and it has the flavor of caramelized onions but does not smell or taste burnt. at this point add the curry powder and mix until incorporated. deglaze a final time and set the paste aside.

Now make the roux: melt the lard in a pan and add the flour. cook on a medium low flame until the roux reaches the "blonde" or "dirty blonde" stage. Once the roux reaches that stage add the paste back into the pan and combine the roux and paste. cook the mixture for 5 minutes and set aside. This is now your "boxed curry roux" substitute.

I then boiled beef in a large volume of water (in this case I used beef tendon which added great body to the finished curry). After the water came to a boil I added my prepared curry paste and simmered the whole thing for about an hour and a half. The liquid thickened and reduced in volume by about half. The meat juices and gelatin added the necessary sweetness and body. At the very end I added salt to taste. Hopefully I will have some time to experiment with this more in the future. Any input would be appreciated.

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I have tried adding a can of coconut milk to the curry but not a good as I thought it would be. Better stick with the Madras curry if coconut flavor is added.

Hmm. This very situation happened to me last night when I got to the potato-carrot-chicken cooking stage of the curry, which I always do separately, before adding the pre-cooked roux based sauce - is this the correct way? I have no idea, since I first encountered Japanese curry mixes in Korea - where the directions were in Korean and Japanese, but not English.

Er, long story short, I went to get the box of roux to make up when I found that I'd purchased the Korean Ottogi brand instant curry mix by mistake.

Yikes.

So I dumped it oven the sauteeing mix anyway, and cheated the whole thing with a half a can of coconut milk and some curry powder I had kicking around in the cupboard. I dropped in a couple of spoons of honey, to get that "Vermont" brand taste. It was okay, but nowhere near what I wanted. I'll have to hit my local curry shop sometime this week to get a fix.

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