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Dinner 2015 (Part 3)


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I use TJ's  Monterey Jack

 

as Im from the area.

 

but Ill add some cheddar from TJ's from now on.

 

Of douse, they have 'Brie' and Camembert  ( properly aged for a few days on the counter ) might be nice !

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ninagluck, I'm intrigued by the brioche-encrusted egg yolk. How did you achieve that?

 

Shelby, marvelous enchiladas. I'm about due some enchiladas, myself. May have to do that this weekend.

 

Not doing much cooking this week, as a grandchild is here. Lots of takeout and kid-friendly stuff. Fortunately, she likes fruit and cheese and olives. And, I have now discovered, Momofuku soy sauce eggs.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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kayb, first I baked a brioche, crumbled it and let it dry ;-) with egg yolks, I do following: take an eggcup, line it with cling film., crack in the yolk, twist the cling film tightly, freeze. once frozen, remove the cling film and roll in flour, beaten egg, brioche crumbs. put back into the eggs and into crums to receive a more stable crust.. deep fry and enjoy

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Lovely looking meals and interesting techniques being shared!

More eggplants but this time baby ones stuffed with eggplant/onion/a little cauliflower; rehydrated tomatoes; basil; and topped with cheese.  Picture is before cheese and tomato sauce.

Convection spatchcocked game hen, done at 375 for a surprisingly short time of 15 minutes.  Herb butter under the skin.  Along with above eggplants and spinach spatzle.

Sous Vide pork chops done at 135 F for one hour and they were overdone!  Next time 132F for an hour.  They were pretty lean.  More spaztle and fiddle heads.  Two green sides, yikes.DSC00868.JPGDSC00869.JPGDSC00871.JPG

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The sous vide steak (56°C for two hours) was everything I hoped it would be but the real revelation on this plate is the potatoes. These are supermarket quality yellow potatoes (apparently unworthy of being called Yukon golds) that were cooked sous vide for 45 minutes at 83°C. There was a little duck fat in there with them. They were then crisped in a cast iron skillet with a little more duck fat. The interior was so smooth and creamy that I must repeat the experiment tomorrow to be sure that I was not imagining that texture! Perhaps I had one too many glasses of wine tonight.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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Yes, they come out crispy. I slice the lemons paper thin (usually a mandoline works best, but I did not care to bother) then sprinkle very lightly with caster sugar and place between two silpats to keep them flat and dehydrate in my convection oven (don't have a dehydrator) at around 170F for a few hours. They add a really nice concentrated touch of acidity. Works great with any fish, I'd imagine.

I appreciate it. I really have not made a conscious decision to forgo meat, it just seems to be the natural progression of my palate, favoring fresh vegetables and seafood to all else. I do still love a roasted chicken, pigeon or sweetbreads, on occasion. I can't really seem to digest red meat like I used to, so typically I avoid it.

The sugar dusting on the lemon wedges is a clever idea.I am going to give these a try tomorrow. Thank you for sharing.

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My local market had choice Angus Tri-Tip from Harris Ranch on sale for $4.99/lb so I bought 4.  Just me tonight and I didn't want to make a whole tri-tip.  I have seen tri-tip steaks so I cut some up into steaks and made one.  Seasoned with McCormick's Montreal Steak Rub.  Wow!  Served with sweet white corn on the cob and leftover potato salad from Memorial Day.  And a nice Malbec!

 

tri-tip-steak.jpg

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Mark

My eG Food Blog

www.markiscooking.com

My T shirt site: Guy Bling

My NEW Ribs site: BlasphemyRibs.com

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The sous vide steak (56°C for two hours) was everything I hoped it would be but the real revelation on this plate is the potatoes. These are supermarket quality yellow potatoes (apparently unworthy of being called Yukon golds) that were cooked sous vide for 45 minutes at 83°C. There was a little duck fat in there with them. They were then crisped in a cast iron skillet with a little more duck fat. The interior was so smooth and creamy that I must repeat the experiment tomorrow to be sure that I was not imagining that texture! Perhaps I had one too many glasses of wine tonight.

 

Anna, how did you do your sear?  On the steak, that is.

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My local market had choice Angus Tri-Tip from Harris Ranch on sale for $4.99/lb so I bought 4.  Just me tonight and I didn't want to make a whole tri-tip.  I have seen tri-tip steaks so I cut some up into steaks and made one.  Seasoned with McCormick's Montreal Steak Rub.  Wow!  Served with sweet white corn on the cob and leftover potato salad from Memorial Day.  And a nice Malbec!

 

attachicon.giftri-tip-steak.jpg

 

Lovely as that is, the corn in the picture looks like yellow corn?

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Anna, how did you do your sear?  On the steak, that is.

Hot cast iron skillet. Almost useless stove fan on full blast and broom in hand to shut off smoke alarm.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Did a pork loin 138 for 2 hours then chilled and sliced. Rubbed it with salt, pepper, and ground espresso then seared it on the cast iron. Served with black bean puree, corn relish, scallion yogurt, microgreen salad, pickled cabbage, arugula oil, and yellowbird hot sauce.

 

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Various stuff from yesterday.

 

Eggs, with Kikkoman soy sauce & ground white pepper.  Partly drunk (bowl to lips), partly spooned.

DSCN4978a_600.jpg

 

Cubano Especial & black bean soup, from here – leftovers taken home shown, a few damp condensation patches seen on the Cubano bread.  The bread was the real deal, the type needed for a Cubano, and perfectly crisped and ironed in their plancha press.  I chatted w/ the owner and he said they got it from a supplier in South Carolina although they are considering making their own in the future - maybe. The meats and fillings were nicely done and the sandwich had a good yielding (right through) bite and crunch.  He generously topped up the soup for me to take home. He also gregariously gave everyone in the (small) shop a shot of excellent Cuban coffee on the house, I guess he just felt like it at the moment, lucky me.

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The leftover Cubano piece; with chiffonaded young kale & small spinach leaves & heads (many flowering) in chicken broth w/ additional chicken fat rendered in situ in the soup.

DSCN4985a_800.jpg

 

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Ranz, you have me thinking now about brai. Here. Soon.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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I have been making Taiwanese (style) food using 2 or 3 different Taiwanese cookery books.

 

From today:

 

- Hand-pull chicken over rice (I used pink "peppercorns" for contrast. In Taiwan they just use standard ground black or white pepper)

 

- Sponge gourd and clam soup. (was delicious. I could add some mung bean nooodles next time and make it a soup meal on its own)

 

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Tonight's blue plate special. I opted to share my gifted lamb chops with my number two son. They were cooked sous vide at 56°C for two hours. Potatoes cooked sous vide at 83°C for 45 minutes and then roasted in the oven at 450°F until crispy. Frozen corn and peas because that's what my son likes.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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