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Dinner 2015 (Part 3)


kayb
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not tasting this, nor wanting to get into this zoo much

 

The first steak you posted was 'nice'  but that's what they may want on their web site for you to see or send to an Eg member

 

If these taste OK, well then OK

 

but if you paid what you suggested

 

Id take some pics  send them to L's and suggest

 

a ) they made a mistake on your order

 

2 ) or something much worse

 

the internet might be your friend here if you want to """ politely """ take the time to

 

make your case

 

sorry this happened.

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I certainly agree that those don't look like I would expect from them. I've seen much better looking meat at several local places including The Fresh Market. Of course if you mentioned originally, looks isn't everything, the bottom line will be how do they taste and how tender are they. Please report back when you have those answers.

I've learned that artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

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something is still wrong here   tasty as these might be

 

I sure hope L's didn't do a bait and switch for you

 

no matter how they taste.

 

for that kind of money  you should be getting a much better day

 

just saying

 

best of luck

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Here are the steaks. The porterhouse has salt and pepper on it, so it may be more difficult to see, but I think you can see the clear thick striations throughout the strip portion that I fear will be tough. There's even a thin one that hugs the bone. 

 

As for the ribeye, it looks... fine. If this is what I saw a local butcher I would be satisfied, but this is supposed to be the creme de la creme. I certainly wouldn't think this was the "top 2%" of prime steaks, as Lobel's advertises. Simply by visual inspection, I would not think the ribeye here compares to the beauty posted above. Perhaps looks aren't everything. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unfortunately the porterhouse is probably not going to be the best. That's the cut from the end of the sirloin(I believe near the hip). It's usually pretty tough.

 

ETA: That usually happens on the porterhouse instead of t-bone because that end has the larger fillet piece. I heard somewhere that most sides of beef have only 2-3 quality porterhouses on them.

Edited by jvalentino (log)
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That steak is from the more caudal end and thus the "strip" portion has a smaller longissimus portion and more other muscles. Between the muscles will be thin facial membranes (that will be tough) but the larger "lines" you see are still just fat.

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Dinner tonight was kielbasa, noodles w/ gravy, Brussels sprouts and kraut:

med_gallery_3331_114_101724.jpg

We must be the only people who like straight up SOURkraut!  Everyone I know buys the kind in the bag or jar and simmers it with something to ‘tame’ the zing.  We like the canned kind – cold or hot – the picklier, the better!

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image.jpg

SV'd baby potatoes, reheated formerly SV'd duck leg and some frozen pearl onions which I was going to glaze with marmalade but when I opened the fridge door the lingonberry sauce was front and centre and turned out to be a good option.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Those steaks look like select grade with a stint in the feedlot for fattening, Thick bands of fat but little marbling. Low quality.

 

1dQrXzjl.jpg

 

I never buy meat sight unseen. Especially steaks. Too late now but I'd have returned the meat, especially what you paid for them.

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Morkai,

 

At upwards of $48 a pound, I am very sorry to hear that you got anything less than manna from Heaven beef.

 

Still, If these steaks were in my larder, I'd cook them like I usually do a nice (much cheaper) thick steak. That is with with salt and freshly ground pepper as the only adulterations, and grill them over hot charcoal. If I couldn't manage that, I'd at least grill them on a gas grill over high flame. It's a waste of a good and expensive ingredient to me any other way. Some folks are satisfied with a steak seared in a hot cast iron pan, but I'm not one of them. They are a little better under the broiler, but still no cigar to me. 

 

That's just my taste though, and thankfully, my husband shares it. He's from Pittsburgh, and we both like our steaks, guess what? Pittsburgh!

 

That means a thick, good steak, with a very blackened, charred crust, but very, very rare but warm inside. In order to cook thick steaks Pittsburgh properly, it's necessary to turn them on their thinner sides, especially the fat cap sides, with tongs and get a good char there too. The thickest steaks will stand on their own without tong support on the thin side.

 

You need a screechin' hot fire to do this. There actually is very minimal grey under the blackened crust when the fire is hot enough and the steaks have been seasoned and set out of the fridge to marinate in salt and pepper, and come to room temp. It's also possible to get some of the effect with thinner steaks, but they must go into the freezer a while before grilling. Really thin 1/2" should be grilled from frozen solid to get anywhere near Pittsburgh. It only works with tender steaks. 

 

Few restaurants in the South know how to do this, so it's a much better value for me to cook steaks at home.

 

Of course everyone is entitled to cook (ruin  :smile:) their steaks just as they like, including my BIL who adores gray meat.  :blink:

 

 

For dinner and meals into the future I roasted a large chicken, perfectly cooked and very juicy, if I do say so myself. I took the meat off the bones, saved the drippings and froze them along with the bones for soup and/or gravy.

 

I am doing the best I can with what I've been dealt, but it's not up to par with usual yet. The husband demands meat, and he got it with leftover butter beans and a sliced chicken breast sandwich for tomorrow's lunch on hollowed out French bread with lettuce, tomato mayo and cheese. Coons got the scooped out bread, so no waste. There's also leftover veggie fried rice with eggs, so no one's going to starve around here anytime soon.

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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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It's becoming a weekly thing...

 

2015_06_19_319.JPG

 

Wild gulf shrimp and chicken. Shrimp stock combined with chicken stock for liquid.

 

Possibly best yet, except for lack of socarrat.  One of these days...

 

  • Like 12

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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Shelby,

 

All of it looks great, but for some reason, those egg rolls are captivating me. I like the darker fry on them. Crispity, crunchity! I sure would like one right now.

 

What are they stuffed with?

I use spring roll wraps which might be why they get a bit darker.  They are very crispity!  I make a huge batch and then vac. pack and freeze them.  So handy--pop 'em out of the freezer and right into the oil to fry.  I'm always sad when I run out--which is soon.  I did these with ground pork, a bit of shredded cabbage and carrot and shiitake mushrooms.  I'm sure I threw some fish sauce in along with cilantro and all the usual suspects.

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Mitch your paella looks fabulous. I can see where it's become a regular in the meal rotation.

I'm off to buy some large head on gulf shrimp from a company out of Tarpon Springs. Those heads and shells make some wonderful stock

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I don't drain or rinse sauerkraut either. Canned, jarred or bagged. I like it Bavarian style...

What is "Bavarian style" sauerkraut ? I know of Bavarian style cabbage, but that is specifically the non-acidic alternative to the fermented sauerkraut ...

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image.jpg

This had no business being as good as it was. Cherry tomatoes, somewhat past their peak of perfection, were roasted for an hour at 300°F. They were then tossed into a pan with a little butter and some cream and kept warm while I cooked pasta. The only seasoning was salt and pepper and a spring shower of grated Parmesan. The recipe is adapted from The Glorious Vegetables of Italy.

Quite sometime ago Kerry Beal came across some organic cream that was about to cross the river Styx. She was able to get it at an excellent price, gave it to me and I froze it flat in Ziploc bags. This is quite a wonderful bounty to have in one's freezer. I have had countless meals using broken off piece of frozen cream. Doubt it would ever whip but it works fine when cooked.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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