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John DePaula

EZtemper - The Help You Need to Achieve Perfectly Tempered Chocolate FAST!

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Where do you put your molds to rest before going in the fridge?

Do you leave them on the marble? If so, try putting them on a wire rack and force some air circulation with a fan. Big blocks like that have lots of troubles due to the latent heat of crystalization, especially with that indented shape.

 

 

 

Teo

 


Teo

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7 minutes ago, teonzo said:

Where do you put your molds to rest before going in the fridge?

Do you leave them on the marble? If so, try putting them on a wire rack and force some air circulation with a fan. Big blocks like that have lots of troubles due to the latent heat of crystalization, especially with that indented shape.

 

 

 

Teo

 

After filling, they go into the vibrating surface and immediately into the fridge

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3 hours ago, felipetruji said:

After filling, they go into the vibrating surface and immediately into the fridge

I usually wait until I see them starting to show signs of crystallizing around the edges before bunging them in the fridge. That is when they are most rapidly crystallizing the the latent heat will be the biggest issue.

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14 hours ago, felipetruji said:

After filling, they go into the vibrating surface and immediately into the fridge

 

You need to consider the geometry of the mold you are using and how to dissipate the heat.

Big molds (like this 1 kg block) mean big width, which means more latent heat to dissipate from the surface. Those squares are separated by deep and narrow interstices, you need to dissipate all the heat that accumulates on the surfaces of those interstices. Problem is that air is an insulator and that mold has a flat surface (the surface of the squares), so if you place the mold on a sheet pan then it's really really difficult for the air in those interstices to circulate. No air circulation means that there is a lot of latent heat accumulating there, causing the chocolate to bloom along those interstices (which is what your photo is showing).

So you need to place your molds on a wire rack and find a way to force air circulation. Usually a fan is a good and inexpensive solution. If you have an air conditioner then put the molds near it.

You need to be careful when and how putting them in the fridge. Putting the molds in the fridge can mean lots of different things. As Kerry wrote, it's better to avoid putting them in the fridge just after molding, you force quick crystalization on the surface while the inside is still fluid, which means when the inside will crystallize it's going to shrink, causing the surface of the chocolate piece to break. So you need to put them in the fridge at the correct time, but also in the correct way. If you place the molds on a flat surface you get the troubles I explained above, so you need to place them on a wire rack even in the fridge, with some space below them otherwise air will not circulate. You need a fridge with good air circulation inside it. You need to place them in the "warmest" side of the fridge.

Since you wrote you have a room at 19°C, then I would suggest to put the molds on wire racks with at least 2 inches of air beneath them, then using a fan near them to force air circulation. That temperature + wire racks + fan should be enough to avoid putting them in the fridge, but leave them alone for a good amount of time (many hours, if not a full day), don't take them out of the mold when they detach, the inside is still crystallizing.

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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Ok, so I started off with the intention of reading the entire thread looking for my answer, and pooped out somewhere around page 8. And that was before I noticed it was 25 pages long :)

 

So apologies if this has been asked. But just to clarify. With Silk from the EZTemper, I can heat my chocolate until all of the crystals are melted, not stir it at all (or only minimally) while it cools to 33.5 c, toss in some Silk, stir, and I'm good to go?

 

I've been seeding with tempered chocolate and stirring all the way to down to the "tempering" temperature and then bringing my chocolate back up to working temperature. It's like a 25 f degree temperature change. It takes days to cool down that far!  (Though now I've just read in Grewling's book that "it's not necessary to cool much below 32 c / 90 f when using the seeding method" and seed that's in temper.... knowing that sooner would have saved me some serious time.)

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58 minutes ago, cslas said:

Ok, so I started off with the intention of reading the entire thread looking for my answer, and pooped out somewhere around page 8. And that was before I noticed it was 25 pages long :)

 

So apologies if this has been asked. But just to clarify. With Silk from the EZTemper, I can heat my chocolate until all of the crystals are melted, not stir it at all (or only minimally) while it cools to 33.5 c, toss in some Silk, stir, and I'm good to go?

 

I've been seeding with tempered chocolate and stirring all the way to down to the "tempering" temperature and then bringing my chocolate back up to working temperature. It's like a 25 f degree temperature change. It takes days to cool down that far!  (Though now I've just read in Grewling's book that "it's not necessary to cool much below 32 c / 90 f when using the seeding method" and seed that's in temper.... knowing that sooner would have saved me some serious time.)

That would be correct - with the understanding that with the EZtemper you don't need to take it up to 45º or so initially - just enough above 33.5 to melt then drop it back down to that.

 

Right now you are overkill - you only need to seed down to the working temperature - you are combining two methods of tempering and you could save some time by stopping at the working temperature.

 

 

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@Kerry Beal so glad I know this before I do another set of molds tonight! Also, I scored a Mol d'art on Ebay yesterday so there might be an EZTemper in my future once I save up :)

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35 minutes ago, cslas said:

@Kerry Beal so glad I know this before I do another set of molds tonight! Also, I scored a Mol d'art on Ebay yesterday so there might be an EZTemper in my future once I save up :)

 

Save up with indecent haste, for you will have no regrets. None at all. I have acquired many things in my long life, but the EZTemper is, for me, one of my best ever purchases. It will be passed down to one of my grandsons/granddaughters when the grim reaper comes a callin' for me. For sure...

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3 hours ago, ptw1953 said:

 

Save up with indecent haste, for you will have no regrets. None at all. I have acquired many things in my long life, but the EZTemper is, for me, one of my best ever purchases. It will be passed down to one of my grandsons/granddaughters when the grim reaper comes a callin' for me. For sure...

 

I knew I had a long lost relative in Scotland, I'm so glad I found you! 🤣

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ER physician, chocolate wizard, AND production food science engineer?

I no longer feel as good about changing my own motor oil.

Are you actually six people in a trenchcoat?


Edited by jrshaul (log)
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32 minutes ago, jrshaul said:

ER physician, chocolate wizard, AND production food science engineer?

I no longer feel as good about changing my own motor oil.

Are you actually six people in a trenchcoat?

 

My days of changing my own motor oil are long gone. But I did take auto shop back in high school. Also long gone!

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I have a question about using EZTemper silk in larger quantities than recommended to temper a mass of chocolate. I'm looking at a recipe in Wybauw Fine Chocolates that asks for 50g cocoa butter to be added to 500g precrystallised white chocolate before the combination is then added to a coconut/coconut milk mixture. Is there a problem with adding 50g of silk to the chocolate once it has been melted and brought back down to the 33.5c recommended for tempering with silk? Just hoping to skip a step if it won't cause a problem to do so. 


Edited by BottleRocket (log)

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51 minutes ago, BottleRocket said:

I have a question about using EZTemper silk in larger quantities than recommended to temper a mass of chocolate. I'm looking at a recipe in Wybauw Fine Chocolates that asks for 50g cocoa butter to be added to 500g precrystallised white chocolate before the combination is then added to a coconut/coconut milk mixture. Is there a problem with adding 50g of silk to the chocolate once it has been melted and brought back down to the 33.5c recommended for tempering with silk? Just hoping to skip a step if it won't cause a problem to do so. 

 

Yup - it will overcrystallize - depending on the total weight - add melted cocoa butter to the white chocolate minus the 1% silk.

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13 hours ago, BottleRocket said:

Thank you. I wondered if that was a thing. Would adding melted CB be before or after adding the silk? 


Kerry is the better person to answer EZtemper questions but in situations like that, I usually just follow the recipe as written then add the 1% silk at the end. I don't even make adjustments to the cocoa butter which I realize means I'm adding a very small amount (proportionally) of extra cocoa butter in the form of silk. I figure we're adding that extra cocoa butter in every case because there's no other recipe adjustments for adding silk so I just don't worry about it and haven't noticed any negative effects from doing it. But like I said, when it comes to the EZtemper, I'd suggest going with what Kerry suggests. She knows the ins and outs of working with it more than anybody else.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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13 hours ago, BottleRocket said:

Thank you. I wondered if that was a thing. Would adding melted CB be before or after adding the silk? 

I’d say before.

But as Tri2Cook says - in the real world I'd add 50 grams and 1%
 

 

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