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Champagne Bonbon


jaroj
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Hello,

 

I'm attempting to create a bonbon filled with a champagne ganache, however my problem is that I want a ganache that can actually have some texture with some bubbles. I have tried mixing the ganache with bicarbonate to experiment but once I mix it into the ganache and mold after a while it starts to expand and cracks the shells. Anyone knows of how to obtain that bubbly effect??

 

jaroj

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Would pop rocks work for this purpose? You can buy unflavored pop rocks and fold them into the ganache.

Will try, however don't know if the moisture from the ganache will have any effect on the candy.

Thanks  

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Maybe a layer of champagne ganache and a layer of aerated chocolate?

Sounds interesting, however how would I incorporate the bubbly effect on the aerated chocolate so that at the moment you bite the bonbon it tingles in your mouth?? as you were drinking champagne??  

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Sounds interesting, however how would I incorporate the bubbly effect on the aerated chocolate so that at the moment you bite the bonbon it tingles in your mouth?? as you were drinking champagne??  

You probably wouldn't... so as it turns out, that probably wasn't a very good suggestion in this particular case.

 

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Sounds interesting, however how would I incorporate the bubbly effect on the aerated chocolate so that at the moment you bite the bonbon it tingles in your mouth?? as you were drinking champagne??

You might try CO2 charging a siphon of stabilized chocolate ganache and then piping it into a chocolate shell. From what I remember, it's the dissolved CO2 hitting the tongue that causes the fizzing sensation, not the bursting of bubbles (they did experiments where they got underwater divers to drink a soda and it still felt fizzy, despite there being no bubbling).

Also, pop rocks will work in a mildly moist environment. The outside is coated in a candy shell that will resist moisture until it's bit into.

Worth giving both of these a shot.

PS: I am a guy.

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Will try, however don't know if the moisture from the ganache will have any effect on the candy.

Thanks  

You can buy chocolate coated "pastry rocks" that will protect the candy until either the chocolate melts or you chew them.

Steve Lebowitz

Doer of All Things

Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

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