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Drinks! 2015 - 2016


EvergreenDan
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That sounds great. What ingredients did you use?

Punt e Mes, Pasquet, Millstone 100, Benedictine. Ango plus a 'small dash' each of Bitter Truth Creole and Peychaud's, as I was using Death and Co. specs.

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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Great garnish.

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DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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This is something I'm working on. I need to make the orange syrup more orangey and possibly bump the mescal up a touch.

 

Salt & Pepper Margarita

1 black pepper infused tequila

.5  mescal

.75 lime

.75 orange & jalapeno syrup

 

 

12092438_615020983671_1993013672_n.jpg?o

Excuse the terrible photo, I haven't found my camera charger since I moved house.

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Playing with my new yellow chartreuse tonight. Where else start with this bottle but a Widow's Kiss.This was a lovely, mild, autumnal herbal cocktail. Nothing earthshaking, but very pleasant. Then I tried an Auteur Cocktail from Bittermans website. This is a blockbusters. I can taste all the ingredients, and none of them. Very smooth, utterly complex, I could drink these all the time.

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Had a Diamondback using the original yellow chartreuse recipe (HW Double Rye, Lairds 100 proof brandy) at a bar where we were reviewing cocktails for an upcoming private whiskey dinner and really enjoyed it even though it is a bit sweet. Nice after dinner option with a bit less proof than with the green. The green variant is good as well but certainly different. I agree with reducing the yellow chartreuse a bit to keep the sweetness down.

 

Interesting bit of history on the cocktail here.

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If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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A few Matthew Webb Gimlets:

2 oz Tanqueray

3/4 oz Lime Juice

1/2 oz Plymouth Sloe Gin

1/2 oz Yellow Chartreuse (I used MOFS)

1/4 oz Simple Syrup

Shake with ice, strain into a chilled coupe, and top with 4 drops Angostura.

Thus fortified, one might (theoretically) swim the English Channel.

I tried this over the weekend with my new bottle of yellow chartreuse.  Tasty and pretty:

shortgimlet.jpg

 

But it was really hot outside so I poured it into a tall glass over ice and topped it with some sparkling water.  Tasty, pretty and refreshing:

tallgimlet.jpg

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There are more yellow Chartreuse ideas in the Chartreuse thread amongst others. I like the Daisy de Santiago and the Chien Chaud that pair it with rum, the Alaska that pairs it wth gin, Death & Co's Coin Toss, the Greenpoint which is a killer Manhattan variation, The Naked and Famous with mezcal, the Norwegian Wood with aquavit and applejack, etc, etc...

Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)
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I tried a bit of the new 70-proof Cynar yesterday. It tastes, well, like Cynar, with more forward alcohol and a bit less perceptible sweetness (while the proof went up, the rest of the recipe, including the amount of sugar, is untouched, the Campari rep told me). It will make a good base for drinks, but I suspect most of it will end up going into shots. 

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DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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image.jpg1_zpsm8bu5eu5.jpg

Fancy Free. Death specs.

image.jpg2_zpsb3fkzt5c.jpg

An unnamed experiment: a julep based on equal parts and rapadura syrup. I think the sweetener clashed with the spirits. Rethinking the garnish, too.

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Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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image.jpg1_zpsxthpfvcc.jpg

A rare original. WIP. Darkness at Pegu. Lighter, sweeter, needs a gutsier gin.

1.5oz gin (Four Pillars), .75oz blood orange liqueur, .75oz ruby grapefruit juice, 2 dashes of Angostura. Shake. Campari-rinsed coupe.

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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  • 2 weeks later...

Tried out a Louanalao and it was delicious! Muddled strawberry, Plantation 3-star rum, Campari, homemade allspice dram, lime juice, cane syrup, garnished with orange and strawberry. My strawberry garnish was too sad to photograph, but this was a yummy crowd-pleaser. Grapefruit flavors from the Campari and citrus, nice cinnamon/clove spice from the dram.

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I picked up a bottle of the St. George Raspberry Brandy. It's really funky in the nose, a little briny tasting, the raspberry flavor and aroma is there but marries nicely with the other flavors going on, it should lead to some interesting experiments. Because of that funk I thought it might pair nicely with Wray and Nephew and tried this Sidecar riff out.

 

1.5 oz St. George Raspberry Brandy

.5 oz W&N

.75 oz lemon

.75 oz PF Dry Curacao

teaspoon of raspberry jam

2 drops of salt

 

Shake/strain/coupe

 

I liked this, the touch of jam helped bring out the raspberry flavor that might have been lost otherwise. When the drink was ice cold it seemed almost a touch too dry, but as it warmed up the subtle sweetness crept in to balance it all out. Anywhere between a teaspoon and a 1/4 oz of 1:1 simple wouldn't be a bad addition, depending on your tastes.

Edited by sbumgarner (log)
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1 oz Ango

1 oz rye

1 oz simple

1 dash absinthe

Orange twist

Awesome. I think this would work well as a flip with a nutmeg garnish—even with an equal part of simple, the ango is pretty astringent, though the twist and absinthe help a lot with that.

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DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Another one of our man Rafa's last night - the Werewolf of London:

 

Werewolf.jpg

 

Aquavit, Gran Classico, mezcal and Amontillado sherry with a lemon twist.  About as far as you can get from a pina colada at Trader Vic's, but unusual and delicious.

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Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

My eG Foodblog

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GWAR Williams

 

1 oz Poire Williams

1/2 oz Ardbeg

1/2 oz Sorel liqueur

1/2 oz Lemon juice

1/2 oz Rosemary syrup

1 1/2 oz Pear cider

1 pinch Nutmeg (as garnish)

 

Sometimes you come up with a name before the rest of the drink. Sometimes the drink even works. 

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DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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