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EvergreenDan

Drinks! 2015 - 2016

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Give it a lemon twist.


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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To honor Dick Bradsell, a variation on the Bramble with Tanqueray London dry gin, lemon juice, Briottet blackcurrant syrup, demerara syrup.

 

25066601070_38a4498f64_h.jpg

 

 

 

 


Edited by FrogPrincesse Attempt to fix picture link (log)
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Work in progress. Dark rum blend, dark sherry blend, ginger, demerara, spice blend, mole bitters, lime. Progressing very nicely.

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DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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At the moment, just my usual white mai tai, of course.

 

However last night was a blind Scotch tasting (and Japanese whiskey tasting) at my son's.  My favorite was an old Ardbeg that had been a present from his brother.  Next favored was a Japanese whiskey though I can't recall the name.  Their Caledonian alcotourism focuses mostly on whiskey.  Mine more so on ale.  (Though the last time I visited Scotland was [almost] forty five years ago.)

 

My grandson expressed interest in visiting Japan, so perhaps I may get there yet.  My granddaughter leaves for China in a couple weeks.  Not sure what the beverage situation is like there.  Perchance I shall hear a report.

 


Edited by JoNorvelleWalker arithmetic (log)
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More research.

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DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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are these individual bottles?

how do you proceed? Are these pre-diluted? I guess they are but how do you proceed? Stirred with ice and and strain into those bottles or do you simply add water and cool is in a fridge/freezer?

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Prediluted and pre-chilled, ready to drink straight from the flask, in some cases with a twist (lemon for the Widow's Kiss and our bottled Old Fashioneds; orange for Señor Presidente). These are individually sized (100ml). The Corn 'n Oil was my favorite and drank great from the bottle, but I think I might serve it instead on the rock with a pinch of nutmeg.


Edited by Rafa (log)

DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Dank rum old fashioned, i.e. my Corn 'n Oil recipe with a couple of dashes of bitters: 1/2 oz each of Denizen Merchant's Reserve, Smith & Cross, Cruzan Blackstrap molasses vodka, Novo Fogo aged cachaça, and house falernum, with Angostura bitters and a pinch of nutmeg.

image.jpeg


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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I presume the "Cruzan Blackstrap molasses vodka" requires a touch of sarcafont? Or is this now a "thing"?


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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I admit to some snark, but I also think that's a more accurate description of the product. (Which I enjoy and extensively employ.) 


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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1/2 oz each of Denizen Merchant's Reserve, Smith & Cross, Cruzan Blackstrap molasses vodka, Novo Fogo aged cachaça, and house falernum, with Angostura bitters and a pinch of nutmeg.

 

Rafa, make me one of those and send it over.  Put it on my tab, OK?

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Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

My eG Foodblog

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West Indies by Julien Escot 

50ml Havana 3

20ml lime juice 

20ml vanilla syrup

5ml pimento dram

2 dashes of Creole Bitters (I used Peychaud's instead) 

1 dash of egg white

 

A very nice daiquiri variation 

 

 

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On 2/28/2016 at 2:59 PM, FrogPrincesse said:

How was it? Or are you taking a nap now maybe? :D

Still not my favorite, but certainly an improvement.


Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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1 oz PF 1840 Cognac

.5 oz Smith & Cross

.5oz Cynar 70

.75 oz lime

.5 1:1 simple

one  1" x 1" pineapple cube

dash of Burlesque Bitters

pinch of salt

 

Shake, double strain over a big rock in a double old-fashioned.

 

I liked this in general. I think next time I'd try making some pineapple shrub and using a little in place of the pineapple to get the pineapple flavor while adding some extra acidity. A scrape of nutmeg probably wouldn't hurt either.

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On ‎3‎/‎2‎/‎2016 at 9:30 AM, sbumgarner said:

1 oz PF 1840 Cognac

.5 oz Smith & Cross

.5oz Cynar 70

.75 oz lime

.5 1:1 simple

one  1" x 1" pineapple cube

dash of Burlesque Bitters

pinch of salt

 

Shake, double strain over a big rock in a double old-fashioned.

 

I liked this in general. I think next time I'd try making some pineapple shrub and using a little in place of the pineapple to get the pineapple flavor while adding some extra acidity. A scrape of nutmeg probably wouldn't hurt either.

 

Perhaps a place for a bit of the indubitable Stiggins rum?


Edited by tanstaafl2 (log)

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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I love spectating this thread. 

 

Cocktails are not my thing. 

 

Can anyone shed light on what's going on in the video here? (You can safely turn the sound off and it's fairly annoying). I am assuming relative densities but I am wondering what she is likely to be making?

 

 

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there are rainbow shots tuto on youtube

basically, you start with some grenadine syrup, add orange juice, vodka/gin and finish with blue curacao

 

it looks impressive but it is not that hard to do.
The only thing you need to know is that it is disgusting :ph34r: Since nothing is mixed, every shooter is different

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I did wonder if it was likely to be disgusting!

 

Thanks :)


Edited by Tere (log)

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15 hours ago, tanstaafl2 said:

 

Perhaps a place for a bit of the indubitable Stiggins rum?

 

I haven't picked up a bottle of that yet but that's a great idea, might have to seek one out.

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The Dare I Say Cocktail: Rye, Fernet Branca, sweet vermouth, Aperol, rhubarb bitters (cranberry orange bitters).

 

As in another recent Rittenhouse/amaro combo, I'm again tasting peanut butter. Actually, what I get with this one is the "peanut butter and jelly" combo of Jelly Belly jelly beans I remember from my childhood (to which the candyish Aperol no doubt contributed).

 

I was intrigued with the thought of Aperol and fernet, but the many things going on in this drink didn't quite resolve as satisfactorily as I'd hoped.

IMG_1917.jpg

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On March 5, 2016 at 3:25 PM, Craig E said:

The Dare I Say Cocktail: Rye, Fernet Branca, sweet vermouth, Aperol, rhubarb bitters (cranberry orange bitters).

 

As in another recent Rittenhouse/amaro combo, I'm again tasting peanut butter. Actually, what I get with this one is the "peanut butter and jelly" combo of Jelly Belly jelly beans I remember from my childhood (to which the candyish Aperol no doubt contributed).

 

I was intrigued with the thought of Aperol and fernet, but the many things going on in this drink didn't quite resolve as satisfactorily as I'd hoped.

IMG_1917.jpg

 

It'd be probably better with Campari... Like an Old Pal/Left Hand variation.

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