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EvergreenDan

Drinks! 2015 - 2016

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In that one, which is the Potions of the Caribbean recipe, no. I've since made a couple with, and I'm not sure which version I like more.

 

Perhaps my favorite was one that was briefly barrel aged. I don't know what their recipe was but I suspect it was without grenadine, In any case it is one I have been meaning to try to age but haven't gotten around to it. Always thought the Blanc vermouth would be a bit fragile but only one way to find out I suppose.

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I also first read about it from David Wondrich I think, tried it at the time and didn't care for it. Tried it again at Bar Agricole a couple of years ago and still didn't get what the fuss was about (here is their version below in the front, and a little write-up about how the drink represents their philosophy about ingredient sourcing). Wayne Curtis previously wrote about this cocktail in 2006.

 

Maybe it's time to revisit, although I have a fear of grenadine.

 

 

At a mere 1/2 barspoon (what is that, 2.5 ml at most from a typical barspoon anyway?) you can likely skip the grenadine of you must!

 

I think the real revelation, at least as the Professor described it and  that differs from the Wayne Curtis description, is the blanc vermouth as versus a standard dry vermouth. And just how fresh was the vermouth in a hole in the wall in Cuba a decade ago anyway? Questionable at best I should guess! Wasn't all that good when I was there just a couple of years ago!

 

In any case give it another chance! Get a fresh 1/2 bottle of Dolin Blanc, a nice white rum (I still suggest the Flor de Cana 4yo Extra Dry but a nice aged dark rum will likely do) and see what happens. :biggrin:

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The original recipe specifies "Vermouth de Chambery" rather than "francés" or "seco," as is specified elsewhere in the same book, which is what leads Wondrich, Berry, etc. to assert that the proper vermouth is probably Dolin Blanc (or similar). At any rate, the blanc style makes the better drink. The authors call for 1-2 barspoons of either curaçao or grenadine, which indicates to me that the small amount of sweetener serves to 1) sweeten the drink further while adding a bit of flavor complexity, 2) dye the drink red (curaçaos were more often red—or green, as well as the usual orange, clear, and blue—back then). I prefer a dry orange liqueur in mine and don't see the point of having both options, but to each his bliss. As far as vermouth storage, Havana's bars in the 20s (and well into the 40s) were among the most sophisticated and successful in the hemisphere, as evidenced by the wide array of international ingredients and the mixological know-how called for by these old recipes. I'm sure they knew from proper wine maintenance.

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The original recipe specifies "Vermouth de Chambery" rather than "francés" or "seco," as is specified elsewhere in the same book, which is what leads Wondrich, Berry, etc. to assert that the proper vermouth is probably Dolin Blanc (or similar). At any rate, the blanc style makes the better drink. The authors call for 1-2 barspoons of either curaçao or grenadine, which indicates to me that the small amount of sweetener serves to 1) sweeten the drink further while adding a bit of flavor complexity, 2) dye the drink red (curaçaos were more often red—or green, as well as the usual orange, clear, and blue—back then). I prefer a dry orange liqueur in mine and don't see the point of having both options, but to each his bliss. As far as vermouth storage, Havana's bars in the 20s (and well into the 40s) were among the most sophisticated and successful in the hemisphere, as evidenced by the wide array of international ingredients and the mixological know-how called for by these old recipes. I'm sure they knew from proper wine maintenance.

 

Preach!

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Wednesday I got a hankering for something different and decided on (of all things) a Long Island Iced Tea.

I used just  half ounce each (lest I fall over afterward) of tequila, gin, rum, vodka, triple sec, lemon juice as well as 1 tsp. superfine sugar and about 4 to 5 ozs. of Coke.   It was really tasty!

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As far as vermouth storage, Havana's bars in the 20s (and well into the 40s) were among the most sophisticated and successful in the hemisphere, as evidenced by the wide array of international ingredients and the mixological know-how called for by these old recipes. I'm sure they knew from proper wine maintenance.

 

Don't doubt the sophistication of Havana bars in the heyday of Cuba as America's prohibition and post prohibition playground. Cuba in the mid 2000's after the collapse of the Soviet Union is a more than just as little bit of a wildcard and based on my experience of Cuba in 2013, when things had started to pick up again at least a little bit with the arrival of European and Canadian tourists, I was more than a little underwhelmed.

 

No doubt some bars are still doing it the right away but I don't think the odds of finding one at random now or in the past decade or two were not necessarily in your favor (the quality of the "Mai Tai" Wayne Curtis described in his article being a case in point!). Perhaps he knew where he was going and it was a quality locale but not every tourist is likely to have the same cocktail acumen!


Edited by tanstaafl2 (log)

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Continuing the Cuban theme, this arrived today:

 

11745548_10100398254486981_2324499332346

 

So I made my first ever Daiquiri No. 2:

 

11219383_10100398261028871_4860496002781

 

2 oz Bacardi Heritage (this stuff is fucking gold)

1/2 oz key lime (wow, such synergy, much taste, very magic!...seriously, it plays like a champ with the bacardi)

CK barspoon cara cara orange juice (because of all of FP's praises of them...agreed!)

CK barspoon superfine sugar

"a few dashes" curaçao aka Clément Creole Shrubb

 

shaken with cracked ice, per the specs in the book.

 

Nom. Nom. Nom.

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Our entry for the MxMo XCIX, to whit 'ice, ice, baby' and coming late to the Mixology Monday party, we've worked up a second iteration of a cocktail we've been perfecting (drinking a lot) over the past few days. It's an Anise-based cocktail, and we're not sure what the perception is in other parts of the world, but if you mention Ouzo, Raki, Arak et al over here, people usually bring up negative connotations of holidays on the Med, or the dread sambuca shot experience. We hope that these noble drinks can be rehabilitated, at least to a limited extent, and offer up the following with that aim in mind. 

 

In a Gadda Da Vida

1.5oz Ouzo by Metaxa

1oz Efe Raki

1.5oz Calvados 

6oz freshly squeezed ruby red grapefruit juice

1oz lemon juice

1 teaspoon pomegranate molasses

1 teaspoon honey

few drops underberg

dash(es) bitters, we used nettle for this one but personal preference is fine

 

For the method we add all ingredients into a measuring jug, stir well, until all molasses/honey is dissolved then hard shake with lots of ice (3/4 full shaker) for 5 seconds and pour into serving glass, which has been garnished with a grapefruit peel snake, fixed to a baby apple (swiped from a tree in the local park where i walk my dog) with cloves, cunningly doubling as the serpent's dispassionate eyes. that gets draped into a glass and then the ice apple slices are added (i got about 3 in each time). for the apple i took a chunk of carving ice that i had in the freezer, sawed it roughly to size, then hacked away at it until it was vaguely apple shaped, then sent that through the bandsaw to get the smooth edges on the apple slivers.

 

The molasses (i'm assuming) can be bought from any middle eastern supermarket, thats where i got mine. Sharp-eyed readers may see that the molasses shown is mulberry, but i tasted that one and it seemed too sweet and one-dimensional, the pomegranate version has a real zing to it, a fantastic umami quality, so i used that one instead.

 

CK20GNeWsAA1o54.jpg

 

The garnish is pretty ropey, but proficiency in that is hard, like really hard. No wonder some bars just have people making that stuff all day and night.

 

Some tasting notes? well, although the aniseed is still there (kinda), it's throttled right back into a more sharp/savoury/sweet note with plenty of complexity. Personally i like it, and the feedback from my housemates has been positive. 

 

The reason i used a mix of raki and ouzo was simply that i tried it with both, and like the 45% raki for some things, and the very good metaxa ouzo  (38%) for others, so i opted for a blend. i guess either one will deliver a very similar result, though cleary not identical. 

 

i sieve and strain all the citrus juice, one of my pet hates is getting a clod of grapefruit (A N other material) stuck up my straw whilst drinking.

 

Chose the ice apple slivers as from my point of view - and this may or may not be contentious - (up drinks the exception), dilution should be commensurate to alcohol content. There's plenty of dilution with the grapefruit juice, so the big chunks of ice will keep the drink cool (after the shake) whilst not diluting too quickly. Plus, they kind of fit the imagery and connotation i was going for with the drink.

 

Thanks for reading, and if any of you make a version, i'd love to hear your thoughts!

 

mxmologo.gif

 

http://mixologymonday.com/

 

http://feu-de-vie.blogspot.co.uk/


Edited by ice3mcr (log)
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I shared some Honesty with a few friends who commented on how evocative it was of grappa...not surprising, given the methods involved (it's basically pear pommace brandy). So, I busted out an old favorite grappa cocktail, which for the life of me doesn't appear to exist on the Internet (it was an original 'Rogue' cocktail, that didn't survive the transition to Beta):

 

Clocka (Troy Sidle)

 

2 oz Unaged Grappa

1/4 oz Honey Syrup (1:1)

3 Dashes Orange Bitters

 

Stir, strain over fresh ice and garnish with a mint sprig & one drop of rose water.

 

CLDea7zWwAA_iZ0.jpg

 

On paper, it looks like an old-fashioned, but looks can be deceiving.

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Don't doubt the sophistication of Havana bars in the heyday of Cuba as America's prohibition and post prohibition playground. Cuba in the mid 2000's after the collapse of the Soviet Union is a more than just as little bit of a wildcard and based on my experience of Cuba in 2013, when things had started to pick up again at least a little bit with the arrival of European and Canadian tourists, I was more than a little underwhelmed.

 

No doubt some bars are still doing it the right away but I don't think the odds of finding one at random now or in the past decade or two were not necessarily in your favor (the quality of the "Mai Tai" Wayne Curtis described in his article being a case in point!). Perhaps he knew where he was going and it was a quality locale but not every tourist is likely to have the same cocktail acumen!

Yes, sadly, I hear all over that the art of drink (and, worse, food) is not what it once was in Havana. If only someone or someones would thoroughly study the old Cuban style and devote themselves to reviving it... ;-)
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Last night I assayed a scorpion thanks to Anna and Kerry.  Pleasant enough due to the lovely fresh squeezed juices, but somehow I couldn't quite detect the rum and Cognac.  Tonight were a pair of mai tais, one white and one less so.  Both nice!  If I can still stand I may do the anoved corn on the cob as planned for dinner.

 

Secretly I wish my juicer were a pretty blue like Kerry's.

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Rubicon (Basically a Last Word + Rosemary + Fire)

oFdzaUUt.png

(screencap from the wife's video!)

 

Very nice!  I love rosemary and gave this a try today.  The rosemary added to the lovely pale green color of the chartreuse and the added ice gave a nice bit of dilution that I liked on a warm summer evening.

rubicon.jpg

Should have used prettier ice!

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Pretty! Did the rosemary add anything to the cocktail, other than fireworks?

 

This weekend I was asked to make a cocktail for a bbq party at a friend's place. I decided to make Seelbach cocktails since he loves bourbon.

Bulleit bourbon, Cointreau, Angostura and Peychaud's bitters, Crémant de Bourgogne, orange twist, with the ratios from Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails

 

20104668858_c7f3e38c06_z.jpg

 

 

Basic setup.

 

20284605372_eae9a9eb2c_z.jpg

 

 

The stuff I brought to the party. This is a wine bag with inside pockets for bottles, very handy.

Not pictured: a recycled wine box for the glasses, and another bag with oranges and miscellaneous items.

 

19592668894_1f35c23ccf_z.jpg

 

I had brought ingredients for a Southside cocktail, but we ended up just drinking the sparkling wine instead.

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Pretty! Did the rosemary add anything to the cocktail, other than fireworks?

.....

 

I forgot to comment on the rosemary.  Yes, I tasted a bit of bright, fresh rosemary that stood out above the overall herbal flavors of the chartreuse.  I suspect the source of that flavor was more the second sprig of rosemary that got whacked around with the ice and other ingredients in the shaker rather than the one that was flamed. But the fireworks were fun and I thought the rosemary flavor intensified a bit over time in the glass, so that singed sprig may have played a role as well.  At least in my glass :laugh: !

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I forgot to comment on the rosemary.  Yes, I tasted a bit of bright, fresh rosemary that stood out above the overall herbal flavors of the chartreuse.  I suspect the source of that flavor was more the second sprig of rosemary that got whacked around with the ice and other ingredients in the shaker rather than the one that was flamed. But the fireworks were fun and I thought the rosemary flavor intensified a bit over time in the glass, so that singed sprig may have played a role as well.  At least in my glass :laugh: !

 

Cool. Rosemary seems very much a trend. A friend served me a rosemary gin fizz the other day (Old Raj gin, lemon, honey syrup, rosemary sprig, carbonated water). We had to severely whack the thing to be able to taste it.

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From last week, a Hanky Panky (Ada Coleman, PDT ratios) with Beefeater gin, Cocchi vermouth di Torino, Fernet-Branca.

 

19974184869_2de9c1f025_z.jpg

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From last week, a Hanky Panky (Ada Coleman, PDT ratios) with Beefeater gin, Cocchi vermouth di Torino, Fernet-Branca.

 

Willing to share the PDT ratios? I've really enjoyed the drink in the past but it has seemed to me keeping the Fernet from taking over takes some care in measuring.

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A new one, of my own devising (possibly only about the second such in existence!).

 

The Sloe Loris - sloe gin, Swedish punsch, dry sherry (I used a Manzanilla), Cynar:

 

Sloe_Loris.jpg

 

We got a bottle of Hayman's sloe gin a while ago, partly because I couldn't find any sloes to make my own and partly because we hoped it would be similar to the Spanish pacharan we've enjoyed many times.  Disappointing stuff, really; not as nice as pacharan on its own (even taking into account that we're not on holiday in Spain) and very dominant in any cocktails we'd tried it in.  So this.  Way too sweet with the dry vermouth I started with, but the idea of sherry came to me in the middle of the night.  It's now quite tasty, I think, but I'm happy to look at further tweaks should you fine chaps and chapettes care to offer any.

 

And for the uninitiated.

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... the idea of sherry came to me in the middle of the night.

 

I love this quote from you, lesliec!  I think it belongs on some Anne Taintor cocktail napkins or coasters.  Something along these lines:

AnneTaintor.jpg

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I needed something strong last night after a long and eventful day. So I went Old Fashioned with Elijah Craig 12-year bourbon and Angostura bitters.

 

20119035868_768f23ee45_z.jpg


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)
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FrogPrincesse, on the same line, I needed something strong last night so it was Elijah Craig Barrel Proof 137 over ice

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