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EvergreenDan

Drinks! 2015 - 2016

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7 hours ago, FrogPrincesse said:

Martinique Reviver at Fairweather this weekend with rhum agricole, lime juice, coconut liqueur. Like a longer version of a Ti Punch. Delightful.

 

Martinique Reviver at Fairweather

 

 

 

 

Very pretty.  Could you link the coconut liquor you used?

 

I ask because in place of your usual array of bottles is what looks like kerosene.  That's deep end of the pier.

 

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4 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Very pretty.  Could you link the coconut liquor you used?

 

I ask because in place of your usual array of bottles is what looks like kerosene.  That's deep end of the pier.

 

Haha. This wasn't my creation, but I can try to find out... :)

 

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It looks like the Fairweather guys are keeping their secrets for now. I will have to try to extract them in person...

 

Here is a Manhattan from about a week ago with Wild Turkey rye 101, Cocchi vermouth di Torino, Miracle Mile forbidden bitters. It had a lot of nice warming spices.

 

Manhattan with Wild Turkey rye 101, Cocchi vermouth di Torino, Miracle Mile forbidden bitters #cocktail #cocktails #craftcocktails #whiskey #rye

 

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1 hour ago, FrogPrincesse said:

@JoNorvelleWalker The Martinique reviver depicted above was made with Clement white rhum and Clement coconut liqueur (plus lime juice). Of course I just went to Hi-Time last week and spotted the coconut liqueur, but didn't buy it. :(

 

https://www.hitimewine.net/clement-mahina-de-coco-liqueur-750ml-106511

 

 

Thanks!  My local rum monger can order Clement.

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Fast becoming one of my favourite tipples, anyone else tried one of these, if so ..... your thoughts, if not - try and and then ...... your thoughts.

 

 

 


 

paintbrush.jpg
 

 

1 dash of orange juice
1 measure of dry vermouth
1 measure of sweet vermouth
1 measure gin
 
Moisten the edge of a port glass or round wine glass and dip into castor sugar. Shake the ingredients well with ice and strain into this glass. Decorate with a twist of lemon peel, if liked.

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Hot Mess at The Crack Shack, Richard Blais' chicken and egg place: mezcal, Ancho Reyes, grapefruit, lime, honey. Spicy, smoky, and a bit tart - a good brunch drink, great with the food.

 

Hot Mess at The Crack Shack: mexcal, Ancho Reyes, grapefruit, lime, honey

 

 

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A Nolita from a few nights ago with Sipsmith London dry gin, Campari, Cocchi vermouth di Torino, St. George coffee liqueur. Simple and pretty great!

 

Nolita (Christian Siglin) with Sipsmith London dry gin, Campari, Cocchi vermouth di Torino, St. George coffee liqueur #cocktail #cocktails #campari #gin #negroni

 

 

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An interesting one: Matt Tanner's Cassis de Dijon

  • 1 oz Cruzan Blackstrap rum
  • 3/4 oz Cassis
  • 3/4 oz Lemon juice
  • 1 barspoon Turbinado simple
  • 1⁄2 barspoon Dijon mustard
  • Not shown: blackberry and lemon wedge garnish

Would've never come up with this myself! Sweet and tart flavors predominate. A more predictable drink would counter that with something bitter, but here instead we get savory/spicy mustard. 

 

This is the second time I've tried Dijon in a cocktail. The first was Jason Schiffer's Crippled Creek, which similarly works it against tart flavors (in that case, pomegranate instead of blackcurrant). Both work well to my taste!

IMG_2040.jpg

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17 hours ago, Craig E said:

An interesting one: Matt Tanner's Cassis de Dijon

  • 1 oz Cruzan Blackstrap rum
  • 3/4 oz Cassis
  • 3/4 oz Lemon juice
  • 1 barspoon Turbinado simple
  • 1⁄2 barspoon Dijon mustard
  • Not shown: blackberry and lemon wedge garnish

Would've never come up with this myself! Sweet and tart flavors predominate. A more predictable drink would counter that with something bitter, but here instead we get savory/spicy mustard. 

 

This is the second time I've tried Dijon in a cocktail. The first was Jason Schiffer's Crippled Creek, which similarly works it against tart flavors (in that case, pomegranate instead of blackcurrant). Both work well to my taste!

 

I've been to 320 Main quite a few times and had heard about Jason Schiffer's drink... but generally I prefer to stick to tiki drinks when I am there! Mustard seemed a bit out there. It's interesting to hear your description and understand how mustard can work in a drink.

 

 

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Needed something to cleanse the palate before ice cream.  Chose mountain strength poitin.  How I love poitin.  I notice that my lips are numb.  Perhaps a wine glass was too much?  Or is it that my Baccarat wine glasses are technically large water goblets??

 

Hmmm.

 

 

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...rather like burning tires -- reminiscent of Neilson L'Esprit's butyl rubber, but without the latter's femmy French sensibilities.

 

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The green fairy following a zombie.  The green fairy wins!

 

And, yes, I know, a trickle of absinthe goes in the zombie.

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@Rafa's Honeywell, which is a way of making a Rusty Nail using seven bottles and two fruits! :D 

I see why "honey" is in the name, as this is a very sweet drink. Out-of-balance sweet at first sip, though I realized that the recipe's (discarded) orange twist and (inserted) lemon twist are intended as the key to counter the cloying aspect, and the zests I had at hand were limp and ungenerous, unfortunately. With better citrus this would have worked still better, though it's still a dessert-time sipper. Complex orange and complex tobacco under the honey. 

IMG_2051.jpg


Edited by Craig E (log)
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Returned to the Broken Flower, this time with proper cinnamon syrup, and a photo. 

  • 1 1⁄2 oz Espolon Reposado Tequila (Cazadores)
  • 3⁄4 oz Cynar
  • 1⁄2 oz Lime juice
  • 1⁄2 oz Grapefruit juice
  • 1⁄2 oz Cinnamon syrup
  • 2 ds Bitters, Angostura
  • Grapefruit twist

Five stars! 

IMG_2058.png

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A French bistro here in Jersey City, that had previously been a BYO establishment, recently changed locations and got a liquor license. The owners also run a wine store in town that features a small but well-curated selection of spirits. I've become friends with them over the years and occasionally put together a cocktail tasting to help them push whatever new spirits come in. When word got out they were moving to a place with a full bar I offered to do their cocktail menu and they accepted. I tried to keep it based in French spirits/liqueurs, and primarily used stuff they already are selling at the store in an effort to keep the inventory manageable for at least the first few months. From testing/tweaking this is what I've been drinking a lot of recently ... The new place has only been open for 8 days, but so far the reaction to the cocktails has been pretty decent.

13330936_10154148212130539_7559147767997422404_n.jpg

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Sea of Cortez: Blanco tequila, lime, cassis, and Cointreau. Essentially a margarita with blackcurrant liqueur added. I might try a little salt next time, if not on the rim then thrown into the shaker. 

cortez.png

 


Edited by Craig E Spelling (log)

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Since I don't have to get up this afternoon...following dinner, Balaklava Special No. I, Charles H. Baker Jr. -- freedom for Crimea, the thin red line, Tennyson, the charge of the light brigade and all of that.  Genuine @feste grenadine makes all the difference.

 

No picture because you've all seen a large Baccarat water goblet full of ice before.  Don't know why I don't serve this beverage more often.  It really is most satisfactory.

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So, the Plantation Pineapple Rum, aka "Stiggins' Delight" is a pretty ridiculous product, but in a good way. 

 

It's delicious by itself, it's great in a daiquiri, but it's also surprisingly good in stirred cocktails.

 

A friend who just got back from New Orleans told me about a Pineapple Sazerac on the menu at Cane and Table.

He lamented not ordering it, but we quickly remedied that by making our own.

We weren't sure if it was merely a Sazerac with the Pineapple Rum as the base spirit, or if there were any other swaps, but we made one that way, and it was fantastic. Surprisingly good. And, through the power of facebook, we very quickly heard back from one of the bartenders that we were correct. Apparently they'll cut it with rye if they're running low on the pineapple rum, but otherwise it's a standard Sazerac recipe. 

 

Also, for Negroni Week, I made a Pineapple Negroni, which was also fantastic. 1:1:1 with Campari and Carpano Antica. 

At some point, I might try spiking it with a little Smith and Cross, too. 

 

I've also combined it with Cynar 70 for something similar to a negroni, but I can't remember what ratios I ended up with. Still, it's a delicious idea. 

pineapple negroni.jpg

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On 6/17/2016 at 5:13 PM, campus five said:

We weren't sure if it was merely a Sazerac with the Pineapple Rum as the base spirit, or if there were any other swaps, but we made one that way, and it was fantastic. Surprisingly good. And, through the power of facebook, we very quickly heard back from one of the bartenders that we were correct. Apparently they'll cut it with rye if they're running low on the pineapple rum, but otherwise it's a standard Sazerac recipe. 

 

 

 

I happened to pick up a bottle of the Stiggins on Saturday and made a Sazerac on your suggestion - the only substitute I made was subbing Green Chartreuse for absinthe in the rinse. Fantastic about sums it up.

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Somewhat untikilike but dancing with my friend the green fairy at the moment.

 

Edgar_Degas_-_In_a_Caf%C3%A9_-_Google_Ar

 

 

Wikipedia, public domain.


Edited by JoNorvelleWalker spelling (log)

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"Wikipedia, pubic domain."

 

Perchance you have been enchanted by that fairy?

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